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24 JANUARY 2015

Bud Caddell: Complexity and the Future of Advertising

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TAGS

2011advertisingadvertising strategyAustronesian cultures • brand partnerships • brand refresh • bucket brigade • Bud Caddell • building resilience • business modelcollaborationcomplex systemscomplexityconvergent thinkingcreative ideascreativity • design for creativity • digital agencydivergent thinkingeducation systemhaving original ideas that have valueKen Robinsonmarketing strategy • Mawken people • Moken people • Morgan people • nomadic people • non-conformity • predicting the futureproblem-solvingproduct innovation • rapid response • rethinking strategies • sea people • sea-based culture • self-organising teamsthinking skills • tomorrows challenges • tsunami

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 MARCH 2014

An extensive online resource for creating new ideas

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absence thinking • action verbs • areas of key value • art streaming • assumption busting • attribute listing • braindrawing • brainmapping • brainstorming • brainwriting • breakdown • challenge • chunking • conflict • Crawford slip method • create new ideas • creative ideas • creative method • creative methods • creative skills • creative stimulus • creative techniques • creative tension • creative thinkingcreative toolscreativity • creativity toolbox • creativity tools • David Straker • day in the life • decomposition • deep analysis • delphi methoddoodlingdrawing • essential qualities • expand thinking • explore ideas • extended ideas • focused thinking • forced conflict • forcing combinations • gain consensus • gradually unfolding • group doodlin • guided imagery • hierarchical breakdown and exploration • how to • how-how diagram • idea generationimagineering • incomplete doodles • incubation • lateral thinking • looking at the problem backwards • lotus blossom • mind-mapping • minimal personal interaction • modelling • morphological analysis • nominal group technique • non-verbal stimulation • online resourcepausepost-it notes • post-up • problem plus stimulus equals idea • provocation • random word • random words • real problem • remembering solutions • remembrance • reversal • reverse brainstorming • rightbraining • role-play • rubber-ducking • scamper • Six Thinking Hats • stimulate the subconscious • stimuli • storyboarding • subconscious • take a break • talk and talk • talk streaming • the Kipling method • think more deeply • thinking sideways • toolbox • triz contradiction analysis • unblock • unconscious assumptions • unfold the flower • unfolding • value engineering • visioning • visual story • wishing • write and write • write streaming

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 FEBRUARY 2014

Advice on preparing your art and design creative portfolio

"A portfolio is a collection of your work, which shows how your skills and ideas have developed over a period of time. It demonstrates your creativity, personality, abilities and commitment, and helps us to evaluate your potential."

(University of the Arts London, 2013)

Videos include: What is a portfolio; Preparing a digital Portfolio; Preparing a portfolio; Why is a portfolio important; What should be in a portfolio; Applying to MA; Applying to BA; Applying to foundation.

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2013 • A3 • A4 • applying for art and design study • applying for BA study • art and design portfolio • art portfolio • artists journal • collection of work • colour studies • creative abilities • creative ideascreative journey • creative portfolio • creative practicecreative problem solvingcreative process journalcreativity research • design degree • design development • design inspirations • design portfoliodesign practitionerdesign workbookdocumenting design processdrawing studies • examples of research • how to make a strong portfolio • idea generationmaterials investigation • personal commitment • portfolio • portfolio assessment • portfolio of artwork • portfolio requirements • portfolio review • postgraduate portfolios • practice-based art and design course • preparing a portfolio • preparing your portfolio • reference materials • series of projects • showreelsketchblogsketchbook • sketchbook plan • sketching ideas • skills and ideas • student interview • studio diary • studying designUK • unfinished work • university applications processUniversity of the Arts London (UAL)visual diary • what is a portfolio • workbook

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 SEPTEMBER 2012

UK Artist Opportunities through Jerwood Makers Open 2013

"Jerwood Makers Open is designed to commission and showcase new work by emerging artists working in the applied arts. Five commissions of £7,500 will be awarded to artists to create new work, to be exhibited as part of the JVA programme at Jerwood Space, London and on tour nationally. Artists will be chosen by an independent selection panel and must be UK resident and within 10 years of graduating or setting up their practice.

BACKGROUND: Launched in 2010, Jerwood Makers Open has been developed to create a space in which to recognise and celebrate the significance of making practice and process within the contemporary visual arts. This initiative offers makers at the early stages of their careers an opportunity to develop their creative ideas independently of specific commissioning structures by submitting a proposal for new work. It totals an investment of £37,500 in new applied arts commissions.

Jerwood Visual Arts, developed and managed by the Jerwood Charitable Foundation, is committed to supporting and showcasing contemporary applied arts practice. The Jerwood Applied Arts Prize ran for 11 years (1999–2007) in partnership with the Crafts Council. This was followed from 2008 to 2010 by Jerwood Contemporary Makers, a nominated exhibition series which provided a platform to show new and emergent work in the field of making."

(Jerwood Visual Arts, UK)

Fig.1 Glithero, Burn Burn Burn (after) [http://www.glithero.com/contact–us].

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2013 • applied art • applied arts • artist opportunities • artists • arts prize • burningcommissioncommissioning • contemporary applied arts • contemporary applied practice • contemporary visual artscreative ideasearly career • emergent work • emerging artistsJerwood Charitable Foundation • Jerwood Contemporary Makers • Jerwood Makers Open • Jerwood Space • Jerwood Visual Arts • JVA • Londonmakers • making practice • new work • UK • UK Crafts Council • visual arts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 MAY 2011

Dave Meslin: the antidote to apathy

"How often do we hear that people just don't care? How many times have you been told that real, substantial change isn't possible because most people are too selfish, too stupid or too lazy to try to make a difference in their community? I propose to you today that apathy as we think we know it doesn't actually exist, but rather, that people do care, but that we live in a world that actively discourages engagement by constantly putting obstacles and barriers in our way.

And I'll give you some examples of what I mean. Let's start with city hall. You ever see one of these before? This is a newspaper ad. It's a notice of a zoning application change for a new office building so the neighborhood knows what's happening. As you can see, it's impossible to read. You need to get halfway down to even find out which address they're talking about, and then farther down, in tiny 10–point font to find out how to actually get involved. Imagine if the private sector advertised in the same way –– if Nike wanted to sell a pair of shoes and put an ad in the paper like that. (Applause) Now that would never happen. You'll never see an ad like that, because Nike actually wants you to buy their shoes. Whereas the city of Toronto clearly doesn't want you involved with the planning process, otherwise their ads would look something like this –– with all the information basically laid out clearly. As long as the city's putting out notices like this to try to get people engaged, then, of course, people aren't going to be engaged. But that's not apathy; that's intentional exclusion.

Public space. (Applause) The manner in which we mistreat our public spaces is a huge obstacle towards any type of progressive political change. Because we've essentially put a price tag on freedom of expression. Whoever has the most money gets the loudest voice, dominating the visual and mental environment. The problem with this model is that there are some amazing messages that need to be said that aren't profitable to say. So you're never going to see them on a billboard.

The media plays an important role in developing our relationship with political change, mainly by ignoring politics and focusing on celebrities and scandals. But even when they do talk about important political issues, they do it in a way that I feel discourages engagement. And I'll give you an example: the Now magazine from last week –– progressive, downtown weekly in Toronto. This is the cover story. It's an article about a theater performance, and it starts with basic information about where it is, in case you actually want to go and see it after you've read the article –– where, the time, the website. Same with this –– it's a movie review, an art review, a book review –– where the reading is in case you want to go. A restaurant –– you might not want to just read about it, maybe you want to go to the restaurant. So they tell you where it is, what the prices are, the address, the phone number, etc.

Then you get to their political articles. Here's a great article about an important election race that's happening. It talks about the candidates –– written very well –– but no information, no follow–up, no websites for the campaigns, no information about when the debates are, where the campaign offices are. Here's another good article about a new campaign opposing privatization of transit without any contact information for the campaign. The message seems to be that the readers are most likely to want to eat, maybe read a book, maybe see a movie, but not be engaged in their community. And you might think this is a small thing, but I think it's important because it sets a tone and it reinforces the dangerous idea that politics is a spectator sport.

Heroes: How do we view leadership? Look at these 10 movies. What do they have in common? Anyone? They all have heroes who were chosen. Someone came up to them and said, "You're the chosen one. There's a prophesy. You have to save the world." And then someone goes off and saves the world because they've been told to, with a few people tagging along. This helps me understand why a lot of people have trouble seeing themselves as leaders. Because it sends all the wrong messages about what leadership is about. A heroic effort is a collective effort, number one. Number two, it's imperfect; it's not very glamorous; and it doesn't suddenly start and suddenly end. It's an ongoing process your whole life. But most importantly, it's voluntary. It's voluntary. As long as we're teaching our kids that heroism starts when someone scratches a mark on your forehead, or someone tells you that you're part of a prophecy, they're missing the most important characteristic of leadership, which is that it comes from within. It's about following your own dreams –– uninvited, uninvited –– and then working with others to make those dreams come true.

Political parties: oh boy. Political parties could and should be one of the basic entry points for people to get engaged in politics. Instead, they've become, sadly, uninspiring and uncreative organizations that rely so heavily on market research and polling and focus groups that they end up all saying the same thing, pretty much regurgitating back to us what we already want to hear at the expense of putting forward bold and creative ideas. And people can smell that, and it feeds cynicism. (Applause)

Charitable status: Groups who have charitable status in Canada aren't allowed to do advocacy. This is a huge problem and a huge obstacle to change, because it means that some of the most passionate and informed voices are completely silenced, especially during election time. Which leads us to the last one, which is our elections.

As you may have noticed, our elections in Canada are a complete joke. We use out–of–date systems that are unfair and create random results. Canada's currently led by a party that most Canadians didn't actually want. How can we honestly and genuinely encourage more people to vote when votes don't count in Canada? You add all this up together and of course people are apathetic. It's like trying to run into a brick wall.

Now I'm not trying to be negative by throwing all these obstacles out and explaining what's in our way. Quite the opposite: I actually think people are amazing and smart and that they do care. But that, as I said, we live in this environment where all these obstacles are being put in our way. As long as we believe that people, our own neighbors, are selfish, stupid or lazy, then there's no hope. But we can change all those things I mentioned. We can open up city hall. We can reform our electoral systems. We can democratize our public spaces.

My main message is, if we can redefine apathy, not as some kind of internal syndrome, but as a complex web of cultural barriers that reinforces disengagement, and if we can clearly define, we can clearly identify, what those obstacles are, and then if we can work together collectively to dismantle those obstacles, then anything is possible.

Thank you. (Applause)"

(Dave Meslin)

Fig.1 TEDxToronto 2010, filmed October 2011; posted April 2011

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TAGS

2010advocacyapathybarrier • bold ideas • campaignCanadacelebritychange • collective effort • community engagementcreative ideas • cultural barriers • cynicism • Dave Meslin • democracy • disengagement • electionsengagementexclusionfocus groupglamour • heroic effort • imperfectioninformationlazinessleadershipmedianeighbourhoodNike • obstacles • political change • political issuespolitical partiespoliticspollingprogressive political changeprogressive political perspectivepublic spacereform our electoral systemsscandalselfishness • spectator sport • stupidityTED TalksTorontotrivia • uncreative organisations • visual environment • voluntary

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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