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Which clippings match 'Human Being' keyword pg.1 of 1
26 JUNE 2011

Victor Frankenstein's horror at infusing life into an inanimate body

"The different accidents of life are not so changeable as the feelings of human nature. I had worked hard for nearly two years, for the sole purpose of infusing life into an inanimate body. For this I had deprived myself of rest and health. I had desired it with an ardour that far exceeded moderation; but now that I had finished, the beauty of the dream vanished, and breathless horror and disgust filled my heart. Unable to endure the aspect of the being I had created, I rushed out of the room and continued a long time traversing my bed–chamber, unable to compose my mind to sleep. At length lassitude succeeded to the tumult I had before endured, and I threw myself on the bed in my clothes, endeavouring to seek a few moments of forgetfulness. But it was in vain; I slept, indeed, but I was disturbed by the wildest dreams. I thought I saw Elizabeth, in the bloom of health, walking in the streets of Ingolstadt. Delighted and surprised, I embraced her, but as I imprinted the first kiss on her lips, they became livid with the hue of death; her features appeared to change, and I thought that I held the corpse of my dead mother in my arms; a shroud enveloped her form, and I saw the grave–worms crawling in the folds of the flannel. I started from my sleep with horror; a cold dew covered my forehead, my teeth chattered, and every limb became convulsed; when, by the dim and yellow light of the moon, as it forced its way through the window shutters, I beheld the wretch – the miserable monster whom I had created. He held up the curtain of the bed; and his eyes, if eyes they may be called, were fixed on me. His jaws opened, and he muttered some inarticulate sounds, while a grin wrinkled his cheeks. He might have spoken, but I did not hear; one hand was stretched out, seemingly to detain me, but I escaped and rushed downstairs. I took refuge in the courtyard belonging to the house which I inhabited, where I remained during the rest of the night, walking up and down in the greatest agitation, listening attentively, catching and fearing each sound as if it were to announce the approach of the demoniacal corpse to which I had so miserably given life."

(Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley, The Project Gutenberg)

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TAGS

beingbodybreathe life intocomposites • conventional morality • corpsecreation of a new speciescreatorcreature • demon • demoniacal corpse • design responsibilitydiscoveryethicsexperimentationFrankensteinguilthorrorhuman being • human life • human nature • human society • inanimate body • Ingolstadt • lifemankind • Mary Godwin • Mary Shelleymoral dilemmamoral imaginationsnatureProject GutenbergPrometheus (mythology)speciesspeculative fictionspeculative researchVictor Frankenstein • Wollstonecraft

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JUNE 2011

What Does It Mean To Become A Master?

"In the 1960's and 70's, the advent of computers not only reinforced this notion of man as a rational animal, it also led many people to predict that we would soon have machines that could think and act just like human beings. In 1972, however, Hubert Dreyfus's seminal and controversial book What Computers Can't Do anticipated the failure of what came to be known as 'artificial intelligence'.

In the book, Dreyfus explains that human beings are not at all like computers. We do not apply abstract, context–free rules to compute how to act when we engage in skilled behavior. Instead, Dreyfus argued, the fundamental thing about humans is that we are embodied beings living in a shared world of social practices and equipment. In the end, it is our skillful mastery and our shared practices that not only distinguish us from machines but allow us to assume meaningful identities."

(Tao Ruspoli, 2010)

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TAGS

19722010 • a sense of wonder • a world full of meaning • abstract thoughtAlbert Borgmannartificial intelligence • Being in the World (film) • Charles Taylor • context-free rules • craftsmanshipcreative skills • embodied beings • exemplary figures • existential phenomenologists • existential philosophers • existentialism • flamenco master • godsheroes • Hiroshi Sakaguchi • Hubert Dreyfushuman being • Iain Thomson • jazz master • John Haugeland • Leah Chase • Lindsay Benner • living in a shared worldmachines • man as a rational animal • Manuel Molina • Mark Wrathall • Martin Heidegger • master carpenter • master chef • master juggler • masters • masterymeaning • meaningful identities • modern day masters • musical genius • rational animal • sacred • saints • Sean Kelly • shared practices • sinners • skilful masteryskillskilled behaviourskillful copingsocial practicessports stars • Tao Ruspoli • Taylor Carman • thinking machines • unique situation • What Computers Can't Do

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JANUARY 2004

Corporeality is situated in dwelling space: the revolution begins at home

"[Henri] Lefèbvre gives an interpretation of [Satz] Hölderlin's assertion that the 'human being' can only live as a poet. The relationship of the 'human being' to the world, to 'nature', to his desires and corporeality is situated in dwelling space; this is where it realises itself and becomes readable. It is impossible for him to build or to have a home in which he lives, without possessing something that is different from everyday life, that points beyond itself, namely his relationship to potentiality and the imaginary. This desire is encapsulated in even the most destitute hut, the most dreary high–rise apartment in [e.g. kitsch] objects. In objects possessing exactly those qualities that modernism wanted to do away with."

(Park Fiction 1995/98)

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TAGS

apartmentcorporealcultural purposedifferentiationdwellingeverydayeveryday lifeHenri Lefebvrehomehuman beinghumanismhumanistic perspectivehutimaginarykitsch • Marxist humanism • naturepoetprivate space • production of space • reproduction of social relations of production • Satz Holderlin • scriptible spacessituatedsocial space • spatial justice • urban design
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