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Which clippings match 'Feelings' keyword pg.1 of 1
29 NOVEMBER 2012

Psychical Distance: characters and situations in drama are unreal

"One of the best known examples is to be found in our attitude towards the events and characters of the drama; they appeal to us like persons and incidents of normal experience, except that that side of their appeal, which would usually affect us in a directly personal manner, is held in abeyance. This difference, so well known as to be almost trivial, is generally explained by reference to the knowledge that the characters and situations are 'unreal,' imaginary. In this sense Witasek, oeprating with Meinong's theory of Annahem, has described the emotions involved in witnessing a drama as Scheingefuhle, a term which has so frequently been misunderstood in discussions of his theories. But, as a matter of fact, the 'assumption' upon which the imaginative emotional reaction is based is not necessarily the condition, but often the consequence, of distance; that is to say, the converse of the reason usually stated would then be true: viz. That distance, by changing our relation to the characters, renders them seemingly fictitious, not that the fictitiousness of the characters alters our feelings toward them. It is, of course, to be granted that the actual and admitted unreality of the dramatic action reinforces the effect of Distance. But surely the proverbial unsophisticated yokel whose chivalrous interference in the play on behalf of the hapless heroine can only be prevented by impressing upon him that 'they are only pretending,' is not the ideal type of theatrical audience. The proof of the seeming paradox that it is Distance which primarily gives to dramatic action the appearance of unreliability and not vice versa, is the observation that the same filtration of our sentiments and the same seeming 'unreality' of actual men and things occur, when at times, by a sudden change of inward perspective, we are overcome by the feeling that 'all the world's a stage.'"

(Edward Bullough, 1912)

Edward Bullough (1912). "Psychical Distance" British Journal of Psychology, Vol. 5, pp. 87–117 (excerpt cited by Julie Van Camp, 22 November 2006).

Fig.1 Patricia Piccinini/Drome Pty Ltd. (2010) [http://leecasey.carbonmade.com/projects/2594595#9]

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TAGS

1912aesthetics • Alexius Meinong • all the worlds a stage • Annahem • appeal • appearance of unreliability • audiencebelievabilitybreaking the fourth wallchanging our relationcharactersdirect experience • distance • distanced viewpointdrama • dramatic action • dramatic space • Edward Bullough • emotionemotional immersionemotional involvementempathyfeelings • fictitious • fictitiousnessheld in abeyanceimaginary • imaginative emotional reaction • normal experience • only pretending • our sentiments • pathospersonalpropinquitypsychical distancepsychological closeness • psychological proximity • Scheingefuhle • Stephan Witasek • suspension of disbelief • theatrical audience • unreal • unreal characters • unreal situations • unreality • verisimilitude • witnessing • yoke

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 MAY 2011

Sadie Benning's Fisher Price PXL-2000 confessions

"Eighteen–year–old Sadie Benning recorded thoughts and images, from 1989–92, of her nascent lesbianism with the help of a Fisher Price Pixelvision camera. Portrays the space of Sadie's bedroom, scrawled notes, and defiant expressions which mark her confessional, in–your–face style."

(Duke University Libraries)

Sadie Benning (1990). 'If Every Girl Had a Diary', video (black and white, sound), 8 min. Purchase. © 2011 Sadie Benning. Courtesy Video Data Bank

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TAGS

1990adolescent sexuality • audio cassette • authorship • B&W • black and whitecamerachronicle • coming out • confession • despair • diarydocumentary filmfeelingsfemale sexuality • Fischer-Price PXL-2000 camera • Fisher Price • gay and lesbian • gender • gender issues • girlidentity • If Every Girl Had a Diary • innocenceintimate livesisolationlesbian • lesbian identity • nascent sexuality • outpouringsoutsiderpersonal • pixelvision camera • queerqueer cinema • queer experience • queerness • revelatory • rough quality • Sadie Benning • self-shotssexual orientation • social prejudice • tapeteen • teenage • teenage diary • videoVideo Data Bank

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 JULY 2006

Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats

"Six Thinking Hats is a simple, effective parallel thinking process that helps people be more productive, focused, and mindfully involved. And once learned, the tools can be applied immediately!

You and your team members can learn how to separate thinking into six clear functions and roles. Each thinking role is identified with a colored symbolic 'thinking hat.' By mentally wearing and switching 'hats,' you can easily focus or redirect thoughts, the conversation, or the meeting.

The White Hat calls for information known or needed. 'The facts, just the facts.' :: The Yellow Hat symbolizes brightness and optimism. Under this hat you explore the positives and probe for value and benefit. :: The Black Hat is judgment – the devil's advocate or why something may not work. Spot the difficulties and dangers :: where things might go wrong. Probably the most powerful and useful of the Hats but a problem if overused. :: The Red Hat signifies feelings, hunches and intuition. When using this hat you can express emotions and feelings and share fears, likes, dislikes, loves, and hates. :: The Green Hat focuses on creativity :: the possibilities, alternatives, and new ideas. It's an opportunity to express new concepts and new perceptions. :: The Blue Hat is used to manage the thinking process. It's the control mechanism that ensures the Six Thinking Hats guidelines are observed."

(The de Bono Group)

Edward De Bono (1985). "Six Thinking Hats", ISBN 0–316–17831–4.

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ability to focusabstract representationabstract representationsabstraction • abstraction in problem solving and learning • abstractions for problem solving • alternatives • blackbluecolour • control mechanism • creativitydecision makingdesign methoddesign methodsdesign team • difficulties and dangers • distinct functions • distinct roles • Edward de Bonofactsfeelings • focus thoughts • green • group discussion • hat • hats • high performance thinkinghunches • individual thinking • intuitionjudgmentmethods for design practice • mindfully involved • new ideas • parallel thinking • parallel thinking process • possibilities • problem abstractionproblem-solvingproductivityred • redirect thoughts • role playingseparate thinkingSix Thinking Hatssymbolism • the facts • thinking • thinking hat • thinking process • thinking role • thinking tooltooltools for thinkingvalue and benefitways of thinking • wearing • whiteyellow

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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