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Which clippings match 'Professional Practice' keyword pg.1 of 4
12 JULY 2015

Longitudinal and ipsative assessment

"Ipsative assessment and feedback (assessment and feedback based on comparison with previous performance) describes an approach to assessment that focuses on improvement against past performance rather than grading against set criteria. Commonly used in performance-related disciplines such as music or sport, ipsative assessment enables credit to be given for improvement regardless of achievement (Hughes, Okumoto and Crawford, 2010). Ipsative feedback in turn makes comments on how far the student has travelled from a previous level of performance, which is both more motivational for non-traditional learners and more likely to promote self-regulation in all students.

In a wide range of assessment scenarios, from professional practice (medicine for example) to distance learning, ipsative assessment and feedback could reduce the need for testing and retesting of skills. Instead of 'learning for the test', a process of continuous monitoring and self-regulation could make the acquisition of professional or vocational competences more authentic, rewarding and genuine, and enable tutors to devote more time and effort to mentoring."

(Marianne Sheppard and Ros Smith, http://jiscdesignstudio.pbworks.com)

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TAGS

assessment for learning • assessment scenarios • assessment techniquescomparison with previous performancecontinuous monitoring • continuous personal development • diagnostic assessment • Gwyneth Hugheshow far the student has travelledimprovement against past performanceipsative assessment • ipsative assessment and feedback • ipsative feedback • JISC Design Studio • Kaori Okumoto • knowledge and skills acquisition • learning and successlearning engagement • learning for the test • level of performance • Likert scale • longitudinal learning datamaking processmeasuring individual performancemeasuring instrument • Megan Crawford • motivational needs • non-traditional learners • performance-related disciplines • personal achievementpersonal bestpersonal improvement • professional competences • professional practicequality of achievementrunning score • self-regulation • student achievementstudent performance • vocational competences

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 NOVEMBER 2013

Co-Lab: Practice and Theory Research Lab

"The Co–Lab has been established to provide essential support for research staff engaged in creative media practice from within the Media School, National Centre for Computer Animation and School of Design, Engineering and Computing at Bournemouth University.

Sharing knowledge across disciplines, our aim is to create a space in which resources, ideas and new areas of research can be opened up and supported."

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TAGS

applied researchBournemouth UniversityBournemouth University Media School • Co-Lab • collaborative researchcreative media • creative media practice • creative practice research • Experimental Media Research Group (EMRG) • interdisciplinary media research • interdisciplinary research • Master of Philosophy • media researchMPhil • National Centre for Computer Animation (UK) • Neal WhitePhDpractice as researchpractice driven research in art and media • practice driven research-based teaching • professional practiceresearch centreresearch groupresearch labresearch staff • School of Design Engineering and Computing (BU) • Stephen BellUK • Visual Research Group (BU)

CONTRIBUTOR

Neal White
29 JUNE 2013

PATHWAYS AND GATEWAYS: the structure and regulation of UK architectural education

"Architectural education has proved to be a valuable part of UK higher education in the last fifty years and it has developed a strong international reputation for excellence in both teaching and research. The recent changes to higher education funding and the changing nature of professional practice have contributed to an evolving environment for UK architectural education where flexibility and innovation are increasingly important factors for continuing success. Revisions to the European Union requirements for architectural education are also contributing to this changing and uncertain environment. It has become clear to many of those most closely involved in UK architectural education that if the sector is to continue to develop and flourish some change in its regulatory framework is required in order that adequate responses can evolve and be encouraged.

The title of the report refers to the principal elements of the regulatory framework. The term 'pathway' is used to describe the route taken to registration and the term 'gateway' is used to describe thresholds through which candidates must pass in order to gain entry into the profession. This preliminary report seeks to summarise the context in which UK architectural education operates and to suggest proposals for reform which can hopefully gather support across the full spectrum of stakeholders. The intention of the Review Group is to publish a final report by October 2013."

(The UK Architectural Education Review Group, April 2013)

TAGS

2013architectural educationarchitectural pedagogyarchitectural practicearchitecture designarchitecture schools • career pathway • changing environmentchanging needschanging timescreative industriesdesign careerdesign industrydesign professionalsEuropean Unionflexibility and innovationhigher education • higher education funding • international reputation • professionprofessional certificationprofessional practiceprofessionalisationregulatory frameworkreport • SCHOSA • Standing Conference of Heads of Schools of Architecture • teaching and researchtuition feesUK • UK Architectural Education Review Group • uncertain environment • vertical discourses

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 MARCH 2013

Creativity is key to successful completion of design researcher PhDs

"DESIGNERS ENJOY DESIGNING
The practicalities of the design–based Ph.D (or Ph.D's generally in the creative arts) often fails to recognise the wider needs of the researcher who would typically have bachelors and masters degrees in their field and where the structure of their degree programme(s) would have been practice–based i.e. they have considerable prior history of creative practice; they enjoy creative practice; and they may well miss the fulfilment of creative practice if none was undertaken during a three to five year full time Ph.D.

STUDENTS NEED TUTORS THAT CAN DESIGN
Practice–based learning at undergraduate and masters level requires a significant taught input by competent practitioners. It is all too common for academics to loose or fail to develop capability in practice as they move through an academic career that is based on teaching and research. The typical route by which full–time academics with a practitioner background acquire a Ph.D is through part–time study. In order to maintain competence as a practitioner for the benefit of students, there is a case to encourage the use of practice in staff Ph.D's.

RESEARCH OUTCOMES NEED DESIGNING
An unexpected outcome from the author's experience of Ph.D supervision in creative disciplines has been the scenario where professional practice was necessary for the progress of the research. 'Tools' are a popular and relevant outcome from design–based Ph.D's and situations arise where the tool itself must be designed in order to facilitate its validation. It is therefore necessary to consider the use of researcher–practice where practice is not a direct means of the data collection but a process by which research outcomes can progress to validation."

(Mark Evans, p.75, 2009)

Evans, M. (2009). "Creative professional practice in methods and methodology: case study examples from Ph.D's in industrial design". EKSIG 2009: Experiential Knowledge, Method & Methodology, Experiential Knowledge Special Interest Group.

TAGS

2009 • academic career • capability in practice • competence as a practitioner • competent practitioners • creative arts • creative disciplines • creative motivationcreative practicecreativitydata collection techniquesdesign researcher • design-based PhD • design-based researchdesignersEKSIG • engaging in practice • industrial design • interviewing practitioners • Mark Evans • motivation • needs of the researcher • PhD studentsPhD supervision • practice for data collection • practitioner background • professional practice • research outcomes • researcher-practice • successful completion • teaching and research • tutors that can design • underlying motivation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 MARCH 2013

Constructing Models for Practitioner-Based Research

"This paper considers differing understandings about the role and praxis of practitioner–based research for the arts. Over more than a decade the nexus between theory and practice has been a point of debate within the contemporary arts school both in Australia and overseas. This paper attempts to reveal ways of approaching this issue from within and across the disciplines. Discussions with colleagues from the arts representing fields as diverse as music, visual arts, creative writing, women's studies, dance and theatre studies indicate that the research principles explored, albeit briefly, here have resonance for each of these disciplines. Consequently, in an attempt to be broadly relevant for these diverse fields I have chosen to position the model as practitioner–based. Within this widened context I will be exploring the different ways in which studio–based practitioners and academics conceptualise the processes and characteristics of research in the arts and professional practice. However, as this is still work in progress, my exemplars will largely reflect my own field of the visual arts. Further research will enable this model to expand.

Presented is a way to conceptualise and explain what we do as studio–based researchers in the arts. In so doing I am recognising that contemporary practices in the arts reflect a meridian era of evolution, which requires us to be articulate practitioners. This includes being able to analyse and write about our practice in sophisticated ways. I see practitioner–based research and the resultant exploration of personal praxis as a way to achieve this. What I propose is that as artists we open up a larger domain by recontextualizing and reinterpreting aspects of standard mainstream research processes, looking at the resemblances, the self–resemblances and the differences between traditional and practitioner–based research methods as a logic of necessity."

(Robyn Stewart, 2001)

TEXT Vol Vol 5 No 2 October 2001 [http://www.griffith.edu.au/school/art/text/]

TAGS

2001academics • articulate practitioners • artists • arts fields • arts researchcontemporary artscontemporary practicescreative artscreative practicecreative writingdanceinvestigative praxis • logic of necessity • music practice • personal praxispractitioner-based research • practitioner-based research methods • praxisprofessional practicerecontextualisationresearch in the arts • research principles • research processesRobyn Stewartstudio practicestudio-based enquiry • studio-based practitioners • studio-based researcher • TEXT (journal) • theatre studies • theory and practicevisual artswomens studies

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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