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Which clippings match 'RAW' keyword pg.1 of 1
12 DECEMBER 2013

Digital Bolex: 16mm Filmmaking Goes Digital

"Most film students now use DSLRs. But for those who want a digital tool to produce more film–like images, Bolex – one of the classic 16mm camera makers – recently started shipping a digital 16mm–equivalent video camera that's fully compatible with the most desirable vintage C–mount lenses.

The new Bolex camera, dubbed the D16, doesn't just sport a retro look. Its Kodak–produced CCD sensor is very close to Super 16–sized, which is uncommon in modern cameras. Even better, that sensor shoots in RAW at 32 frames per second at a resolution of 2048x1152 pixels. Every uncompressed frame should be sharp, as opposed to the compressed footage even full–frame DSLRs produce. Plus, the Super 16–sized sensor means that the D16 can use C–mount lenses without any crop factor.

The camera is being produced under the name 'Digital Bolex,' but it's actually a joint venture between the original manufacturer, Bolex International, S.A., and Cinemeridian, Inc, a young company of digital wizards that was formed to bring this idea to fruition."

(Kif Leswing, 11 December 2013, Wired.com)

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16mm • 16mm-equivalent • 2012 • 32 fps • Blackmagic • Bolex • Bolex camera • Bolex D16 • Bolex International S.A. • C-mount lens • camera • camera maker • camera technology • CCD sensor • cinematic devices • Cinemeridian Inc • classic 16mm camera • compressed footage • D16 • digital • Digital Bolex • digital cameradigital cinema technologydigital pictures • digital tool • digital viewfinder • DSLR • film and video equipment • film camera • film school • film-like images • ilm grain • image qualityindependent cinemaindie filmmaker • joint venture • KickstarterKodak • moviemaking • old-school • pistol grip • RAW • retro look • sensor • Serious Cinema • stereo audio • Super 16mm • test footage • uncompressed frame • video camera • XLR

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 MAY 2013

Video post-production workflow for 5D Mark III RAW footage in OSX

"You have probably seen our extensive written guide on how to get Magic Lantern's 24p working on the 5D Mark III, which also includes a step–by–step instruction on how to end up with usable ProRes 4444 files.

Well, as it turns out, Sebastian here has found a much more straightforward way to post process the raw files from the 5D Mark III which allows us to skip the relatively cumbersome After Effects conversion process. This new process only utilizes Adobe Photoshop's raw import module, which allows batch processing of files (which is necessary to apply the same settings onto an entire clip consisting of individual DNG files).

Watch our video with a step–by–step instruction on how to end up with editable post–processed files!"

(Nino Leitner, 16 May 2013, cinema5D)

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24pAdobe PhotoshopAfter Effectsbatch processingCanon EOS 5D mark IIIcolour correctioncolour gradingdigital cinematographydigital filmmakingDNGfile conversion processfilm exposure • image compression • image qualityMagic Lantern (software)OSXpost-processingpost-productionpost-production workflow • ProRes 4444 • QuickTimeRAW • RAW footage • raw import module • step-by-step instructionsTIFF • TIFF sequence • video imagevideo post-production • video post-production workflow • video processingworkflow

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 MAY 2013

The 5D mark III can do 25fps in RAW 1080p

"It's a revolutionary time for indie filmmakers: A RAW module for Magic Lantern was enabled last Sunday that hacks your Canon EOS 5D mark III to shoot 14bit RAW video in 24p and we just found out it also works in 25p."

(Sebastian Wöber, 17th May 2013, cinema5D)

The top video was recorded with the standard H.264 ALL–I CODEC, while the bottom was recorded as raw footage.

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1080p • 14bit RAW video • 24p25 fps • 25p • bracketing • camera exposure • Canon DSLRCanon EOS 5D mark III • Canon firmware • CF card • colour saturation • compact flash • digital cinematographydigital filmmaking • Fast Zebras • film exposureFPS • FPS control • HDR • HDR bracketing • high definition video • highlight rolloff • image captureimage contrastimage qualityindie filmmakerISO • ISO control • Magic Lantern (software)RAWvideo image

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 MAY 2011

Digital Negative: Adobe's publicly available archival photo format

"Raw file formats are becoming extremely popular in digital photography workflows because they offer creative professionals greater creative control. However, cameras can use many different raw formats – the specifications for which are not publicly available – which means that not every raw file can be read by a variety of software applications. As a result, the use of these proprietary raw files as a long–term archival solution carries risk, and sharing these files across complex workflows is even more challenging.

The solution to this growing problem is Digital Negative (DNG), a publicly available archival format for the raw files generated by digital cameras. By addressing the lack of an open standard for the raw files created by individual camera models, DNG helps ensure that photographers will be able to access their files in the future.

Within a year of its introduction, several dozen software manufacturers such as Extensis, Canto, Apple, and iView developed support for DNG. And respected camera manufacturers such as Hasselblad, Leica, Casio, Ricoh, and Samsung have introduced cameras that provide direct DNG support."

(Adobe Systems Incorporated.)

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2004AdobeAdobe PhotoshopAdobe Systems IncApplearchival • archival format • archival solution • archiving • authentic resource • camera manufacturers • Canto • Casio • complex workflows • creative professionalsdigital • digital cameras • digital image preservationdigital negative • Digital Negative (DNG) • digital photographyDNG • Extensis • Hasselblad • intellectual propertyinteroperability • iView • Leica • metadata • open raw image format • open standardpreservationpreserving digital imagesproprietary • proprietary format • RAWraw file • Raw file format • RAW files • raw formats • reverse engineeringRicohroyalty freeSamsung • software applications • solutionspecification • standard format • standardisationtechnologyTIFFusabilityworkflow

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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