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Which clippings match 'Apprenticeship' keyword pg.1 of 2
15 JULY 2014

Diagram for the structure of teaching at the Bauhaus / Schema zum Aufbau der Lehre am Bauhaus

"The individual elements of the Bauhaus teachings are inscribed in a circular shape. The areas of the preliminary course and building are conspicuously delineated from the core of the instruction–the workshops with their accompanying subjects–by a drawn double ring. This is due to the special position that both of these teaching areas occupied: In order to even be accepted to the study programme at the Bauhaus, it was necessary to successfully complete the preliminary course. And only the most talented students could qualify for participation in the building theory course. The schema also indicates the length of the respective educational units."

Fig.1 Walter Gropius, Schema zum Aufbau der Lehre am Bauhaus, 1922, veröffentlicht in: Staatliches Bauhaus Weimar, 1919–1923 Bauhaus–Archiv / Museum für Gestaltung, Berlin.

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TAGS

1922apprenticeshipart and design educationatelier methodBauhaus DessauBauhaus SchoolBauhaus WeimarBauhaus-KolloquiumBerlin • circular disk • colour theorycourse modulescraft and designcurricula designcurriculumcurriculum designdesign and makingdesign curriculumdesign educationdesign formalismdesign school • design workshops • hierarchical model • learning and teachinglearning through practicematerial experimentationmaterial interventionsmaterial practice • Museum fur Gestaltung • programme modulesschema • Schema zum Aufbau der Lehre am Bauhaus • Staatliches Bauhaus • studio approachstudio coursestudio practice • study programme • Walter Gropiusworkshops

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 DECEMBER 2013

Interaction Design Education Summit 2014

Wednesday, 5 February 2014, Utrecht School of the Arts (HKU) at Hilversum (http://interaction14.ixda.org/venues/).

"At a moment in time where everybody and everything is constantly interacting – through the use of networks, apps, products, media and services – educating students to design these interactions is not only needed, but also a fundamental challenge. Rapid developments in society and technology put increasingly high demands on the knowledge and skills of future interaction designers. Challenging traditional institutions, some companies have started programs for in–house training. At the same time, alternative educational platforms – such as edX, Udacity and Interaction–Design.org – are offering open access to high–level learning materials.

To successfully address these developments, interaction design education might need to reinvent itself."

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TAGS

2014alternative educational models • alternative educational platforms • Amsterdamapprenticeship • Daniel Rosenberg • Delftdesign educationdesign professionalsdesign schoolse-learning • educating students • education summit • edX • Fred Beecher • Gillian Crampton Smith • Hilversum • HKU Games and Interaction • HKU Hilversum • in-house training • interaction designInteraction Design Association (IxDA)interaction design educationInteraction Design Foundationinteraction designers • Interaction14 • interactions • interactive dialogue • IxDA • Jared Spool • knowledge and skillslearning materials • media and services • new forms of apprenticeship • online coursesonline education servicesonline learningonline portfolioonline presenceopen accessopen online coursesprofessional developmentrapid changethe future • traditional institutions • TU Delft Design for Interaction • UdacityUtrechtUtrecht School of the Arts

CONTRIBUTOR

Neal White
31 DECEMBER 2012

Privileging the collective: the tradition of the atelier method in art and design education

"Art and design education has broadly settled on two categories of pedagogical frameworks, both evolutions from historical precedents. The first of these categories is driven by the spirit of the 'design collective', and comprises the art school studio or atelier model. This was established by the private Florentine art schools of the renaissance from around the 15th Century (King, 2003), always with a focus on making as well as learning from the group – from both peers and Masters. Later, this model of learning through practice carried over to the art schools of England: in his 1858 inaugural address for the Cambridge School of Art, John Ruskin (Ruskin, 1858) spoke about the relative futility of formal teaching per se and instead the pressing need for students to learn by repeated and applied making. For applied craft and design, this studio approach was the method under the influential Bauhaus School (1919–1933) in Germany (Droste, 2005). The second category derives from the teaching of industrial arts and is typically driven by the far greater student volume processing needs of the institution. This category comprises the 'hot desking' or increasingly the 'no–desking' model, with large taught classes in lecture format, and occasional group tutorials. Such a model is often the norm for universities' academic courses. The model spread to the creative courses that were more typically offered by polytechnics in the UK. The first polytechnic dates back to the early nineteenth century (Fox, 1832–1854), although most were established in the 1960's with a remit of applied education in industry and science for work. In many countries, the term 'technical college' is the same as a polytechnic – in both the UK and Australia, many of these colleges converted into universities in the last 30 years."

(Ashley Hall and Tom Barker, 2010)

Hall, A. and T. Barker (2010). "Design collectives in education: evaluating the atelier format and the use of teaching narrative for collective cultural and creative learning, and the subsequent impact on professional practice". In Alternative Practices in Design: Past Present and Future. H. Edquist and L. Vaughan. Melbourne, Victoria, RMIT University: Design Research Institute.

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TAGS

2010academic coursesapplied craft and designapprenticeshipart and design educationart schools • artists studio • atelier methodatelier modelbaseroomBauhaus School • Cambridge School of Art • craft and designcraft skills • creative courses • creativity skillsdesign and makingdesign collectivedesign educationdesign studio educationdistance learningEuropean RenaissanceFlorence • Florentine art schools • formal teaching • group tutorials • Guild system • hot desking • industrial artsindustrial design • industrial practices • John Makepeace • John Ruskinlearning model • learning through making • learning through practicelecture formatlecturers • no-desking • Oxfordshire • Parnham • pedagogical modelpolytechnicremote learning • Rycote Wood • self-learning • studiostudio approachstudio practice • taught classes • technical collegetutorialsUKvocational trainingWilliam Morris • working environment • workspace

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 FEBRUARY 2012

John Sturges: Gunfight at the O. K. Corral

"John Sturges is a rather curious case in Hollywood history: a director responsible for a trio of extremely famous films, films whose titles have all but entered the language (Gunfight at the OK Corral, The Magnificent Seven and The Great Escape) but with whose own name only specialists are conversant."

(The Independent, 24 August 1992)

Fig.1 Intro to "Gunfight at the O. K. Corral" by John Sturges starring Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas. Soundtrack "Gunfight at the O.K. Corral", lyrics by Ned Washington, music by Dimitri Tiomkin, performed by Frankie Laine: Ok corral ok corral; there the outlaw band make their final stand; ok corral; oh my dearest one must die; lay down my gun or take the chance of losing you forever; duty calls; my backs against the wall; have you no kind word to say; before i ride away; away; Your love your love; i need; your love; Keep the flame let it burn; until i return; from the gunfight at ok corral; if the lord is my friend; we'll meet at the end; Of the gunfight at ok corral; gunfight at ok corral; Boot hill Boot hill; so cold so still; There they lay side by side; the killers that died; in the gunfight at ok corral; ok corral; gunfight at ok corral.

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TAGS

1910 • 19571992anonymityapprenticeship • Boot Hill • Burt Lancaster • classic western • corral • Dimitri Tiomkin • feature filmfilmfilm directorfilm studiesfilms • Frankie Laine • good company man • gunfight • Gunfight at the OK Corral • gunfighterHollywood • honour • honourable • John Sturges • Kirk Douglas • Leonard Maltin • masculinity • movie director • Ned Washington • obituarypassed away • prolific career • recognition • RKO • salarymanscreenplayscript • studio man • studio system • The Great Escape • The Magnificent Sevenwestern film genre

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 OCTOBER 2008

Moodle and Social Constructionism: Looking for the Individual in the Community

"[John Seely] Brown also suggests that we should re–conceive how we learn a profession. In Brown’s view, it is less “learning about” a body of knowledge and much more a process of “learning to be” a doctor or a lawyer or whatever else a student is trying to become. Learning conceived in this way becomes an activity which is facilitated by means other than didactic lecture. Brown’s views resonate with those who suggest that we put away the “sage on the stage” and embrace “the guide on the side.” But given that Brown’s keynote takes place on a stage, in reality he’s envisioning something a bit more nuanced, embodied in the idea of learning through apprenticeship. In language that resonates very strongly with constructionism, Brown suggests that we learn especially well not only when we do it in collaboration with others (as apprentices do), but when we think of learning as an opportunity to produce and share knowledge rather than to merely consume."

(Luke Fernandez)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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