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Which clippings match 'House' keyword pg.1 of 3
30 MARCH 2014

Work begins on the world's first 3D-printed house

"At the centre of the process is the KamerMaker, or Room Builder, a scaled–up version of an open–source home 3D–printer, developed with Dutch firm Ultimaker. It uses the same principle of extruding layers of molten plastic, only enlarged about 10 times, from printing desktop trinkets to chunks of buildings up to 2x2x3.5m high.

For a machine–made material, the samples have an intriguingly hand–made finish. In places, it looks like bunches of black spaghetti. There are lumps and bumps, knots and wiggles, seams where the print head appears to have paused or slipped, spurting out more black goo than expected.

'We're still perfecting the technology,' says Heinsman. The current material is a bio–plastic mix, usually used as an industrial adhesive, containing 75% plant oil and reinforced with microfibres. They have also produced tests with a translucent plastic and a wood fibre mix, like a liquid form of MDF that can later be sawn and sanded. 'We will continue to test over the next three years, as the technology evolves,' she says. 'With a second nozzle, you could print multiple materials simultaneously, with structure and insulation side by side.'"

(Oliver Wainwright, 28 March 2014, The Guardian)

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TAGS

20143D printing • 3D-printed house • Amsterdamarchitecture • biodegradable materials • black spaghetti • brickbuilding process • canal • canal house • computer-controlled gantry • contour crafting • cyberarchitecturedesign futuresdigital fabricationdigital forming • Dus Architects • dwellingfabrication • gable • honeycomb lattice • honeycomb structurehouse • housebuilding • housing • Janjaap Ruijssenaars • KamerMake • lattice • liquorice • machine-made material • made on-demandmanufacturingMDFmobius stripnew crafts • novelty technology • oozingplant oilplastic • plastic facade • print structures • printingrapid manufacturing • Room Builder • synthetic sandstone • technological developmentsThe Guardian • treacle • Ultimaker • wood fibre

CONTRIBUTOR

Linda Carroli
20 JANUARY 2014

The Lake House: narrative film that exploits circular structure

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TAGS

2006across time • Alejandro Agresti • between past and presentcausality • Christopher Plummer • chronological time • circular narrative • circular narrative structure • circular narrative style • circularitycontemporary present • correspondence • David Auburn • deathdoghouse • Il Mare (2000) • Keanu Reeves • lake • letter writinglove storymailbox • melancholia • passage of time • Persuasion (Jane Austen) • plot structuresportal (science fiction)remaking film • romantic drama • Sandra Bullock • separate points in time • simultaneityspeculative fiction • The Lake House (2006) • time

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 MARCH 2011

A house is a symbolic place that regulates privacy

"A house is a symbolic place combining paradoxical concepts that can easily be identified as 'binary codes.' Internal and external, private and public, female and male, sacred and profane, clean and dirty are binary codes used to explain roles and activities of people in spaces (Lawrence, 1990; Ünlü, 1999). The spatial configuration of house layouts may be different in different periods, regions, cultures, and societies. Societies establish order in their livelihood spaces and reflect their personalities in these spaces.

There is a mutual relationship between space and human relations. The differences in social systems reveal morphological diversity in house layouts. The family contains the socio–economical structure of society; although it is a small element, it is the cornerstone that forms the future of society. The family needs a specific space, a house, to achieve this function based on their characteristics and the desired level of privacy (Sungur and Çagdas, 2003).

Privacy is a dynamic topological property of space; therefore, it should be approached in an analogous manner. Spaces could be categorized not only depending on their degree of privacy, but also according to their capacity to regulate privacy. At the same time, complementary approach counters the strict categorization of spaces into either public or private. According to that point of view, architectural space and its various elements should act as regulators of privacy. Space and its elements should be able to increase or decrease privacy according to the customized needs of its occupants (Georgiou, 2006).

Robinson (2001) identified different zones of privacy within a single Midwestern house and pinpointed their importance for the individual. Robinson argues that through a series of spaces with different degrees of privacy, the autonomy of the resident within a small social group is provided. Furthermore, the individual is granted a large measure of control over time, space, activity, and social interaction."

(Faris Ali Mustafa, Ahmad Sanusi Hassan and Salahaddin Yasin Baper, August 2010)

Faris Ali Mustafa, Ahmad Sanusi Hassan and Salahaddin Yasin Baper (2011). 'Institutional Space, Domestic Space, and Power Relations: Revisiting territoriality with space syntax', Asian Social Science, Vol. 6, No. 8, ISSN 1911–2025 (Online), Canadian Center of Science and Education

TAGS

architectural space • clean • degrees of privacy • designdesign formalismdirtydwelling • external space • functional design • habitationhousehuman relations • interior • interior architectureinterior design • internal space • intimacy gradients • layoutmorphologyplaceprivacyprivateprofaneregulationsacredsacred spacessequence of spacesspacespatial configurationspatial literacysymbolic placeterritorytopology

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 OCTOBER 2010

Simple Houses: making a new house attainable for first-home buyers

"The [Aotearoa New Zealand] government has opened its first 'simple house' today, its answer to streamlining the design and build process to allow first–home buyers affordable housing.

Building and Construction Minister Maurice Williamson opened the house designed by Stephen Smith and built by Housing New Zealand in the south Auckland suburb of Otara. ...

'Simple Houses can be built anywhere in New Zealand and the layout can be easily changed to suit owners' needs so residents can get the most of privacy and sun,' Williamson said.

The government's first Simple House had three bedrooms, a large open–plan dining, kitchen and lounge area, a bathroom and study. ...

The government said the new simple house concept would make it quicker and cheaper for aspiring home owners to build a simple home, largely because of streamlined consenting."

(New Zealand Press Association, 22 October 2010)

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TAGS

2010affordableaffordable housingAotearoa New ZealandarchitectureAucklandbuilding processbuilding standardsCanterburycompliance • consentability • construction • Department of Building and Housing • designdesign processdwellinghome ownerhousehousing • Housing New Zealand • innovation • Otara • ownershipresidential livingsimple housesolution • starter home • Starter Home Design Competition • Stephen Smith • Wairarapa

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 JULY 2009

Gabe's Self-Cleaning House

"Some dream of verdant lawns, tennis courts and swimming pools. Ms. Gabe [Frances Grace Arnholtz Bateson], who in 1984 received United States patent No. 4,428,085, now expired, fantasized about a house that could rid itself of dirt and then, over a 12–year period, she actually built it.
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Before the earthquake damage, Ms. Gabe activated her house's self–cleaning mechanisms about twice a year. The concept, she explained, 'was never intended to scrub a dirty house, but to keep a clean house clean.'

The devices still work in the kitchen, where dishes are washed in their places on mesh shelves, and the prison–green walls are waterproof. 'The problem with houses is that they are designed by men,' she said as she showed off the room. 'They put in far too much space and then you have to take care of it.'

Ms. Gabe's patent for Self–Cleaning Building Construction, which hangs on the living room wall, shrouded in plastic wrap, contains 68 separate components. Among them is the Gabe Waterless Self–Cleaning Toilet and the Gabe Self–Cleaning Book Jacket. The most intriguing notion may be the Gabe Washer–Dryer Closet, which washes and dries clothes while they are still on hangers."
(Patricia Leigh Brown, The New York Times, 17 January 2002)

[Rather than focusing on the need to control the domestic environment through a type of digital mediation Gabe's house has been designed to minimise domestic drudgery. This can be seen from a feminist perspective as an act of reterritorialisation where control over the domestic space has been re–framed in terms of a traditional female perspective.]

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TAGS

1984architecture • cleaning • deviceengineeringfeminism • Frances Grace Arnholtz Bateson • GaBe • genderhouseinnovationmediationpioneer • plastic wrap • reterritorialisation • self-cleaning house • solutionspace • waterproof

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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