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23 FEBRUARY 2014

Beautiful Science: Picturing Data, Inspiring Insight

20 February – 26 May 2014, Folio Society Gallery; admission free, London.

"Turning numbers into pictures that tell important stories and reveal the meaning held within is an essential part of what it means to be a scientist. This is as true in today's era of genome sequencing and climate models as it was in the 19th century.

Beautiful Science explores how our understanding of ourselves and our planet has evolved alongside our ability to represent, graph and map the mass data of the time.

From John Snow's plotting of the 1854 London cholera infections on a map to colourful depictions of the tree of life, discover how picturing scientific data provides new insight into our lives."

(The British Library)

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17th century • 1854 • 185819th centurybattlefield • Beautiful Science (exhibition) • big dataBritish Librarycartographychart • cholera • climate models • climate science • colourful depictions • Crimean War • datadata journalismdata visualisation • David McCandless • David Spiegelhalter • diseaseevolutionexhibition • Florence Nightingale • genome • genome sequencing • graph • Great Chain of Being (1617) • hierarchical visualisationhospitalillustrated diagramsinfographicinteractive visualisationinterpret meaningsinterpreting data • Johanna Kieniewicz • John Snow • London • Luke Howard • maps • Martin Krzywinski • mass data • Nigel ShadboltOpen Data Institute • picturing data • picturing scientific data • public health • Robert Fludd • rose diagram • Sally Daviesscience • science collections • science exhibition • seeing is believing • statisticstechnological changetree of lifeturning numbers into meaningvisual interpretationvisual representationvisual representation graphicallyvisual representations of scientific conceptsvisualising dataweather • William Farr • Winton Capita

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 MAY 2013

DRS AGM & Symposium 2013: The Value of Design Research

"You are warmly invited to attend the DRS 2013 AGM and Symposium at Loughborough Design School, UK on Monday 17th June 2013. This year symposium's theme is 'Value of Design Research'. We are fortunate to secure three prominent design researchers to address this year symposium's theme."

(Erik Bohemia)

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2013 • AGM • clamshell devices • collaborative research project • Daria Loi • design researchDesign Research SocietyDRS • emergency ambulances • ethnographically informed study • Georgina Follett • health carehospitalIntel CorporationLoughborough • Loughborough Design School • Loughborough University • paramedic equipment • Sue Hignett • symposiumUK • Ultrabook • University of Dundee • UX innovation • V and AVictoria and Albert Museum

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 NOVEMBER 2012

One of A Kind: a childs guide to Radiotherapy

"Young cancer patients have told their stories in a cartoon that shows children and parents what it is like to have treatment. The six children, who received radiotherapy in Bristol, teamed up with the animation house Aardman for the production called One of a Kind! Their voices were recorded and given to the animated characters in the short film. It will be made available to hospitals all over the UK. The cartoon was the idea of Jancis Kinsman, advanced practice therapy radiographer at Bristol Haematology and Oncology Centre."
(15 June 2010, BBC News)

Fig.1 Emma Lazenby (2010). "One of a Kind" concept by Jancis Kinsman, directed by Emma Lazenby, produced by Aardman and ArthurCox, 6min.

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20102D animationAardman Studiosanimation • ArthurCox • Bristol • Bristol Haematology and Oncology Centre • cancer • cancer charities • cancer patients • cancer treatment • Charlie and Lola • childrencommunication tooldigital storytelling • Emma Lazenby • guide • guide for children • haematology • hospitalhospital treatment • Jancis Kinsman • naive illustrationNHS • oncology • One of a Kind (film) • paediatric radiography • personal narrativepublic health • radiography • radiotherapy • their storiestherapyUKvoicesyoung children

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 NOVEMBER 2012

What is the Liverpool Care Pathway?

"The Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP) is a scheme that is intended to improve the quality of care in the final hours or days of a patient's life, and to ensure a peaceful and comfortable death. It aims to guide doctors, nurses and other health workers looking after someone who is dying on issues such as the appropriate time to remove tubes providing food and fluid, or when to stop medication.

However, its use for some has become controversial, with relatives reportedly claiming it has been used without consent, and some saying it is used inappropriately.

This criticism and the media emphasis on the supposed controversy is puzzling, as the LCP has been standard practice in most hospitals for a number of years. The LCP has also received recognition on both a national and international level as an example of good practice.

As a GP put it in the British Medical Journal, the LCP 'has transformed end of life care from an undignified, painful experience into a peaceful, dignified death at home'"

(NHS Choices, UK)

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1990s • advanced illness • British Medical Journal • care • comfortable death • consent • controversydeath • death pathway • diedignitydyingemotional needsend of life • end of life care • end-of-life careeuthanasiagood practiceGPguide • health workers • healthcare • hospice • hospital • LCP (acronym) • life • Liverpool Care Pathway • Marie Curie Palliative Care Institute • media criticism • medication • multidisciplinary approach • National Health Service • NHS • palliative care • patientpatient care • peaceful • physical needs • plan of care • prolonging life • public health • quality of care • relieve suffering • Royal Liverpool University Hospital • social needs • spiritual needs • suffering • terminally ill • UK • undignified

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 AUGUST 2012

O Tamaiti: young boy who is expected to play guardian to his siblings

"Sima Urale's debut short film, beautifully realised in black and white, tells the story of a young Samoan boy who is expected to play guardian to his siblings. As his parents struggle in their new country, he is overwhelmed by the responsibility. When faced with his grief, the adults fail to recognise his pain. Poignant attention to details that convey a child's perspective (eg. the movement of a spacies game and shopping trolley are intercut) saw O Tamaiti win awards at film festivals around the globe, including the prestigious Silver Lion at Venice."

(NZ On Screen)

Fig. 1 Dir. Sima Urale, 15mins, NZ, 1996, black & white, 1.1:66

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1996Aotearoa New Zealandarcade gameattention to detailAustralasiababyblack and whitechildrenchilds perspectivechurch • Coke machine • coming of age • cot death • deathdebutfamily • female filmmaker • hospitalimmigrant • Kara Paewai • kiwi short films • new baby • New Zealand • New Zealand cinemaNew Zealand on Screen • O Tamaiti • PacificPacific IslanderPolynesianpregnancySamoan • sensitive portrayal • shopping trolley • short filmsiblings • Sima Urale • socialsoundSpace InvadersspaciesThe Coming of Age of The New Zealand Short Filmyoung boy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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