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Which clippings match 'Naughty' keyword pg.1 of 1
04 FEBRUARY 2016

Retailer uses drones to playfully respond to social media censorship

"clothing retail store BUYMA recently produced a creative commercial that strictly wants you to buy their clothes. Since Japanese TV programs are legally obligated to cover sensitive body parts, BUYMA uses drones to fully censor two professional belly [sic] dancers while they dance their routine naked."

[This Buyma ad which was created for television clearly plays with concepts around censorship - both in the context of Japanese broadcast media and perhaps more importantly in the context of social media where it will likely have most traction. In doing so the ad playfully references contemporary restrictions in place on sites such as Facebook.]

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2015ballet • Buyma (retailer) • censorshipcheekyclassical balletclothing retailercomedy of mannerscultural conventionsdancedroneetiquette • flying drone • high-technology • hoverJapan • Japanese online retailer • morality • naked ballet dancing • naughty • nude man • nude women • nudity • obscenity • obscuring nudity • online retailer • playful provocation • playfulnesspolite societyquadcoptersexual taboo • social media censorship • social shopping service • tabootv adtv advertveiledviral advisual gag

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 DECEMBER 2014

Profanity Pop by José Rodolfo Loaiza Ontiveros

"These wonderfully warped depictions of Disney classics is brought to you by artist José Rodolfo Loaiza Ontiveros. His upcoming exhibition, 'Profanity Pop,' is described as a 'celebration of creative freedom in our time' –– creative freedom apparently translating to Snow White taking sexy selfies. There's something surprisingly unnerving about watching your childhood BFFs making out, doing drugs and taking pregnancy tests, no matter how much you thought you'd moved on from your Disney roots."

(Priscilla Frank, 01 August 2014, The Huffington Post)

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2014adult imageryart exhibition • Best Friends Forever (BFF) • botox • Botulinum toxin • candid shotcelebrity culture • contemporary situations • critical reinterpretation • crotch shot • culture jammingexhibitionismfairy tale charactersfan artHuffington Posticonic charactersillustration • imagined scenarios • irreverence • Jose Rodolfo Loaiza Ontiveros • La Luz de Jesus Gallery • Mexican artistmodern situationsnaughtypaparazziparodypop artpopular culturePrince Charming • Profanity Pop (2014) • reimaginingsselfie • sexy selfies • shipping (fandom)Snow Whitespectacular society • tabloid photo • tabloidisation • taco shot • unwholesomenessvanityWalt Disney • warped depictions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 AUGUST 2013

Guitar Pee: cheeky marketing stunt uses interactive urinal guitar

"Guitar Pee is a urinal equipped with sensors that plays music when someone pees on it. The different strings play different electric sounds depending on the aim of the stream, and at the end of your session you can even send an 'MPee3' straight to your phone to share your moment. Clearly, this isn't a concept for the ladies but you can try to woo them with your song even if you don't have a clue how to play a real guitar (they don't have to know the source of your craft). After all, the Guitar Pee tagline is 'Music. We know it comes from everywhere.' We guess it's better to hear rock music when you pee than the generic trickling water sound."

(Natt Garun, 30 May 2012, Digital Trends)

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Almap BBDO • analogue correspondencebar • bathroom • BBDO • Billboard Magazine • Brazilcheekydesigning experiencesdouble entendreelectric guitarexperience designguitarguitar game • Guitar Pee • guitar solo • interactive advertisinginteractive music gamesinteractive toyintimate interaction • MPee3 • naughtyphallic symbol • phallus • playplayfulrock musicSan Paolosensorsoundmachinestoileturinal

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 MAY 2011

Monkey Magazine: a new publishing vernacular?

"In the future, as depicted in the 2002 film Minority Report, our periodicals will create interactive, hybrid reading/viewing experiences–with built–in sound and motion–based commercials rather than static advertisements, incorporating news footage with pages that dissolve and re–form to reflect breaking stories. Despite minute gestures in that direction, such as the Amazon Kindle and G24, The Guardian's PDF newspaper that's updated throughout the day, that vision of media–if there's really a market for it–is a long way off. ...

Nevertheless, something ... is now available weekly from Dennis Publishing, the company that gave the world The Week, Maxim and several other British 'lad magazines' as well as launched their American spin–offs. Monkey is proportioned like a glossy, has an interface that mimics the turning of pages and even has a magazine–like layout: margins, a basic two–column grid, images combined with text and print–like pacing. The difference is that Monkey's text sparkles (literally, if not figuratively), dances and slides onto the page. Many of the photos will turn into movies or slideshows (some rather naughty) when clicked, and on some spreads users can shuffle page elements, substituting one image for another. The format also changes to serve its content. A small mini–magazine with short reviews is digitally 'stitched' into the 'middle' of each issue. Additionally, most advertisements come alive, thanks either to Flash, streaming video or some combination, showing previews of movies or commercials for products framed by the equivalent of a full–page ad.

To be sure, Monkey does nothing that isn't done on other websites, and it has formal predecessors for its page interface–the arty This Is a Magazine, for one, and the webified versions of print glossies from Zinio for another. But unlike the wider web–which has evolved its own vocabulary and conventions for storytelling–and other web magazine predecessors–for which the turn–the–page interface seems a formal conceit–Monkey truly blends old and new media design conventions in a way that is both appalling and appealing."

(Jandos Rothstein, 29 January 2008)

Fig.1 Monkey Magazine, 2011. Dennis Publishing, Issue 183, pp.8,9.

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Adobe FlashAIGAAmazon Kindleanimated presentationcelebritycontent formconventions • Dennis Publishing • design aestheticsdesign conventionsdesign for the screendesign vocabulary • digitally stitched • e-zine • experience design • ezine • formal conceit • G24 • hybridhybrid experiencehybrid forms • lads mag • magazinemagazine layout • Maxim (magazine) • mens magazine • mini-magazine • Minority Report • Monkey Magazine • motion-based commercials • multimedianaughtynew medianews footagenewspaper • page interface • page metaphorpaginationpastiche • PDF newspaper • pin-upprediction • print glossies • print-like • publishingreading experience • screen dissolve • sexslide showstorytellingstreaming videoThe Guardian • The Week (magazine) • This Is a Magazine • triviaturn-the-page interfacevernacularviewing experiencevisual communicationvisual languagevisual vernacularweb designweb magazineweb vernacularwebified • webzine • Zinio (magazine)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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