Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Project Work' keyword pg.1 of 1
29 OCTOBER 2013

Using a Recording Template as part of a Reflective Practice Model

"An RT [Recording Template] is required to collate this evidence forming a framework from which we will annotate the project's life cycle. This reflection will bring about a direct interface with the learning contract (LC) objectives and help shape and control the project as it occurs. Alongside the RT, a daily journal will also be kept and all the notes of communication from peers logged and referred back to. This triangulation of data, will allow me to gain a sense of perspective towards my research. The different evidence will qualify a more balanced view of events."

(James Kelway, 31 March 2005)

1

TAGS

action researchannotationsBob DickCal Swann • daily journal • data triangulation • Donald Schon • evidence forming • evidence gatheringhigher education • James Kelway • James McKernan • Jean McNiff • Josey-Bass • Kogen Page • learning contract • lifecycle model • Ortrunn Zuber-Skeritt • practice of design • professional developmentproject method • project reflection • project work • recording template • reflective journalreflective practitionerresearch method • Rizal Sebastian • triangulation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MARCH 2013

Prototyping in Public Services

"Prototyping in Public Services describes an approach that can be used to help develop new and innovative services by testing ideas out early in the development cycle.

NESTA has produced a guide for policymakers, strategy leads, heads of service, commissioners and anyone else in a public service looking for new methodologies that can help them to better meet the needs of their communities. It sits alongside the Prototyping Framework: A guide to prototyping new ideas which provides examples of activities that can happen at different stages of a prototyping project.

The guide and toolkit are early outputs from our prototyping work and are based on work NESTA and its partners have been doing with several local authorities and third sector organisations. We will continue to learn about prototyping as an approach that can be used to develop public services, through our practical programmes."

(NESTA, UK)

1

TAGS

commissioners • concept developmentconceptualisation • development cycle • guide • heads of service • local authorities • NESTA • new and innovative services • new ideas • new methodologies • policy makers • practical programmes • project developmentproject workprototyping • Prototyping in Public Services • prototyping project • public services • strategy leads • testing • testing ideas • third sector • third sector organisations • toolkitUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 NOVEMBER 2012

Using Individual Weighting Factor to fairly recognise and compensate individual contributions to group work

"The modified pool of marks technique will not, however, overcome a fundamental weakness of the procedure, namely that the students have to allocate a fixed pool of marks or points. This can be difficult to do using whole numbers. For example, if eight marks are to be allocated between four people and one is given four of them it is not possible to give all the rest the same mark. An alternative technique is to allow the students to allocate marks freely and then calculate an individual weighting factor based on the ratio between the individual score and the average score for all members of the group. This has the advantage of avoiding putting students in the situation where for every additional mark they give to one individual they have to take a mark off another individual. Indeed this is confirmed where a scale of marks is used and students are unconstrained in the marks that they can allocate. In this situation they show a reluctance to make much use of the lower end of the scale and consequently the mean score is well above the middle (average) point of the scale (Conway et al, 1993). Next year, in addition to using the modified pool of marks technique, a variant on the technique used by Conway et al (1993) will also be employed (Appendix 3). This technique awards the group mark to a student who makes an average contribution. Those who make greater (or lesser) contributions receive more (or less) than the original group mark. The method of calculation is described in Appendix 4."

(Mick Healey, 1993, p.4)

Mick Healey "Developing Student Capability Using Peer and Self Assessment: A Preliminary Evaluation of The Distribution of a Pool of Marks Technique for Assessing The Contribution of Individuals to a Group Project", Using Assessment to Develop Capability conference, 1993.

TAGS

1993accountabilityassessment criteriaassessment for learningassessment techniques • Atara Sivan • contribution to the group • David Kember • fairnessgrading schemegroup work • Higher Education for Capability (HEC) • individual accountability • individual contribution • Individual Weighting Factor • learning and teaching • May Wu • measurementmeasuring individual performancemeasuring instrument • Mick Healey • modified pool of marks technique • peer assessment • peer evaluationpeer learningproject work • Robert Conway • student performance

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 JUNE 2012

SEQ Legal: website law

"Web developers and webmasters need to ensure that their sites comply with the varied and ever–changing requirements of English law. Although it is relatively simple to create and publish a website, the legal consequences of those simple acts can be complex – and potentially expensive. A myriad of different UK and EU laws intrude upon website design, domain name choice, website content, sales from websites, and indeed every other aspect of ecommerce and online activity."

(SEQ Legal LLP.)

1

TAGS

binding agreementcontractdesign businessdesign contract • domain name choice • e-commerce • ecommerce • English law • EU • EU law • intellectual propertylaw • legal consequences • legal services • online activity • professional practiceproject workrequirementssales • SEQ Legal • terms and conditionsUK • UK law • Web developers • webmasters • website • website content • website design • website law • websites

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 MAY 2011

AIGA Standard Form of Agreement for Design Services

"This agreement allows you to create customized terms and conditions for different types of design engagements. Updated in 2009, it is modular to meet the needs of a growing design community involved in various disciplines.

It does not take a one–size–fits–all approach, and it is not an extensive pre–printed document where you simply fill in the blanks. Instead, this agreement acknowledges that most design firms develop their own custom proposal document for each project and are looking for an appropriate set of terms and conditions to attach to it. When put together and signed, the custom proposal document and its attached terms and conditions comprise the binding agreement with the client. With this in mind, the focus of the AIGA Standard Form of Agreement is on those terms and conditions.

In addition to being more customizable, the modularity also helps to keep individual agreements down to a more manageable size. The first two modules, Basic Terms & Conditions and Intellectual Property Provisions, should be used for all design assignments. An additional three modules are provided as supplements that can be added to the agreement as needed: Print–specific Terms & Conditions, Interactive–specific Terms & Conditions and Environmental–specific Terms & Conditions."

(American Institute of Graphic Arts)

2). AIGA Standard Form of Agreement for Design Services

1

TAGS

2009agreementAIGA • AIGA Standard Form of Agreement • American Institute of Graphic Artsbinding agreementbusiness project • client project • contractcustomisable • design assignments • design businessdesign contractdesign firmsdesign professiondesign projectintellectual propertyinteractive designmodularityprint design • professional association • professional association for designprofessional body • project proposal • project workterms and conditions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.