Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Computational Aesthetics' keyword pg.1 of 3
25 JANUARY 2015

Soundweaving: playing traditional Hungarian folk embroidery

"At the core of the Soundweaving project is the traditional cross–stitching pattern used in Hungarian folk embroidery transformed into sound by a punch card comb music player. The cross–stitch pattern of holes on the tape in the musical box were punched by the creator, Zsanett Szirmay.

In this case, the punched tape acts as the score. Embroidered shirts and pillows from the Transylvanian Bukovina, and from Kalotaszeg and Hungary served as a basis for the patterns. As part of the transformation, embroidery patterns turned into laser cut textile pieces, and cross–stitched patterns into melodies. Soundweaving equally stimulates all senses, and calls for interaction. The project uses multiple media and communicates on diverse planes, combining the borderlands of folk art, design and music. It belongs to the analogue and digital realms at the same time as the handmade embroidery is translated into laser cut patterns. At the same time, the visual world is presented in audio, or rather the graphic aspect of music gets a role in developing the tunes. Bálint Tárkány–Kovács, folk musician and composer was instrumental in the audio mapping and developing the tunes."

(Rita Mária Halasi, Moholy–Nagy Művészeti Egyetem, 2014)

1
2
3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

TAGS

2014analogue correspondence • Balint Tarkany-Kovacs • Bucovina • Carpathians • computational aesthetics • cross-stitch pattern • design and music • design student projectembroidered patternsembroidered textiles • embroidery pattern • folk decoration • handicraft • handmade embroidery • Hungarian folk embroidery • Hungary • Kalotaszeg • laser cut patterns • laser cut textile pieces • listening to imagesMA Textile Design • melodies • Moholy-Nagy Muveszeti Egyetem • music boxmusic player • musical box • musical scoreprogrammable device • punch card comb • punch cardspunched-card systemsequencer • Soundweaving project • traditional crafts • traditional handicrafts • Transylvania • Transylvanian Bukovina • Ukrainevisual pattern • weaving pattern • Zsanett Szirmay

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 DECEMBER 2013

Goldsmiths Department of Art MA: Computational Aesthetics

1

TAGS

2013algorithmic architecturecomputational aestheticscomputational arts • computational character • computational ordering • computational structures • computational systemscomputer artconceptual artcritical discoursedatabase as cultural formdigital aestheticsdigital artfine artGoldsmiths College (University of London)information systems • logico-mathematical means • Maria Beatrice Fazi • mathematicsmathesis • Matt Fuller • mediality • medium specificitymodern artmodes of existenceorder of thingsordering • present art • programmatic declaration • rule-based worksoftware studiessupermarketssystematisationtheory of substantial formsvideo lecturevisual art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 DECEMBER 2013

How calculus is changing architecture

"So, working with Bentley and MicroStation, we've written a custom piece of software that networks all of the components together into these chunks of information, so that if we change any element along the length of the building, not only does that change distribute through each one of the trusses, but each one of the trusses then distributes that information down the length of the entire facade of the building. So it's a single calculation for every single component of the building that we're adding onto. So, it's tens of millions of calculations just to design one connection between a piece of structural steel and another piece of structural steel. But what it gives us is a harmonic and synthesized relationship of all these components, one to another.

This idea has, kind of, brought me into doing some product design, and it's because design firms that have connections to architects, like, I'm working with Vitra, which is a furniture company, and Alessi, which is a houseware company. They saw this actually solving a problem: this ability to differentiate components but keep them synthetic. So, not to pick on BMW, or to celebrate them, but take BMW as an example. They have to, in 2005, have a distinct identity for all their models of cars. So, the 300 series, or whatever their newest car is, the 100 series that's coming out, has to look like the 700 series, at the other end of their product line, so they need a distinct, coherent identity, which is BMW. At the same time, there's a person paying 30,000 dollars for a 300–series car, and a person paying 70,000 dollars for a 700 series, and that person paying more than double doesn't want their car to look too much like the bottom–of–the–market car. So they have to also discriminate between these products. So, as manufacturing starts to allow more design options, this problem gets exacerbated, of the whole and the parts."

(Greg Lynn, February 2005)

1

TAGS

2005abnormalityalgorithmalgorithmic architecture • Antonio Gaudi • architecture • beautiful architecture • beauty • Bentley Motors • BMW • bridge • bubble diagram • buildingcalculation • calculus • Chris Williams • Christopher Wren • computational aestheticscontinuous series • curvature • custom software • dais • digital fabricationdigital toolsdimensions • Frei Otto • furniture • generic form • genetic evolutiongothic • Greg Bateson • Greg Lynn • harmonic • houseware • human-scale understandingideal form • intricacies of scale • Mannheim Concert Hall • manufacturingmathematics • MicroStation • model of beauty • model of nature • modular architecture • monstrosity • mutation • natural form • Norman Foster • parabola • part-whole thinking • physiological development • product designproduct differentiationproportions • Robert Maillart • structural abstractionstructural forcesstructural formstructuresymmetrysynthesised relationship • teratology • vertebrae • Vitra • vocabulary of form • William Bateson

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 MARCH 2013

Mathematics is the foundation of activities such as knitting, stitching, measuring and cutting that are crucial to crafting and fabrication

The exhibition "Beauty is the First Test" runs form 27 April – 30 June 2013 at The National Centre for Craft & Design, Navigation Wharf, Carre Street, Sleaford, Lincolnshire NG34, UK.

"The group show explores how mathematical concepts underpin craft techniques, aiming to 'demystify a subject that intimates both adults and children', according to the centre. The exhibition demonstrates how mathematics is the foundation of activities such as knitting, stitching, measuring and cutting that are crucial to crafting and fabrication. Showcasing works in disciplines including textiles and sculpture, the show will feature work from artists including Michael Brennand–Wood, Janice Gunner, Lucy McMullen and Ann Sutton.

Alongside the visual proof that maths can indeed be fun – and pretty – the exhibition also presents case studies of five makers, including Gail Baxter and Margo Selby, exploring how the development of their work was furthered by an understanding and appreciation of mathematics."

(Emily Gosling, 27 March 2013, Design Week)

Fig.1 Janette Matthews, "Optical Ellipse". Fig.2 Ann Sutton, "Four Ways from a Square", 2009.

1

2

TAGS

2013algorithmic art • Ann Sutton • Beauty is the First Test (exhibition) • computational aestheticscraft techniquescraftingDesign Weekexhibition • fractal art • Gail Baxter • geometric abstractiongeometric formsgeometric shapes • Godfrey Hardy • group exhibitionharmony • Janette Matthews • Janice Gunner • knitting • Lesley Halliwell • Lucy McMullen • Margo Selby • mathematical abstractionmathematical conceptsmathematical patternmathematicsmaths • Michael Brennand-Wood • National Centre for Craft and Designpattern • Peter Randall-Page • sculpture • spirograph • Stella Harding • Suresh Dutt • textilesvisual abstractionweaving

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 MARCH 2013

Resolume: VJ Software for producing realtime generated visuals

"Resolume is created by Edwin de Koning & Bart van der Ploeg together with Tim Walther, Daniel Berio, Joris de Jong, Menno Vink and a few specialized freelancers.

Resolume was born because we wanted to VJ. But we wanted to do it better. Back in 1998 VJ–ing was done with VHS tapes and an mx50 video mixer so it was hard to quickly improvise video to music because tempo could not be adjusted, or even reversed. Effects were limited to what the mx50 had to offer. We thought software would allow us to improvise more and be a better VJ.

We could not find any VJ software that did what we wanted back in 1998 so we started programming our own. We quickly realized our software was much better than our VJ–ing so we work on Resolume full–time since 2002."

(Edwin de Koning and Bart van der Ploeg)

1
2

TAGS

2002algorithmic artaudiovisual performance • Bart van der Ploeg • computational aestheticscomputer graphics • Daniel Berio • Edwin de Koning • generative designinteractive performanceinteractive visualisation • Joris de Jong • kinetic animationlive animationlive performancelooping • lumotion • Menno Vink • Panasonic WJ-MX50 • Panasonic WJ-MX50 video mixer • projection artreactive graphicsrealtime animationrealtime generated visuals • Resolume (software) • Tim Walther • triggering • video jockey • video mixer • video sampling • visual abstraction • visual performer • visual spectaclevisualsVJ • VJ Loops • VJ software • VJ-ing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.