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Which clippings match 'Herbert Simon' keyword pg.1 of 1
28 JUNE 2019

Herbert Simon on How we can study the process of creativity

"Cognitive scientist and Nobel Prize laureate Herbert A. Simon was the first to mention design thinking as a way of thinking in his 1969 book, The Sciences of the Artificial. He then went on to contribute many ideas throughout the 70s which are now regarded as principles of design thinking."

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TAGS

1969 • building ideas • creative thinking • creativity as a process • cybernetics • defining the problem • designdesign methoddesign methods • Design Methods Group • design processDesign Research Unitdesign researcherdesign thinkingdesignerdesigninggame theoryHerbert Simon • improving the future • methodological approach • operational research • problem-solving • quantitative methods • role of the designer • science of design • Sciences of the Artificial (1969) • scientific methods • sociologist • system thinking • systems analysis • thought process • way of thinking

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 SEPTEMBER 2015

Design for Action: designing the immaterial artefact

"Throughout most of history, design was a process applied to physical objects. Raymond Loewy designed trains. Frank Lloyd Wright designed houses. Charles Eames designed furniture. Coco Chanel designed haute couture. Paul Rand designed logos. David Kelley designed products, including (most famously) the mouse for the Apple computer.

But as it became clear that smart, effective design was behind the success of many commercial goods, companies began employing it in more and more contexts. High-tech firms that hired designers to work on hardware (to, say, come up with the shape and layout of a smartphone) began asking them to create the look and feel of user-interface software. Then designers were asked to help improve user experiences. Soon firms were treating corporate strategy making as an exercise in design. Today design is even applied to helping multiple stakeholders and organizations work better as a system.

This is the classic path of intellectual progress. Each design process is more complicated and sophisticated than the one before it. Each was enabled by learning from the preceding stage. Designers could easily turn their minds to graphical user interfaces for software because they had experience designing the hardware on which the applications would run. Having crafted better experiences for computer users, designers could readily take on nondigital experiences, like patients' hospital visits. And once they learned how to redesign the user experience in a single organization, they were more prepared to tackle the holistic experience in a system of organizations."

(Tim Brown and Roger Martin, 2015, Harvard Business Review)

A version of this article appeared in the September 2015 issue (pp.56–64) of Harvard Business Review.

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TAGS

Bill BuxtonCharles EamesCoco Chanelcomplex systems • David Kelley • design history • design intervention • design processdesign thinking • design-oriented approach • design-oriented thinkingdesigned artefactethnographic design approachFrank Lloyd Wright • genuinely innovative strategies • graphical user interfaceHarvard Business ReviewHerbert Simon • holistic user experience • IDEOimmateriality • intervention design • iPoditerative prototyping • iterative rapid-cycle prototyping • iTunes Store • Jeff Hawkins • look and feellow-fidelity prototype • low-resolution prototype • nondigital experiences • PalmPilot • Paul Randpersonal digital assistantphysical objectsrapid prototyping • Raymond Loewy • redesignRichard Buchananrole of the designerservice designuser experienceuser experience design (UX)user feedbackuser interface designwicked problems

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 JANUARY 2013

Science depends on interpretation, community and tradition

"The beacons of the philosophy of science include Karl Popper, Thomas Kuhn, Paul Feyerabend, and Bruno Latour who refute scientism from various angles: arguing that scientific observations are theory and value laden, science takes place within communities, science can be anarchic, etc, all suggesting that science is as dependent on processes of interpretation, community, and tradition as any aspect of the humanities."

(Richard Coyne, 2011)

Excerpted from a letter to the editor, first published in ARQ: Richard Coyne (2011). What's science got to do with it?. Architectural Research Quarterly, 15 , pp 205–206, doi:10.1017/S135913551100073X

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2011anarchic • Architectural Research Quarterly • ARQ • Baruch SpinozaBruno Latour • Chris Argyris • codify • Donald Schon • encyclopaedism • externality • General Systems Theory • GST • Herbert SimonJohn DeweyKarl Popper • letter to the editor • logical positivism • Ludwig von Bertalanffy • optimistic scientism • Paul Feyerabend • Peter Ramus • philosophy of sciencerationalityresearch culturesRichard Coynescience • science communities • science interpretation • scientific knowledgescientific observationsscientific traditionscientismsystematisationsystems theorytechnology as neutralThomas Kuhnvalue ladenVienna Circle

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 MARCH 2012

Integrating the process of design thinking into the classroom

"When you think of design thinking, think of innovative outcomes – like the iPod, or that perfect peeler that both cuts well and has an amazing grip, or the Aravind Eye Care system that allows for thousands of underresourced families in India to address cataract issues.

Pioneers of design thinking called it the process of 'a practical, creative resolution of problems or issues that looks for an improved future result' (Simon, 1969). Recently, educational researchers have been asking what happens when educators integrate the process of design thinking into the classroom. Their findings include numerous examples of enhanced student learning."

(Mount Vernon Institute for Innovation, Mount Vernon Presbyterian School, Atlanta)

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TAGS

21st centurybetter-functioning productschildrenclassroomcollaborationcomplexity • constructivist theories of learning • convergent thinking • creative resolution of problems • creativitycreativity skillscritical thinking • D.E.E.P. • design approach • design innovationdesign responsibilitydesign thinking • design thinking approach • design thinking in classroomdesign-based learningdesign-oriented thinking • deviate from facts • Discover Empathise Experiment Produce • divergent thinkingeducationeducatoreffective communication • enhanced student learning • experimentation • exploring possibilities • hands on • Herbert Simon • innovative outcomes • K-4 • know-how • learning as a social activity • multidisciplinary teams • MVPS • pedagogyproblem-oriented thinkingproblem-solvingproduct design • science concepts • science lab • scripted approach to enquiry • socio-technological dimensionssolving problemsspeculative designstudent achievementteaching science • traditional learning frameworks

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 MAY 2011

Practicing Theory (or : Did Practice Kill Theory ?)

"Designerly ways of knowing, reflection in action/reflection on action, tacit knowledge, the language of things etc. The theoretical dimension of design research is usually described in numerous and various ways that tend to subsume in elegant formulas the complex relationships between designers and thinkers. Many design research bibliographies show a tendency to overquote a set of common references that could be perceived as the doxa of design research – either in the French theory (Deleuze, Baudrillard), or in the fashionable sociology of systems (Latour, Tarde) or the pragmatic approach (Schön, Simon, Dewey).

The Swiss Design Network one–day Symposium of 2011 Practicing Theory aims at understanding what are the real theoretical contexts of designers practicing design research, how these theoretical backgrounds are formed, explored and broaden, and what use is made of them in the everyday practice of a research project in design. Not only will we seek to understand where from designers think, but also in what directions their research could possibly push the activity of thinking. The aim is not to re–design the ideal library of design thinking, but on the contrary to interrogate the dialog that design research establishes with the historical discourse disciplines such as philosophy, sociology, semiotics or cognitive theories."

(Genève, University of Art and Design Geneva, 2011)

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TAGS

2011action research • activity of thinking • Bruno Latourcognitive theories • common references • critical positioning • critical theorydesign discoursedesign practicedesign researchdesign research projectdesign theorydesign thinking • designer researchers • designerly waysdesignerly ways of knowingdesignersDonald Schon • doxa • everyday practice • French theory • Gabriel TardeGeneva • Geneve • Gilles DeleuzeHerbert Simon • heterodoxy • historical discourse • Jean BaudrillardJohn Deweylanguage of thingsorthodoxyphilosophypractice-basedpracticing theory • pragmatic approach • reflection-on-actionsemioticssociology • sociology of systems • Swiss Design Networksymposiumtacit knowledgetheoretical context • theoretical landscape • theoretical reflection

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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