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Which clippings match 'American Institute Of Graphic Arts' keyword pg.1 of 1
28 JULY 2013

Will Burtin: pioneer information designer

"Will Burtin, was one of the foremost information designers of the 20th century. Will Burtin was born in Germany and trained as a typographer and designer at the Werkschule Cologne, Germany, where he also later taught. Shortly after emigrating to the United States in 1938, he was commissioned to create exhibition units for the Federal Pavilion at the 1939 New York World's Fair. From 1943 to 1945, Burtin worked for the U.S. Army Air Corps. In 1945, Burtin became art director for Fortune magazine. Later, in 1949, Burtin established his own design firm in New York with clients including Union Carbide, Eastman Kodak, the Smithsonian Institution, and Upjohn Pharmaceuticals. In 1971, Burtin received a Gold Medal from the American Institute of Graphic Arts."

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TAGS

20th centuryAmerican Institute of Graphic ArtsColognecommunication design • communication designer • design firm • Eastman Kodak • Federal Pavilion at the • Fortune magazinegraphic designgraphic designerinfluential designerinformation designinformation designerinformation graphics • Kolner Werkschulen • layered • New York Worlds Fair 1939 • Print (magazine) • RIT Graphic Design ArchiveRochester Institute of Technology • Scope (magazine) • Smithsonian Institutetypographer • Union Carbide • Upjohn Pharmaceuticals • US Army Air Corps • visual communicationWill Burtin

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JUNE 2013

The AIGA Design Archives

"AIGA Design Archives is one of the richest online resources available to those who practice, study and appreciate great design. It represents the quality of work being created, as well as shifting aesthetics and sensibilities of the designers of the day. Included in this resource are more than 20,000 selections from AIGA's annual juried design competitions dating from 1924 through the present. In addition, it features special collections of major American design firms and practitioners whose design accomplishments might otherwise not be preserved online or made available to the public. These now include the work of Chermayeff & Geismar (1960–2006), Vignelli Associates (1962–2008), and Push Pin Graphic (1960–2005).

The collection is expected to grow by approximately 300 selections a year. A number of the physical artifacts in the collections are available for research and study at the AIGA Archives at the Denver Art Museum in Colorado and the Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Columbia University's Butler Library in New York."

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TAGS

1924AIGA • AIGA Design Archives • American design • American Institute of Graphic Arts • Butler Library • Columbia University • Denver Art Museum • design archive • design collectiondesign firmsgraphic artsgraphic design collection • Ivan Chermayeff • juried design competitionmodern graphic design collectionphysical artefacts • Push Pin Graphic • Rare Book and Manuscript Library • Sagi Haviv • shifting aesthetics • shifting sensibilities • special collections • Tom Geismar • twentieth-century design • Vignelli Associates • visual communication

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 MAY 2011

AIGA Standard Form of Agreement for Design Services

"This agreement allows you to create customized terms and conditions for different types of design engagements. Updated in 2009, it is modular to meet the needs of a growing design community involved in various disciplines.

It does not take a one–size–fits–all approach, and it is not an extensive pre–printed document where you simply fill in the blanks. Instead, this agreement acknowledges that most design firms develop their own custom proposal document for each project and are looking for an appropriate set of terms and conditions to attach to it. When put together and signed, the custom proposal document and its attached terms and conditions comprise the binding agreement with the client. With this in mind, the focus of the AIGA Standard Form of Agreement is on those terms and conditions.

In addition to being more customizable, the modularity also helps to keep individual agreements down to a more manageable size. The first two modules, Basic Terms & Conditions and Intellectual Property Provisions, should be used for all design assignments. An additional three modules are provided as supplements that can be added to the agreement as needed: Print–specific Terms & Conditions, Interactive–specific Terms & Conditions and Environmental–specific Terms & Conditions."

(American Institute of Graphic Arts)

2). AIGA Standard Form of Agreement for Design Services

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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