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Which clippings match 'Visual Music' keyword pg.1 of 2
04 AUGUST 2014

Eduardo Paolozzi: Turkische Musik, 1974

"Eduardo Paolozzi's work often, as in the Türkische Musik series, may be printed in different color schemes or on different papers. All these elements combine to suggest that the image is often discovered in the act of creating it; the artist's role is integrally balanced between active calculation and chance. No longer confined to a single plan, the artist–printmaker and his work signify an exciting new order of print– making, one in which technological expertise becomes a useful vehicle for personal expression."

(Georgette Lee, 1986)

Precision of Image: Technology in Printed Art : 20 April – 7 September, 1986, The Joe and Emily Lowe Art Gallery at Syracuse University in Syracuse.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 FEBRUARY 2014

Norman McLaren's SYNCHROMY (1971)

"Here are pyrotechnics of the keyboard, but with only a camera to 'play the tune'. To make this film, Norman McLaren employed novel optical techniques to compose the piano rhythms of the sound track. These he then moved, in multicolor, onto the picture area of the screen so that, in effect, you see what you hear. It is synchronization of image and sound in the truest sense of the word."

(National Film Board of Canada)

Fig.1 Director: Norman McLaren; Year: 1971; Time: 7 mins; Music: Norman McLaren.

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TAGS

1971abstract animated filmabstract animation • audiovisual art • changing patterncolourcolour and music • coloured pattern • design formalismdirect filmelectronic musicexperimental music • image and sound • multicolour • musicalizes vision • National Film Board of CanadaNorman McLaren • novel optical techniques • optical composition • painted soundtrack • piano rhythms • picture area • pure abstractionsoundtracksymbiosissynaesthesia • Synchromy (1971) • synchronisationtangible sequencervisual abstractionvisual musicvisual pattern

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 FEBRUARY 2014

Raspberry Pi Box Lunch with Miller Puckette

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TAGS

1990sAndroid OS • BSD license • collaborative production • create music together • data • developer base • FreeBSD OS • FUDI (networking protocol) • GNU • Graphics Environment for Multimedia (GEM) • GridFlow • Institut de Recherche et Coordination Acoustique Musique (IRCAM) • interactive computer music • interactivityiOS • IRIX OS • LAN • Linux • live collaboration • Mac OS X • matrix processing • Max (software)Max/MSP • Miller Puckette • multimedia works • music making technology • open source project • OpenGL • PiDiP • Pure Data (Pd) • Pure Data Packet • Raspberry Pireal-timereal-time interactivity • San Diego Supercomputer Center • software programmeterminal connectionvirtual collaborationvisual musicvisual programming languageWindows OS

CONTRIBUTOR

Mik Parsons
07 DECEMBER 2013

A history of colour organs and visual music

"'The early history of this art was driven by an interest in color. In the eighteenth century, a Jesuit priest, Louis Bertrand Castel, invented the first color organ. Others, including D.D. Jameson, Bainbridge Bishop, and A. Wallace Rimington, created color organs through the next century [2]."

(Maura McDonnell, 2002)

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TAGS

1730 • 1742 • 18th century • Alexander Scriabin • Alexander Wallace Rimington • amplitudeanalogue correspondence • Arnaldo Ginna • Audiovisual Environment Suite (AVES) • Bainbridge Bishop • Bruno Corra • clavecin oculaire • Clavilux • colourcolour and music • colour and sound • colour light • colour music • colour organ • colour tone • coloured light • coloured notes • compositioncorrelative analogue • D.D. Jameson • experimental instrument • experimental musical instrumentFernand Leger • Fred Callopy • Georg Telemann • GesamtkunstwerkGolan LevinHans Richter • harpsichord • Harry SmithhueinventionJames WhitneyJohn Whitneykeyboard • Lejf Marcussen • Len Lye • Leopold Survage • light organ • Louis Bertrand Castel • Luigi RussoloMan RayMarcel Duchamp • Mary Ellen Bute • Maura McDonnell • music historymusical instrumentNorman McLaren • Ocular Harpsichord • organOskar Fischinger • Paul Friedlander • piano style keyboard • pitch to hue • projected light • Prometheus (mythology) • rhythmiclight • Roy De Maistre • soundStan Brakhagesynaesthesia • synesthesia • Thomas Wilfred • timbre • tone colour • Viking Eggelingvisual music • Wallace Rimington • Walter Ruttmann • Wurlitzer

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JUNE 2012

onformative a studio for generative design: unnamed soundsculpture

"The basic idea of the project is built upon the consideration of creating a moving sound sculpture from the recorded motion data of a real person. For our work we asked a Laura Keil, a berlin based dancer to interpret a musical piece – Kreukeltape by Machinenfabriek – as closely as possible with the movement of her own body. She was recorded by three depth cameras (Kinect), in which the intersection of the images was later put together to a three–dimensional volume (3d point cloud), doing so we were able to use the collected data throughout the further process.

The three–dimensional image allowed us a completely free handling of the digital camera, without limitations of the perspective. The camera also reacts to the sound and supports the physical imitation of the musical piece by the performer. She moves to a noise field, where a simple modification of the random seed can consistently create new versions of the video, each offering a different composition of the recorded performance. The multi–dimensionality of the sound sculpture is already contained in every movement of the dancer, as the camera footage allows any imaginable perspective.

Similar to painting, a single point appears to be still very abstract, but the more points are connected to each other, the more complex and concrete the image seems. The more perfect and complex the 'alternative worlds' we project and the closer together their point elements, the more tangible they become. A digital body, consisting of 22 000 points, thus seems so real that it comes to life again.

Using 3 different microsoft kinect cameras the movement of the dancer was recorded into those 3d pointclouds that were synced and exported as one large dataset as Krakatoa particle files to be loaded into 3ds max for further rendering and creation of the 3d scene including the camera movement that is controlled by the audio as well."

(Cedric Kiefer and Julia Laub, onformative a studio for generative design)

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TAGS

2012 • 3D point cloud • 3D pointclouds • 3D scene • 3ds Maxanalogue correspondenceanimationaudio controlledBerlinbodycamera footage • Cedric Kiefer • concrete image • connected points • creative practicedancedancer • Daniel Franke • depth cameras • design projectdesign studio • digital body • generative designgesture • Julia Laub • KinectKrakatoa (software) • Kreukeltape • large dataset • Laura Keil • Machinenfabriek • Microsoft Kinectmicrosoft kinect camera • modification of the random seed • motion datamovement • moving sound sculpture • multi-dimensionality • multiple perspectives • noise field • onformative • performerpersonal workperspective • physical imitation • Processing (software) • random seed • recorded motion data • recorded performance • sound sculpturespatial • spatial volume • studio for generative design • three-dimensional image • three-dimensional volume • transposing materials • unnamed soundsculpture • visual musicvisual spectaclevisualisationvolumetric particle rendering

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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