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Which clippings match 'Hotel' keyword pg.1 of 2
11 JULY 2014

The Phantom of Liberty: humorous critique of bourgeois conventions

"Luis Buñuel's The Phantom of Liberty was quickly dismissed upon its release in 1974. Not only did it have to contend with the lingering success of 1972's similarly themed but significantly less abstract The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie, but it was quickly followed by the dreamlike, bi–polar romantic entanglement of the director's last film, That Obscure Object of Desire. Like Discreet Charm, the plot–free Phantom of Liberty is a patchwork of comedic sketches and sight gags through which Buñuel ravages a complacent European culture and the various sexual hang–ups and historical and cultural disconnects of its inhabitants. This heady, almost off–putting masterwork isn't particularly easy to decipher (maybe we aren't meant to), which is why it's best to approach it as a literal comedy of manners.

Films structured around daisy chains of dysfunction are a dime a dozen; most, though, are as tiresomely long–winded as they are content with their own strained circularity. This isn't the case with Phantom of Liberty, which begins with a shot of Goya's 1808 masterpiece 'The Third of May.' The painting depicts Napoleon's army executing a group of faceless Spaniards, and via a reenactment of this struggle, Buñuel depicts how one of Napoleon's captains tries to defile the monument of Doña Elvira only to be smacked on the head by the moving arm of the statue of the woman's husband. (He later intends to sleep with the woman's corpse, and when he opens her coffin, he's amazed by how her beauty has been preserved.) It's the first of many sight gags in the film, each and every one as startling as they are perversely funny. All these moments are possessed by a sense of shocked wonderment and discovery, and they all more or less evoke fragile pasts and characters trying to reconcile their historical detachments."

(Ed Gonzalez, 13 September 2003, Slant Magazine)

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1974absurd situationsabsurdist humourabsurdity • Adolfo Celi • Adriana Asti • Anne-Marie Deschott • apparition • Arch de Triomphe • archaic rules • Bernard Verley • black humour • bourgeois • bourgeoise societycancer • chance encounter • cigarettes • Claude Pieplu • coffin • comedic sketches • comedycomedy of mannerscorpsecritiquecultural conventionscultural pastdaughterdining practicesdinner tabledisappearancedoctor • Dona Elvira • eatingepisodic structureetiquetteEuropean cinema • European culture • faith • Francois Maistre • girl • Goya • Helene Perdriere • hotel • housemaid • humour • impulses • internal logic • intrusion • Jean Rochefort • Jean-Claude Brialy • Julien Bertheau • Le Fantome de la Liberte (1974) • Luis Bunuel • mailman • masterwork • Michael Lonsdale • Michel Piccoli • Milena Vukotic • Monica Vitti • Montparnasse • morality • nanny • narrative preconceptions • obscene • ostrich • parodypatchwork • Paul Frankeur • phallicphallic symbol • Philippe Brigaud • Pierre Maguelon • policepolite societypostcard • postman • psychoanalysisritual • rooster • rulesschool • schoolchildren • Serge Silberman • sexual hang-ups • sexual taboo • sight gag • sketch comedy • sniper • social behavioursocial conventionsSpanish filmsubconscioussurrealist cinemasurrealist filmmakertaboo • That Obscure Object of Desire (1977) • The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972) • The Phantom of Liberty (1974) • The Third of May (1808) • toilettriptych • vanished • visual gagzoo

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 SEPTEMBER 2013

Holiday Inn Express: ad illustrates split between real/online identities

"Intercontinental Hotels Group (IHG) is launching the first UK television advertisement for Holiday Inn Express to raise awareness of the added value services that differentiate the brand in the crowded mid–priced hotel market."

(Russell Parsons, 9 September 2013, Marketing Week)

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2013added value • added value services • brand differentiation • breakfast • business traveller • Centaur Communications Ltd • comparisonconstructed identitiesdigital identity • Holiday Inn Express • hotel • hotel market • Intercontinental Hotels Group (IHG) • leisure industriesliving digital lives • Marketing Week (site) • mid-price market • online and offlineonline and real world identities • pastel shades • Premier Inn • price point • social media identitiessplit-screen • toothbrush • tv adUKUSPWiFi

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 OCTOBER 2011

Dead Island: a holiday paradise gone mad

"The player is drawn into the world of Dead Island on the brink of a mysterious epidemic that suddenly, and without warning, breaks out on the fictional island of Banoi. As a guest of the Royal Palms Resort, the player's stay was supposed to be a dream holiday; a luxurious getaway to the beautiful beaches of a tropical paradise. But faced with the reality of a zombie apocalypse, there is only one thing left to do: Survive."

(Deep Silver Inc.)

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2011apocalypse • atmosphere design • Banoi • beach • Bedlam • CGchaos • co-operative play • Dead Island • Deep Silver Inc. • dream holiday • epidemic • escape the island • fictional island • first-person • first-person action • game • gruesome zombies • holiday • holiday paradise • horrorhotellighting • luxurious • madnessmysteriousmysterious outbreakopen worldPlaystation 3 • Royal Palms Resort • RPGslasherstory-based experienceterrortexturingtrailer • tropical island • tropical paradise • uninfected • vacation • VFXviolencevisual effects • weapon customisation • Xbox 360zombie • zombie apocalypse • zombie outbreak • zombie-slasher

CONTRIBUTOR

Jade Oakley
19 JANUARY 2011

Madonna's Justify My Love: beautiful black and white shallow focus

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1990 • Bandits Productions • beautifulbisexualbisexualityblack and whitebreakbeatcinematographycontroversialdance • drum break • explicit sexual images • female sexualityglamourhaving sexhotel • hotel hallway • Ingrid Chavez • James Brown • Jean-Baptiste Mondino • Jeanne Moreau • Justify My Love • Lenny Kravitz • Madonna • music singlesmusic video • Pascal Lebegue • Philippe Dupuis-Mendel • Propaganda Films • Public Enemy • sadomasochismselective focussex • sexually seduced • shallow depth of fieldshallow focus • singer-songwriter • Sire Records • songTony Ward • trip-hop • voyeurismwhisper

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 MAY 2010

I Met The Walrus: Animated John Lennon Interview

"n 1969, a 14–year–old Beatle fanatic named Jerry Levitan, armed with a reel–to–reel tape deck, snuck into John Lennon's hotel room in Toronto and convinced John to do an interview. This was in the midst of Lennon's "bed–in" phase, during which John and Yoko were staying in hotel beds in an effort to promote peace. 38 years later, Jerry has produced a film about it. Using the original interview recording as the soundtrack, director Josh Raskin has woven a visual narrative which tenderly romances Lennon's every word in a cascading flood of multipronged animation. Raskin marries traditional pen sketches by James Braithwaite with digital illustration by Alex Kurina, resulting in a spell–binding vessel for Lennon's boundless wit, and timeless message."

(Josh Raskin)

Fig.1 'I Met The Walrus' (2007). Josh Raskin – Animator, Josh Raskin – Director, Josh Raskin – Editor, Josh Raskin – Composer (Music Score), Alex Kurina – Cinematographer, James Braithwaite Computer Illustrations – Cinematographer, Jerry Levitan – Producer, Josh Raskin – Screenwriter, James Braithwaite – Illustrator, Alex Kurina – Illustrator [6 minutes].

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14 year old • 19692D2D animation • Alex Kurina • animationdigital illustrationdrawingfilmhotel • I Met The Walrus • illustrationillustrative styleinterviewJames Braithwaite • Jerry Levitan • John Lennon • Josh Raskin • motion designmotion graphicspeacepen sketchesreel-to-reelsequence designtape deckThe BeatlesTorontovisual communicationvisual designvisual narrativevisualisationYoko Ono

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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