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Which clippings match 'Travelogue' keyword pg.1 of 2
09 NOVEMBER 2014

Examples of web based non-linear narratives

Bear 71 (2012); Clouds over Cuba (2012); Donnie Darko (film website); Gravity (2003) by Olia Lialina; Here at Home (webdoc); My Boyfriend Came Back from the War (1996) by Olia Lialina; Neon Bible (2007) by Arcade Fire; Prison Valley (2013); Random Paths (2001) by Jody Zellen; Telescopic Text (interactive); The (Former) General in his Labyrinth (2007); The 21 Steps (2008) by Charles Cumming; The Wilderness Downtown (2011) by Arcade Fire; Waterlife (2009); We Choose the Moon (2009); Welcome to Pine Point (2011).

TAGS

Aaron Koblinalternate reality gameArcade Fire • Arcade Fire (band) • archive footage • B-Reel (digital production company) • Banff National Park • Bear 71 (2012) • Charles Cumming • Chris Milk • Clouds over Cuba (2012) • Cuban Missile Crisis • David Dufresne • digital storytelling • Donnie Darko (film website) • Google Maps • Gravity (2003) • grizzly bear • Here at Home (webdoc) • hypermediainteractive digital narrativesinteractive documentaryinteractive experienceinteractive mediainteractive multimedia documentaryinteractive multimedia video • interactive online story • interactive storytellinginteractive web documentary • Jeremy Mendes • Jody Zellen • Joe Davis • Kevin McMahon • Leanne Allison • Michael Simons • Mohsin Hamid • My Boyfriend Came Back from the War (1996) • narrative nonfictionNational Film Board of Canada • Neon Bible (2007) • new mediaNFB • non-linear narrative • Olia Lialina • Paul Shoebridge • Philippe Brault • Prison Valley (2013) • Random Paths (2001) • Telescopic Text (interactive) • The (Former) General in his Labyrinth (2007) • The 21 Steps (2008) • The Wilderness Downtown (2011) • Tool of North America • travelogue • Waterlife (2009) • We Choose the Moon (2009) • We Tell Stories • web based non-linear narrativesweb documentarywebdoc • Welcome to Pine Point (2011)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 APRIL 2014

British Pathe releases 85,000 films on YouTube

"Newsreel archive British Pathé has uploaded its entire collection of 85,000 historic films, in high resolution, to its YouTube channel. This unprecedented release of vintage news reports and cinemagazines is part of a drive to make the archive more accessible to viewers all over the world.

'Our hope is that everyone, everywhere who has a computer will see these films and enjoy them,' says Alastair White, General Manager of British Pathé. 'This archive is a treasure trove unrivalled in historical and cultural significance that should never be forgotten. Uploading the films to YouTube seemed like the best way to make sure of that.'

British Pathé was once a dominant feature of the British cinema experience, renowned for first–class reporting and an informative yet uniquely entertaining style. It is now considered to be the finest newsreel archive in existence. Spanning the years from 1896 to 1976, the collection includes footage–not only from Britain, but from around the globe–ofmajor events, famous faces, fashion trends, travel, sport and culture. The archive is particularly strong in its coverage of the First and Second World Wars.

Alastair White continues: 'Whether you're looking for coverage of the Royal Family, the Titanic, the destruction of the Hindenburg, or quirky stories about British pastimes, it'll be there on our channel. You can lose yourself for hours.'

This project is being managed by German company Mediakraft, which has been responsible for numerous past YouTube successes. The company will be creating new content using British Pathé material, in English and in foreign languages."

(The British Pathé Archive, 17 April 2014)

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TAGS

1896 • 1976 • Alastair White • amateur photographerarchival materialarchiveBritish filmBritish PatheBritish Royal Family • cinemagazine • cosmeticscultural collecting organisationscultural heritagedigitisation project • Edward Curtis • factory girlfactory workerfilm archive • film collection • filmed news stories • First World War • footagehair styling • heat exchanger • heat pump • Hindenburg disaster • historic filmhistorical collection • holiday camp • Mediakraft • national cultural heritage onlinenews reportnewsreel • newsreel archive • pastimes • Playboy Bunny • Playboy Club • promotion and dissemination • RMS Titanic • sea travel • Second World Warshort subjectssocial history • Titanic disaster • travelogue • vintage films • WWIWWIIYouTubeYouTube channel

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JUNE 2013

Marianne North: pioneering botanical artist

"Victorian artist Marianne North, one of the only women of her time to travel to places like the Seychelles Islands, Australia, and Chile, and who left behind a trail of impressive art and writing about her botanical discoveries, is not a household name. ...

In 1871, when a 40–year–old North set out after the death of her father to travel around the world and to paint as many of world's flora in oils as possible, she unwittingly found herself both ahead of and behind her times. In the art world, she was definitely not part of the avant–garde; in France, Claude Monet and Pierre–Auguste Renoir had already started their Impressionist paintings, creating works that were worlds away from the status quo of a polished depiction of nature.

North went around the world twice, in fifteen years, traveling by train, boat, mule, and on foot, to every continent, except for Antarctica. In Brazil, where she spent 13 months, North painted lush landscapes and tropical flowers with tight brushstrokes and clean lines – a style that would soon be left behind with the revolutionary style of the Impressionists. North didn't perceive or paint her subjects in a particularly unique way, but she relayed every minute detail of a plant, flower, or landscape with breathtaking precision. Her paintings give you a straight, dispassionate look at an unfamiliar world."

(Alexia Nader, Garden Design)

Fig.1 Marianne North, New Zealand Flowers and Fruit, Date painted: early 1880s, Oil on board, 50.9 x 35.4 cm, Collection: Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

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TAGS

187119th centuryaccuracyAotearoa New ZealandartistAustraliabiodiversity • botanical artist • botanical record • BrazilCaliforniaCharles DarwinChiledepiction • dispassionate look • Edward Lear • fidelityfloragarden design • George Eliot • IndiaJapanKew Gardens • Marianne North • natural history • natural landscape • nature • non-European species • Origin of Speciespainting • painting nature • phytotomypioneering womenplant anatomyplantsscientific illustrationscientific illustrator • Seychelles • Seychelles Islands • travel • travel writing • travelogue • tropical plants • UK • unfamiliar world • Victorian art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 MAY 2013

The Open Road: an early travelogue in colour

"In 1924 Claude Friese–Greene (cinematographer and son of moving–image pioneer William) embarked on an intrepid road trip from Land's End to John O'Groats. He recorded his journey on film, using an experimental colour process. Entitled The Open Road, this remarkable travelogue was conceived as a series of 26 short episodes, to be shown weekly at the cinema."

(Independent Cinema Office, UK)

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TAGS

1920s1926BFI National Archive • British pioneer • cinemacinema pioneer • cinema technician • Claude Friese-Greene • colourcolour film • colour footage • colour processcultural heritageepisodes • experimental colour process • footage • Friese-Greene Natural Colour • history of cinema • Independent Cinema Office • John OGroats • Jonquil • journey • Lands End • Londonnatural colour • picture-postcard • road journey • road trip • social history • The Open Road (1926) • travelogueUK • William Friese-Greene • Yann Tiersen

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 JANUARY 2013

Samsara: a visual meditation on modern living

"Expanding on the themes they developed in BARAKA (1992) and CHRONOS (1985), SAMSARA explores the wonders of our world from the mundane to the miraculous, looking into the unfathomable reaches of man's spirituality and the human experience. Neither a traditional documentary nor a travelogue, SAMSARA takes the form of a nonverbal, guided meditation. Through powerful images, the film illuminates the links between humanity and the rest of nature, showing how our life cycle mirrors the rhythm of the planet.

The filmmakers approach non verbal filmmaking with an understanding that it must live up to the standard of great still photography, revealing the essence of a subject, not just its physical presence. SAMSARA was photographed entirely in 70mm film utilizing both standard frame rates and with a motion control time–lapse camera designed specifically for this project. This camera system allows perspective shifts to reveal extraordinary views of ordinary scenes. The images were then transferred through the highest resolution scanning process available to the new 4K digital projection format that allows for mesmerizing images of unprecedented clarity. SAMSARA will be a showpiece for the new, high–resolution 4K digital projection, the HD format, as well as standard digital and film projection."

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TAGS

2011 • 4K digital projection • 70mm film • assembly line • Baraka (1992) • cabinet of curiosities • Chronos (1985) • desertdocumentary filmethnographic film • ever turning wheel of life • factoryfactory workerfood productiongrotesquely beautiful imagery • guided meditation • human experience • human robotics • humanityindustrial ageindustrialisationintensive agricultureintensive farminginterconnectedness • life-cycle • Lisa Gerrard • manufactoriesmanufacturing processes • Marcello De Francisci • Mark Magidson • mesmerising images • Michael Stearns • modern centres • modern living • modern technology • motion control time-lapse • natural world • non verbal filmmaking • production linerhythm of the planet • Ron Fricke • rubbish • Samsara (2011) • spirituality • Super Panavision 70 • sweeping landscapes • tableau vivanttimelapse • timelapse photography • traffic congestiontravelogue • visual meditation • visual patternwordless

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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