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Which clippings match 'Definitions' keyword pg.1 of 1
06 JULY 2011

The Preface as Exegesis

"A preface provides a way into understanding a book: by stating its subject and scope, by commenting on techniques employed or themes addressed, or by focussing on a central or contentious issue. Prefacing involves an explicatory introduction to a reading of a work.

Some writers are more prone to prefacing than others. In the last century, three great exponents of the preface have been Graham Greene, Vladimir Nabokov and John Barth. Greene's prefaces are usually succinct, genuinely concerned with aspects of the writing process, and sometimes wryly humorous. ...

The idea of exegesis is not a recent imposition of universities upon creative writing; it is a long–term and also current feature of our overall culture. For almost two thousand years (as long as the word 'exegesis' can be backtracked in its significance) people have asked for explanations that linked written works produced in the culture to main concerns of the culture. Partly this has been a low culture plea to high culture. Partly it has been an element of ongoing high culture debate over contentious issues. 'Tell me further what you mean – analyse and dissect and orientate – so that I can more fully understand and believe you,' the culture has asked of texts on the one hand. But also it has said: 'Tell me further what you mean, so that I can better argue with you.' These are, I think, the two arms of the nature of exegesis."

(Nigel Krauth)

Krauth, N. (2002). "The Preface as Exegesis." TEXT 6(1).

TAGS

Australian universitiesBible • canonical text • commentary • contentious issues • creative writingcritical explanationculturedefinitionsexegesis • explanations • expositionhigh culture • interpretative text • linked written works • low cultureNigel KrauthPhD • preface • scripture • the nature of exegesis • treatise • universities

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 MAY 2011

Multimedia's peculiar nature challenges traditional categories; this in itself is an aspect of its radical character

"In the wake of post–modernist practice, computer–based media has resisted definition –– and for good reason: definitions are confining. They reduce the range of potential in the object defined by drawing attention away from what lies outside the wall of definition. This is a particular concern with new media, because one of its attractions is its fluid, multifarious character, its permeable walls. Digital media's peculiar nature challenges traditional categories; this in itself is an aspect of its radical character. But there is value in proposing and discussing alternative definitions of digital media –– even if these definitions are contingent, bracketed by circumstances. In fact, it may be best to regard them as contingent, because our experience with digital media is so fresh, and where it leads so unclear. The definitions of today will inevitably be replaced tomorrow, as new applications for digital media emerge over time. Definitions are meant to establish a shared vocabulary that can focus argument –– and often, covertly, to achieve a politically motivated purpose. The purpose of our project is overt: If, as Marshall McLuhan suggests, we literally construct the world we inhabit through the design and deployment of our media technologies –– because they enable certain behaviors while discouraging others –– then the social and political ramifications of how we define and address the emerging digital media are undeniable. By identifying a subject's key characteristics, we begin to say what it is and what it is not. For digital media this is particularly critical; if the digital arts community does not lead the discussion about how to define digital multimedia, and the types of behaviors it should or shouldn't encourage, other interests, like governments and corporations, will force a definition upon us."

(Ken Jordan, 2002)

Fig.1 'The Apple–1 Computer customised with an after–market wooden enclosure with carved name and keyboard'

2). Ken Jordan (2002). 'Defining Multimedia'

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TAGS

2002 • alternative definitions • Apple • bracketed by circumstances • categorisationcomputer-based mediacontingentcultural technologydefinitionsdesigndigital arts • digital arts community • digital mediadigital multimedia • emergence • emerging digital mediaenabling behaviours • fluidity • hybrid form • Ken Jordan • Marshall McLuhanmedia technologiesmedium • multi-media • multifarious character • multimediamutable • Nettime • new digital media applications • new media • permeable • post-modernist practice • Postmodern • radical character • Randall Packer • reductionism • shared vocabulary

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 FEBRUARY 2004

Wiki: Information Publishing and Linking Software

"A WikiWikiWeb enables documents to be authored collectively in a simple markup language using a web browser. Because most wikis are web–based, the term 'wiki' is usually sufficient. A single page in a wiki is referred to as a 'wiki page', while the entire body of pages, which are usually highly interconnected, is called 'the wiki'.'Wiki wiki' means 'fast' in the Hawaiian language, and it is the speed of creating and updating pages that is one of the defining aspects of wiki technology. Generally, there is no prior review before modifications are accepted, and most wikis are open to the general public or at least to all persons who also have access to the wiki server. In fact, even registration of a user account is not often required."

Wikipedia (01–02–2004)

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TAGS

2004 • calque • definitions • dense linking • etymology • Hawaiianhyperlinkedinformation in contextinformation networkintertwingularitylinking structure • MediaWiki • new technologyrhizomatic associationsrhizomatic structurerhizomorphousterminologywikiWikipedia • WikiWikiWeb • WikkaWiki
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