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Which clippings match 'Seeing' keyword pg.1 of 1
09 JUNE 2013

Sketch-thinking: the processes of 'seeing as' and 'seeing that'

"Sketches are obviously pictorial, for they refer to shape and orientation, and often to approximate size even if they maintain a varying degree of abstractness. Yet it is impossible to confirm that there is a direct one–to–one correspondence between shapes and figures on paper and the images they stand for. It is therefore proposed to refer to the (pictorial) reasoning evident in interactive imagery at the time of sketching as consisting of two modalities. The designer is 'seeing as' when he or she is using figural, or 'gestalt' argumentation while 'sketch–thinking'. When 'seeing that', the designer advances no figural arguments pertaining to the entity that is being designed. The process of sketching is a systematic dialectics between the 'seeing as' and 'seeing that' reasoning modalities. To examine this proposition, design moves and arguments were inspected as they are established through protocol analysis. The notion of 'seeing as' and 'seeing that' will be further elucidated as we proceed, so as to best exploit documentation from the protocols."

(Gabriela Goldschmidt 1991, p.131)

Goldschmidt, G. (1991). "The dialectics of sketching." Creativity Research Journal, Routledge 4(2): 123–143.

Fig.1 Donald Owen Colley [http://buttnekkiddoodles.com/2012/12/26/knockin–about–chicago/]

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TAGS

1991abstract thinking • abstractness • concept developmentconcept generationconceptual schemeconceptualisation • concrete thinking • creativity research • Creativity Research Journal • design • design reasoning • design thinkingdrawingdrawing as enquiry • drawing research • drawing studiesdrawing study • figural • figural arguments • Gabriela Goldschmidt • gestalt argumentation • gestalt principlesidea generationinteractive imagery • Israel Institute of Technology • pictorial reasoning • problem-solvingprotocol analysis • reasoning modalities • reflexive technology • seeingseeing asseeing that • sequence of design moves • shape and orientation • sketch-thinkingsketchessketchingsketching ideas • systematic dialectics • visual thinking

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 FEBRUARY 2012

The Intimate Photograph: what does intimacy mean in visual terms?

"The goal of this class is to articulate and explore what intimacy means in visual terms. We will try and assemble a rhetorical rather than a purely emotional guide to the photograph's intimate claims. In the end, we may come to the conclusion that intimacy cannot be photographed directly (as we experience it) because, quite simply, the camera is always in the way. The trick, perhaps, is to understand intimacy as an imaginary space –– an illusion that exploits our very real longing for a profound and authentic encounter with another."

(Doug Dubois, 2010)

Fig.1 Doug Dubois (2003). "My Mother's Scar", Gloucester, Massachusetts.

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TAGS

Berlin • digitalfotografie • dokumentarfotografie • Doug Dubois • facial nuanceforensic detail • foto • fotografie • fotokurs • fotokurse • intimacyintimate imageobservationphotographic portrait • photographic visual language • photographie • photographyportraitportraiturereal-lifeseeingsubtletyvisual languagewatching

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 OCTOBER 2011

Laban Movement Analysis: qualitative aspects of nonverbal behaviour

"Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) originated in the work of Rudolf Laban, and has evolved into a highly detailed practical system that describes qualitative aspects of nonverbal behavior. In its current development, it operates as a phenomenology of movement and mind, as it requires that the observer look at the movement itself, prior to interpretation and without prejudice, while acknowledging the intrinsic connection between movement and subjective experience. Movement Analysis increases kinesthetic sensitivity for the observer, because it places in the foreground of the observer's experience, those aspects of movement which are individual–specific: that is, those movement choices which an individual makes within a particular context. Movement Analysis as a system of observation assumes that a significant degree of individual freedom in movement quality is always present within biological, cultural, and contextually defined bodily repertoires."

(Janet Kaylo)

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TAGS

attunementbodies in spacebodily engagement • bodily repertoires • body experiencechoreographycorporealdance performance • dance therapy • everyday movementexpressive repertoirefigures in spaceforensic detail • freedom of movement • intimacyintimateintimate movement • kinaesthetic sensitivity • kinesthetic • kinesthetic participation • kinetic exchange • Laban Movement Analysis • language for describing movement • LMA • movementmovement analysis • movement analysis methodology • movement and subjective experience • movement efficiency • movement experience • movement life • movement lives • movement performance • movement quality • movement vocabulary • nonverbal behaviourobservationpatterns of movement • phenomenology of mind • phenomenology of movement • physical presenceposturepuppetryreal-life • Rudolf Laban • seeing • seeing another • sensitivity to others • sensory abilitysubtlety • system of observation • theatre performance • therapeutic • understanding movementwatching

CONTRIBUTOR

Elisza Ribeiro
12 MAY 2011

John Berger: Ways of Seeing

"Published in 1972 and based on a BBC television programme of the same name, this is a very influential text on art criticism. Although the book and programme make the same case, they do so in slightly different ways, and the programme is well worth watching. For the photographer, the book has the advantage of putting photography in the context of western art. For the student new to critical theory, it has the advantage of being produced for a mass audience, and has as a central aim the de–mystification of art. These two points make it relatively easy to understand. A further advantage this book has is that many students have not had the opportunity to study photography, but have studied art, and so the book presents a logical progression for them when they start to study photography.

The television programme is divided into four sections and although the book is divided into seven chapters (three being made up solely of images), the book also covers four areas."

(John Berger, 1990)

John Berger (1990). 'Ways of Seeing: Based on the BBC Television Series', Penguin

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TAGS

1972academic discourse • advertising photography • artart criticismauthorshipBBC • buying power • commercialisationconnoisseurshipconsumerism • demystifying • John Bergermass audiencemeaningmechanical reproduction • modern consumerist society • nude in western artobjectification of women • objectified women • oil painting • photographic reproduction • photographypictorial reproduction • power of money • publicity • realismrepresentationseeingsocial constructionismspectacletelevision documentarytelevision programmetraditionvisual culturevisual depictionvisual languagevisual literacyvisual representational strategiesWays of Seeingwestern art • what we know

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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