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Which clippings match 'Appropriation' keyword pg.1 of 9
29 JANUARY 2017

Jonathan McIntosh: Building a Critical Culture with Remix Video

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2008appropriationArs Electronica Festival • blip.tv • critical culture • critical perspectivescut-up techniquecut-up videosDIY media • identity correction ad • Jonathan McIntosh • political prankster • political remix videorecontextualising found objectsremix videosocial critiquesocial norms • subversive remix video • transformative video remixtransformative workvideo remixYouTube video

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 NOVEMBER 2016

Technology/Transformation: Wonder Woman by Dara Birnbaum

"Explosive bursts of fire open Technology/Transformation, an incendiary deconstruction of the ideology embedded in television form and pop cultural iconography. Appropriating imagery from the 1970s TV series Wonder Woman, Birnbaum isolates and repeats the moment of the 'real' woman's symbolic transformation into super-hero. Entrapped in her magical metamorphosis by Birnbaum's stuttering edits, Wonder Woman spins dizzily like a music-box doll. Through radical manipulation of this female Pop icon, she subverts its meaning within the television text. Arresting the flow of images through fragmentation and repetition, Birnbaum condenses the comic-book narrative — Wonder Woman deflects bullets off her bracelets, 'cuts' her throat in a hall of mirrors — distilling its essence to allow the subtext to emerge. In a further textual deconstruction, she spells out the words to the song Wonder Woman in Discoland on the screen. The lyrics' double entendres ('Get us out from under... Wonder Woman') reveal the sexual source of the superwoman's supposed empowerment: 'Shake thy Wonder Maker.' Writing about the 'stutter-step progression of 'extended moments' of transformation from Wonder Woman,' Birnbaum states, 'The abbreviated narrative — running, spinning, saving a man — allows the underlying theme to surface: psychological transformation versus television product. Real becomes Wonder in order to 'do good' (be moral) in an (a) or (im)moral society.'"

(Electronic Arts Intermix)

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1970s1978 • abbreviated narrative • appropriationbracelet • comic book narrative • critical appropriation • cultural subversion • Dara Birnbaum • deconstruction • discoland • double entendre • Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) • extended moments • feminist artfeminist critiquefirefragmentation • hall of mirrors • incendiary device • influential video artists • magical metamorphosis • metamorphosis • music-box doll • pop cultural iconography • pop culture artpop icon • psychological transformation • radical manipulationrepeating formrepeating patternrepetitionrunning • saving a man • sexual empowerment • Sony Portapak • spinningstutter-step progressionstuttering editssubversion • super hero • symbolic transformation • Technology Transformation Wonder Woman (1978) • television form • television imagery • television product • television text • textual deconstruction • TV series • underlying theme • video artvideo artistvideo artwork • Wonder Woman (television programme)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 NOVEMBER 2016

Rap & Hip-Hop was born in 1973 at 1520 Sedgwick Avenue

"Hip-hop music is generally considered to have been pioneered in New York's South Bronx in 1973 by Jamaican-born Kool DJ Herc. At a Halloween dance party thrown by his younger sister, Herc used an innovative turntable technique to stretch a song's drum break by playing the break portion of two identical records consecutively. The popularity of the extended break lent its name to 'breakdancing'--a style specific to hip-hop culture, which was facilitated by extended drumbreaks played by DJs at New York dance parties. By the mid-1970s, New York's hip-hop scene was dominated by seminal turntablists DJ Grandmaster Flash, Afrika Bambaataa, and Herc. The rappers of Sugarhill Gang produced hip-hop's first commercially successful hit, 'Rapper's Delight,' in 1979'.

Rap itself--the rhymes spoken over hip-hop music--began as a commentary on the ability--or 'skillz'--of a particular DJ while that DJ was playing records at a hip-hop event. MCs, the forerunners of today's rap artists, introduced DJs and their songs and often recognized the presence of friends in the audience at hip-hop performances. Their role was carved out by popular African-American radio disc jockeys in New York during the latel96Os, who introduced songs and artists with spontaneous rhymes. The innovation of MCs caught the attention of hip-hop fans. Their rhymes lapped over from the transition period between the end of one song and the introduction of the next to the songs themselves. Their commentaries moved solely from a DJ's skillz to their own personal experiences and stories. The role of MCs in performances rose steadily, and they began to be recognized as artists in their own right [2].

The local popularity of the rhythmic music served by DJs at dance parties and clubs, combined with an increase in 'b-boys'--breakdancers--and graffiti artists and the growing importance of MCs, created a distinctive culture known as hip-hop. For the most part, hip-hop culture was defined and embraced by young, urban, working-class African-Americans. Hip-hop music originated from a combination of traditionally African-American forms of music--including jazz, soul, gospel, and reggae. It was created by working-class African-Americans, who, like Herc, took advantage of available tools--vinyl records and turntables--to invent a new form of music that both expressed and shaped the culture of black New York City youth in the 1970s."

(Becky Blanchard, 1999)

2). Information on MCs drawn from the University of Maryland's "Mcing: The Past" and "MCing: The Present" in "A Brief History of Hip-Hop Culture"

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1970s1973African AmericanAfrika Bambaataaappropriation • b-boys • b-girls • Becky Blanchard • black culture • block party • break dancing • breakbeat • breakdance • breakdancing • Cindy Campbell • civil rights movement • Clive Campbell • cultural expression • dance party • DJ • DJ Grandmaster Flash • DJing • extended break • gospel • graffiti art • graffiti artists • Grandmaster Flash • hip-hophip-hop backbeat • hip-hop culture • hip-hop music • hip-hop performance • hip-hop scene • jazz • Kool DJ Herc • l960s • MC • MCing • music history • musical form • New York City • radio disc jockey • rap • rap artist • rap music • rapperreggae • rhyme • rhythmic music • Sedgwick Avenue • skillz • soul • South Bronx • spoken word • Sugarhill Gang • turntable • turntable technique • turntablist • vinyl record • West Bronx • working classworking class cultureyouth culture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 NOVEMBER 2016

The vaporwave aesthetic and the music playing behind an infomercial for public access purgatory

"Vaporwave isn’t just something you listen to either, it’s something you experience, and experiences include visuals. Vaporwave visual art, simply referred to as 'aesthetics,' is varied but tends to honor some core tenets. If you’re looking at something pink and teal with a marble classical bust and a glitchy Windows 95 logo, you’re probably looking at a vaporwave aesthetic. If you’re watching a YouTube video with a title written in a weirdly soothing stretched out font, you’re probably watching a vaporwave aesthetic.

If you haven’t guessed by now, vaporwave is a bit of a joke, or more accurately, an internet meme. Vaporwave’s trippy immediate artistic ancestor 'seapunk' was a running inside joke on Tumblr during 2011 about fashion and art and music inspired by the ocean. The look and sound of a psychedelic club run by a hipster Ariel from The Little Mermaid is a pretty accurate summation. Neon seapunk imagery even found its way into Rihanna’s 2012 Saturday Night Live performance, confounding many viewers with its colorful and stylish but garish, cheap, and seemingly unprofessional grainy green screen look. The exact difference between seapunk and vaporwave is blurry, but as far as I understand vaporwave trades the aquatic focus for a fascination with the emptiness of aging and/or amateur glossy commercialism. It’s the music playing behind an infomercial for public access purgatory."

(Jordan Minor, 03 June 2016)

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amateur cultural production • amateur glossy commercialism • anti-corporate aesthetic • appropriation • cheesy • classical bust • colour schemecolourfulcomputer graphicsconsumption spectacle • cultural aesthetic • digital texts • emptiness • fan art • Floral Shoppe (2011) • inside joke • internet art form • internet cultureInternet memeirony • Japanese funk • Macintosh Plus (musical alias) • manipulating samples • manufactured nostalgia • marble • memenetworked productionnew forms of expression • new sincerity • nostalgic style • oceanparticipatory mediapinkpsychedelic imageryreappropriationremix culture • retro computer graphics • runaway consumerism • seapunk • Sega Genesis • Simpsonwave • Simpsonwave aesthetic • slow jams • stretched out font • teal • tech-fueled nostalgic loop • tech-savvy • The Little Mermaid • The Simpsons (television) • trippy • Tumblrvaporware • vaporwave • vaporwave aesthetic • vaporwave visual art • Vektroid (electronic musician) • video gamesvisual aestheticsWindows 95

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 APRIL 2016

Vidding is a fan-made music video genre using appropriated content

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amateur cultural productionamateur videoappropriationauthorship • cast video • consumption spectaclefan art • fan filmmaking • fan made • fan-made video • fandomidentity performanceinternet culturemediated culture • multifandom • music videoparticipatory media culturere-cutremix cultureviddingvideo collagevideo re-cutvideo reinterpretationvideo remixvideo repurposing • Visionary Vidding Contest (VVC) • YouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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