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07 AUGUST 2012

PIXELS: invasion of New York by 8-bit video game pixels

New York invasion by 8–bits creatures ! PIXELS is Patrick Jean' latest short film, shot on location in New York. Written, directed by : Patrick Jean Director of Photograhy : Matias Boucard SFX by Patrick Jean and guests Produced by One More Production www.onemoreprod.com

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TAGS

8-bit • 8-bits creatures • animationAtari • Brooklyn Bridge • cloudCommodorecreaturecultural literacy • cultural reference • digital culture • Donkey Kong • formal conceit • Frogger • invasionKing Kong • Matias Boucard • New York • NYC Subway • One More Production (agency) • Pac-Manparodypastiche • Patrick Jean • pixelpixelartpixelationpixellation • PIXELS (film) • Pongself-referentialSFXshort filmSpace InvadersTetrisvideo gamevideogamesvisual conventionsvisual vernacular

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 AUGUST 2012

A Game with No Rules: rear projected Kiwi short film melodrama

"A trio of future Kiwi screen stars smoke, smoulder, steal – and worse – in Scott Reynolds' serpentine short noir. Kane (Marton Csokas) and his Zambesi–clad woman on the side (Danielle Cormack) set about ripping off Kane's rich wife (Jennifer Ward–Lealand) with bloody results. Writer/director Scott Reynolds and longtime partner in crime, cinematographer Simon Raby, serve notice of their talents – and inspirations – with heady lighting, deliberately shonky back projection, and opening titles right out of Hitchcock [Saul Bass inspired]. Muso Greg Johnson supplies the horns."

(NZ On Screen)

Fig.1 Scott Reynolds/Zee Films (1994), "A Game with No Rules" Aotearoa New Zealand, 35mm 16 minutes.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 JUNE 2012

College for Creative Studies: 1 in 5 Teenagers Will Experiment With Art

"College for Creative Studies's (CCS's) 'PSA' campaign, launched in September, has recently gone viral with more than 1,000,000 hits and shares on various social networking and blogging sites including Facebook and Twitter. Created by advertising agency, Team Detroit (Dearborn, MI), the campaign loosely parodies popular anti–drug campaigns from the 1980s and 90s. This light–hearted approach is intended to help recruit potential students to CCS...

'We understand that applying to an art and design College requires a serious commitment on the part of students and families. There is a competitive entry process and we offer students a rigorous education while providing graduates with a solid career trajectory,' says CCS President Richard L. Rogers. 'With this campaign we are able to convey a serious message in an amusing manner. We are grateful to Team Detroit for spearheading this great effort with their stellar pro–bono work. It is particularly impactful that CCS alumni Vic Quattrin, Brandi Keeler and Michael Burdick helped to develop the campaign.'

The entire campaign is supported by a fully–integrated marketing effort including print, broadcast, outdoor, cinema and online advertisements with the tagline, 'Talk to your kids about art school: a message from the College for Creative Studies.' It went viral due to a post from the Tulsa Oklahoma based Philbrook Museum of Art's Facebook page.

'As an institution that strongly embraces social media and its growing potential, we are always looking for compelling content to share with our online communities. This campaign certainly struck a chord with us on a humorous level, but it is the underlying sentiment and advocacy for the arts as a viable career path that made this campaign special. It was such a pleasure to play a part in this viral phenomenon,' says Online Communities Manager Jeff Martin, Philbrook Museum of Art."

(College for Creative Studies, Detroit)

[The 'PSA' campaign exploits the visual vernacular of public information campaigns such as the Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.)]

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TAGS

1980s1990s2011ad campaignadvertising campaignadvocacy for the arts • anti-drug campaign • anti-drugs • art and designart and design careersart and design collegeart and design schoolart studentsarts advocacyBFA • broadcast campaign • career path • career trajectory • CCS • cinema campaign • College for Creative Studies • compelling content to share • DARE • Detroit • Drug Abuse Resistance Education • fully-integrated marketing • gone viralhumourintertextuality • lighthearted • marketing campaignMFA • online advertisements • online campaign • outdoor campaign • parody • Philbrook Museum of Art • print campaign • pro bono • PSApublic informationpublic service announcementrecruitment • students and families • talk to your kids about art schoolTeam Detroit • Tulsa Oklahoma • vernacular • viable career path • viral marketingvisual vernacularwent viral

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 MAY 2011

Monkey Magazine: a new publishing vernacular?

"In the future, as depicted in the 2002 film Minority Report, our periodicals will create interactive, hybrid reading/viewing experiences–with built–in sound and motion–based commercials rather than static advertisements, incorporating news footage with pages that dissolve and re–form to reflect breaking stories. Despite minute gestures in that direction, such as the Amazon Kindle and G24, The Guardian's PDF newspaper that's updated throughout the day, that vision of media–if there's really a market for it–is a long way off. ...

Nevertheless, something ... is now available weekly from Dennis Publishing, the company that gave the world The Week, Maxim and several other British 'lad magazines' as well as launched their American spin–offs. Monkey is proportioned like a glossy, has an interface that mimics the turning of pages and even has a magazine–like layout: margins, a basic two–column grid, images combined with text and print–like pacing. The difference is that Monkey's text sparkles (literally, if not figuratively), dances and slides onto the page. Many of the photos will turn into movies or slideshows (some rather naughty) when clicked, and on some spreads users can shuffle page elements, substituting one image for another. The format also changes to serve its content. A small mini–magazine with short reviews is digitally 'stitched' into the 'middle' of each issue. Additionally, most advertisements come alive, thanks either to Flash, streaming video or some combination, showing previews of movies or commercials for products framed by the equivalent of a full–page ad.

To be sure, Monkey does nothing that isn't done on other websites, and it has formal predecessors for its page interface–the arty This Is a Magazine, for one, and the webified versions of print glossies from Zinio for another. But unlike the wider web–which has evolved its own vocabulary and conventions for storytelling–and other web magazine predecessors–for which the turn–the–page interface seems a formal conceit–Monkey truly blends old and new media design conventions in a way that is both appalling and appealing."

(Jandos Rothstein, 29 January 2008)

Fig.1 Monkey Magazine, 2011. Dennis Publishing, Issue 183, pp.8,9.

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TAGS

Adobe FlashAIGAAmazon Kindleanimated presentationcelebritycontent formconventions • Dennis Publishing • design aestheticsdesign conventionsdesign for the screendesign vocabulary • digitally stitched • e-zine • ezine • formal conceit • G24 • hybridhybrid experiencehybrid forms • lads mag • magazinemagazine layout • Maxim (magazine) • mens magazine • mini-magazine • Minority Report • Monkey Magazine • motion-based commercials • multimedianaughtynew medianews footagenewspaper • page interface • page metaphorpaginationpastiche • PDF newspaper • pin-upprediction • print glossies • print-like • publishingreading experience • screen dissolve • sexslide showstorytellingstreaming videoThe Guardian • The Week (magazine) • This Is a Magazine • triviaturn-the-page interfaceuser experience design (UX)vernacularviewing experiencevisual communicationvisual languagevisual vernacularweb designweb magazineweb vernacularwebified • webzine • Zinio (magazine)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 DECEMBER 2008

Visual joke used to promote comic book convention

Fig.1 Strip Dagen Houten 22 en 23 Oktober 2005, Euretco Expo Center [http://stripdagen.nl]

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2005adadvertisingAmsterdamBBDOcomic book • comic book convention • design • fart • flatulenceintertextualitymarketingmetaphorvisual depictionvisual jokevisual literacyvisual punvisual vernacularvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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