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Which clippings match 'Academic Scholarship' keyword pg.1 of 1
13 OCTOBER 2017

What is discourse analysis? by Dr Stephanie Taylor

Stephanie Taylor, NCRMUK, Published on 27 Mar 2015

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TAGS

2015academic researchacademic scholarship • AQMeN Centre • Cathie Marsh Centre • content analysisdata analysisdiscourse analysis • discursive resource • Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) • interpretive repertoire • methodological approaches • methodological research • National Centre for Research Methods (NCRM)NCRM • NCRMUK • research methodssocial phenomenasocial phenomenon • social product • social sciencesocial science research • social science research methods • Stephanie Taylor • talktext dataUniversity of EdinburghUniversity of ManchesterUniversity of Southamptonutterances

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 JANUARY 2013

Journal of Digital Humanities

"The Journal of Digital Humanities (ISSN 2165–6673) is a comprehensive, peer–reviewed, open access journal that features the best scholarship, tools, and conversations produced by the digital humanities community in the previous quarter.

The Journal of Digital Humanities offers expanded coverage of the digital humanities in three ways. First, by publishing scholarly work beyond the traditional research article. Second, by selecting content from open and public discussions in the field. Third, by encouraging continued discussion through peer–to–peer review.

The Journal of Digital Humanities selects content from the Editors' Choice pieces from Digital Humanities Now, which highlights the best scholarship–in whatever form–that drives the field of digital humanities field forward. The Journal of Digital Humanities provides three additional layers of evaluation, review, and editing to the pieces initially identified by Digital Humanities Now.

The Journal of Digital Humanities and Digital Humanities Now are produced by the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media.

Editors: Daniel J. Cohen, Joan Fragaszy Troyano. Associate Editors: Sasha Hoffman, Jeri Wieringa.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 JANUARY 2013

Digital Humanities Now

"Digital Humanities Now showcases the scholarship and news of interest to the digital humanities community through a process of aggregation, discovery, curation, and review. Digital Humanities Now also is an experiment in ways to identify, evaluate, and distribute scholarship on the open web through a weekly publication and the quarterly Journal of Digital Humanities."

Editorial Board: Dan Cohen, Editor–in–Chief; Joan Fragaszy Troyano, Managing Editor; Sasha Hoffman, Editor; Jeri Wieringa, Editor.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 MAY 2011

Universities provide access to communities of scholars and testimony for a student's experience among these communities

"Central to higher education is the way universities provide access to communities of scholars and testimony for a student's experience among these communities. Consequently, universities should explore resources for bringing people together, not, as some interpretations of 'distance education' suggest, for reinforcing their isolation."

(John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid, 1995, p.4)

1). Brown, J. S. and P. Duguid (1996). The University in the Digital Age. Times Higher Education Supplement (THES). London: 1–4.

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 MAY 2011

Inconsistent design curricula and inexperienced guidance counsellors

"The vicissitudes of the market rarely dictate how many students will enroll in any given year because students' rationale for choosing a design major is not entirely pragmatic. They go to art and design schools to follow a 'creative' path, even though it may be a vague one. They could be 'natural–born artists' encouraged by family and friends to follow their muse, or they might be academically poor 'underachievers' for whom liberal arts holds little promise. Those enrolled in state or private universities or colleges majoring in graphic design may do so by default. Some enroll in fine arts programs because they love to paint, but they compromise (sometimes at the insistence of their parents) by entering communication arts programs. They may even concentrate on painting or printmaking as a minor, but graphic design is their degree goal because employment is necessary.

Despite increased visibility and recognition in the press, however, most students actually know very little about graphic design other than it pays better than fine art. A New York City high school guidance counselor consulted for this article admitted that she routinely sends her art students to art schools for 'general art' rather than focused design because she does not understand the distinction. 'I believe the student will figure out their major once in a program,' she says. But inconsistent design curricula adds to confusion, and when counselors and students are not familiar with the field itself, they cannot make informed decisions about which schools to attend, some of which are much more professionally oriented than others. Some entry requirements will only favor students who exhibit quantifiable potential, though considerably more have rather lenient enrollment policies, presuming that if a student can make a competent photograph or an imaginative collage, they can also be a graphic designer."

(Steven Heller, 08 September 2005)

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TAGS

academic scholarshipadmissions criteriaAIGAart and design schoolsart schoolsart studentscompromise • confusion • creative career • curriculum definition • design curriculadesign disciplineemployment • enrolment policies • entry requirements • fine art • general art • graphic designgraphic designer • guidance counsellors • high schoolinconsistencyliberal artsmarket forces • muse • NASAD • National Association of Schools of Art and Design • obfuscatepaintingpragmatismprintmaking • professional orientation • Steven Heller • student enrolment • university enrolmentvisibility and recognitionvisual communication

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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