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Which clippings match 'Brand Manager' keyword pg.1 of 1
01 MARCH 2014

Brand Book vs Brand Guidelines vs Brand Bible

"A brand book is the physical manifestation of the living, breathing concept that is your brand. Without a guiding document, the Brand can spin out into an inconsistent set of representations. In an attempt to slow that process, Marketing Departments often develop Brand usage guidelines. These guiding documents have a lot of names: Brand Book, Brand Guidelines, Brand Bible, Identity Guidelines, etc, etc, etc. But whatever you call it, the Brand Book helps to define the standard elements of the Brand identity, in an attempt to limit the inconsistency that would otherwise develop as the Brand is implemented and actively used."

(Tisha Oehmen)

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TAGS

bible (guide)brand behavioursbrand biblebrand book • brand elements • brand guidelines • brand history • brand identitybrand manager • brand philosophy • brand position • brand space • brand usage guidelines • branding • co-branding guidelines • colour choicecommunication design systems • corporate identity systems • design guidelines • Deutsche Bankdocument • guide document • guidelines • guiding document • identity guidelines • identity guidelines book • inconsistency • internal staff • marketing department • marketing partners • marketing team • overview document • parent brand • physical manifestationposition-statementpositioning statements • source document • standard elements • standardisation • sub-brand • technical document • typography guidelines • understand the brand • visual identity systems

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 MARCH 2012

Stylus: business intelligence and inspiration to drive new ideas

"Culture & Media reveals how the worlds of entertainment, media and digital and the creative side of marketing and advertising influence cultural movements that impact on business decisions. Expert reports on art, graphics, illustration and global exhibitions offer visual inspiration for inquisitive creative minds."

(Stylus media group)

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TAGS

account manager • active leisure time • advertisingart and cultureart worldB2Bbrand managerbrand strategy • business decisions • buyers • childrenswear • colour • colour trends • commercial implications • commercial insightconsumer lifestylesconsumer productsconsumer products in homeconsumer trendscreative business insightscreative directorcreative industriescreative intelligence • creative marketing • creative media • creatively led retailing • cross-sector innovation • culture and media • design and cultural influences • design inspirationdesign magazinedesign resourcedesign trendsdigital commerce • entertainment news • expert information • expert report • fashion buyers • fashion design • fashion designers • fashion manufacturing • fashion retail • furniture designfuture concepts • gastronomy • global analysis • global expert opinion • global information • graduate showsgraphic designerhome accessories • hospitality • in-depth analysis • industrial design • industry executives • innovative design • inquisitive creative minds • insider guides • inspirational destinations • inspirational visual contentinspiring design • inspiring illustration • interior architectureinterior stylingknowledge based economyleisure industrieslifestyle • marketing manager • material trends • materials innovationmenswear • merchandise planner • merchandising and management • new productsnew servicesonline magazine • packaging designer • product designer • product developer • product directions • product launches • product manager • retail analysis • retail landscape • revenue-building ideasscience and technology • seasonal colour inspiration • sports and leisure • sports industries • store design • Stylus (magazine) • subscription service • sustainable thinking • technology innovationtextilestravel and leisure • travel industries • trend analysis • trend setting • trendsvisual communicationvisual culturevisual designvisual inspiration • visual merchandiser • visual merchandisingwomenswear • youth and beauty

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 MAY 2011

Market research should focus on emotional need states in all consumers rather than focus on segments as if they are stable and mutually exclusive

"The concept of the USP, as seen by the brand manager, is to focus on one main selling benefit of the brand versus those offered by competitors. The strategic thinking which goes into selecting a brand's USP resembles warfare between competitive brands, with imagery maps reflecting the battlefield, and positioning statements as the weapons. But where is the consumer in all of this?

Consumers do not want one characteristic or one USP. Consumers want it all. Why should a consumer have to choose between the longest lasting pain reliever versus the fast acting, or the safest, most gentle, or the cheapest priced? The concept of marketing a USP is not a consumer–centric view. It is not a realistic, relevant reflection of how consumers operate. Furthermore, a USP for a brand is limiting in appeal by the very definition of trying to sell one main benefit to the sub–segment of consumers which most values that one benefit. Consumers want pain relievers to be fast–acting, and safe, and strong, and inexpensive and more.

The consumers' emphasis on one or more of these benefits changes from occasion to occasion, and from mood to mood. Consumers are not stable, nor consistently rational. Although segmentation research allows us to place consumers into distinct groups, and to put a descriptive label on each person, consumers are not fixed with just the characteristics of the one segment. The reality is all consumers have all emotional needs within them. Some elements/associations are stronger and some are weaker, depending on the person and the day. Our emotional desires fluctuate such that what appeals to one person in one week might be less appropriate for the same person the next week. These fluctuations are hard to target because a population of consumers are all in fluctuation. This is why segmentation research can be so frustrating to market researchers when trying to neatly explain brand behaviors. Unique segments do not uniquely buy just one or two uniquely defined brands. And segments are not stable.

Instead, brand managers should be targeting all consumers with the intention of painting their brand with the emotional associations the brand can satiate. Market research should focus on emotional need states in all consumers rather than focus on segments as if they are stable and mutually exclusive. "

(John Hallward, 2007)

2). excerpt from John Hallward (2007). "Gimme! The Human Nature of Successful Marketing", Wiley

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TAGS

appeal • associations • brandbrand behavioursbrand managercharacteristicscommodity • competitive brands • competitorconsumer • consumer-centric view • descriptive labelsemotional desiresemotional needsemotive manipulationgroupshuman nature • John Hallward • market researchers • market segmentationmarketingpositioning statements • satiate • segmentation • segmentation research • selling • strategic thinkingsub-segment • successful marketing • target audience • unique selling point • unique selling proposition • USP

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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