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Which clippings match 'Narrative Framing' keyword pg.1 of 1
25 OCTOBER 2012

Storyville: Exploring narratives of learning and teaching, the 2nd annual HEA Arts and Humanities conference, 2013

Date: 29 May 2013 – 30 May 2013

Location/venue: Thistle Brighton, King's Road, Brighton, England, BN1 2GS

The Higher Education Academy's second annual learning and teaching Arts and Humanities conference, 'Storyville: Exploring narratives of learning and teaching' will take place on 29–30 May 2013 in Brighton.

"At the heart of the Arts and Humanities disciplines sit stories–stories which create and recreate worlds, distant and present, stories which inspire and engage, stories which grow imaginations and expand what is thinkable.

Stories are everywhere, and our second annual conference seeks to explore the intersections between narrative and learning and teaching..."

(Higher Education Academy, UK)

TAGS

2013academic identitiesanthologyarchivearts and humanities • assessing creatively • conference • create and recreate worlds • creating stories • curricula designdesigning learning experiencesdisciplinary boundarieseducator • experimental forms • gamifyinggamifying learning and teachingHannah ArendtHEHEAHigher Education Academy • how students learn • how we teach • inspire and engage • Key Information Set (KIS)learning and teachinglearning storiesliterary devicesmetaphormetaphorical representationnaming processnarrative account • narrative and learning • narrative co-creation • narrative framingnarratives of discovery • narratives we teach by • National Student Survey • our stories • pedagogypractice narrativesrehearsal • research-based teaching • sharing stories • social presence • stories • storyville • student journey • students as partners • teaching and learning • teaching methodologies • teaching-based research • telling storiestravelogue • tweeting • tweetsUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 AUGUST 2012

Kevin Kelly: screen culture is a world of constant flux

"Screen culture is a world of constant flux, of endless sound bites, quick cuts and half–baked ideas. It is a flow of gossip tidbits, news headlines and floating first impressions. Notions don't stand alone but are massively interlinked to everything else; truth is not delivered by authors and authorities but is assembled by the audience. Screen culture is fast, like a 30–sec. movie trailer, and as liquid and open–ended as a website. ...

On a screen, words move, meld into pictures, change color and perhaps even meaning. Sometimes there are no words at all, only pictures or diagrams or glyphs that may be deciphered into multiple meanings. This is terribly unnerving to any civilization based on text logic."

(Kevin Kelly, 19 June 2000, "Will We Still Turn Pages", Time Magazine)

Fig.1 JasKaitlin "hypermediacy" taken on April 25, 2010 using an Apple iPhone 3GS [http://www.flickr.com/photos/64776338@N07/5996281055/].

1

TAGS

200021st centuryaudienceauthorised voiceauthorityauthorshipbook • classic logic of books • cohesive narratives • constant flux • credibility • cultural change • double screening • dual screening • endlessly tweakable • fast action • first impressions • flowfragmentaryfragmentation • framing narrative • gossiphalf-baked ideashypermediacyinformation in contextinterconnectedness • interlinked • Kevin Kellyliquid • meanings change • multi-tabbing • multiple meanings • narrative framingnon-linearopen-ended • people of the book • people of the screen • quick cutsreflexive modernityscreen culturesensemakingsound bitesynthesise knowledge • text logic • tidbitsTime Magazine • traditional narratives • turning pages • various contexts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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