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Which clippings match 'Academy Award' keyword pg.1 of 1
26 FEBRUARY 2014

Life After Pi: a plea to change practices deemed unsustainable in the VFX industry

"In February of 2013, John Hughes, founder of Rhythm & Hues Studios, regretfully announced that the company was going bankrupt. With no way to pay his hard working employees, and no other options, hundreds were laid off. Two weeks later, they won the Academy Award for Best Visual Effects for 'Life of Pi.'

These were tragic, ironic times, and as employees, we were compelled to document it. As the bankruptcy finalized and layoffs continued, we began filming–watching helplessly as one of the most prestigious VFX companies in the world crumbled. As we all asked how this could happen, many stood up in outrage, sounding the alarm that this incident was not an isolated event, but a reflection of greater problems.

The old model of the movie business is passing away, yet modern–day Hollywood grips it ever more tightly. VFX companies and artists are treated as mere cogs in the machine, with little regard to creating a sustainable, collaborative working relationship. This will lead not only to the demise of more VFX companies, but to increasing instability industry wide.

Rhythm & Hues reached new heights in visual effects mastery with its stunning work on 'Life of Pi,' yet they still fell into bankruptcy.

'Life After Pi' reveals the behind–the–scenes factors that led to this sad and unforgettable moment in the history of Hollywood."

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2013Academy Award • bankruptcy • behind-the-scenesdesign industrydesign professionalsHollywood • John Hughes • Life of Pi (2012) • masterymovie business • production model • redundancy • Rhythm and Hues Studios • sounding the alarm • sustainable practicesustainable production practicestransforming workplaces • unsustainable pattern of production • unsustainable practices • VFXVFX industriesvisual effectsvisual effects industryworking practices of designers

CONTRIBUTOR

Jonathan Hearn
24 DECEMBER 2013

Bunny: tale of a cranky elderly bunny baking in her kitchen when a pesky moth flies in to disturb her lonely late-night activity

Fig.1 Chris Wedge (1998) "Bunny", Blue Sky Studios.

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1998Academy Awardafter deathafterlifeallegoryanimated short filmanimationanthropomorphism • baking • Blue Sky Studios • bunny • Bunny (1998) • Bunny Blue Sky • cabin • cake • cake batter • Chris Wedge • computer animationcontemplating mortalitydeathfantasy about deathforest • gateway • heaven • husband • kitchenlate nightlonelinesslosslove storymortalitymothovenrabbitremembranceromantic loveshort filmsoulmatesvisual effectswedding day

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 MAY 2011

Keeping Britain's special effects dream alive

"The country's reputation as the go–to Hollywood alternative was underlined at this year's Academy Awards when London–based Double Negative picked up the visual effects Oscar for its work on Inception.

The company, which has also been involved in the Harry Potter and Batman series, employs around 950 people at its headquarters in Soho.

Across the UK, approximately 5,000 people work in SFX post–production, according to the UK Screen Association.

But while business is currently booming, there are dark, computer–generated, clouds on the horizon.

A report, commissioned by the government and published earlier this year, delivered a worrying prognosis.

It warned that, while special effects was enjoying a rapid growth, the sector was also 'having to source talent from overseas because of skills shortages at home'.

The study, entitled Next Gen, concluded: 'That is mainly a failing of our education system – from schools to universities and it needs to be tackled urgently if we are to remain globally competitive.'

Part of the problem is the lack of awareness of the profession among young people, according to Paul Franklin, a visual effects supervisor and part of Double Negative's Oscar–winning team.

'There is not a huge amount of information available to them,' he told BBC News.

'Typically you tend to find that students who are seeking out courses in visual effects and film–making are the self motivated types who have gone out and found the information themselves.'

'It is something we work very hard at, but schools and colleges could be more aware about how a creative art education can be applied in the world of high–end modern digital media,' he said."

(BBC News, 14 May 2011)

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Academy Award • accolade • American Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences • AMPAS • Batmancomputer-generated • creative art education • creative careercreative economydesign curriculadesign disciplinedesign professiondigital mediaDouble Negativeeducation systemfilmmaking • globally competitive • Harry PotterHollywoodInception (2010) • lack of awareness • LondonNext Gen. reportOscar • Paul Franklin • post productionprofessional practiceSFXskills shortageSohospecial effectsstudentUK • UK Screen Association • VFX industriesvisual effects • visual effects supervisor

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 OCTOBER 2003

Michaël Dudok De Wit's Father and Daughter

"A father says goodbye to his young daughter and leaves. As the wide Dutch landscapes live through their seasons so the girl lives through hers. She becomes a young woman, has a family and in time she becomes old, yet within her there is always a deep longing for her father."

(Animation World Network)

Fig.1 & 2 Directed by Michaël Dudok De Wit; Produced by Claire Jennings; Willem Thijssen; Written by Michaël Dudok De Wit; Music by Normand Roger; Denis L. Chartrand; Release date(s) 2000; Running time 8:30 minutes; Country United Kingdom; Belgium; Netherlands; Language no dialogue.

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20002D animationAcademy Awardafterlifeallegoryanimated short filmanimationboatcontemplating mortalitydaughterdeathdramaDutch animationfather • Father and Daughter (2000) • female protagonistfilmhand-illustratedhand-painted stop motion animationillustrative stylelandscapelifelossmemorymetaphor • Michael Dudok De Wit • mortalityNetherlandspathosremembrance • riverbed • seasons • sepia • sepiatone • storywatercolouryoung girl
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