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Which clippings match 'Adobe Photoshop' keyword pg.1 of 1
22 SEPTEMBER 2014

Future Knowledge: Lev Manovich Interview

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21st centuryAdobe IllustratorAdobe PhotoshopAfter Effects • always-changing field • contemporary designcontemporary media • contemporary media software • cultural artefactsdigital cultureearly 20th centuryearly 21st centuryelectronic technologiesFinal Cut ProGoogle Earthinteractive environments • interface to the world • interfaces • Lev ManovichMaya • mechanical technologies • media • media applications • media authoring • media machinemedia sharing • media-specific tools • medias access • memory • our imagination • physical technologies • software • software for media authoring • Software Takes Command • The Language of New Mediathe medium • theory of the technology • tools shape • universal engine • universal language • visual aestheticsweb services

CONTRIBUTOR

Neal White
23 MAY 2013

Video post-production workflow for 5D Mark III RAW footage in OSX

"You have probably seen our extensive written guide on how to get Magic Lantern's 24p working on the 5D Mark III, which also includes a step–by–step instruction on how to end up with usable ProRes 4444 files.

Well, as it turns out, Sebastian here has found a much more straightforward way to post process the raw files from the 5D Mark III which allows us to skip the relatively cumbersome After Effects conversion process. This new process only utilizes Adobe Photoshop's raw import module, which allows batch processing of files (which is necessary to apply the same settings onto an entire clip consisting of individual DNG files).

Watch our video with a step–by–step instruction on how to end up with editable post–processed files!"

(Nino Leitner, 16 May 2013, cinema5D)

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24pAdobe PhotoshopAfter Effectsbatch processingCanon EOS 5D mark IIIcolour correctioncolour gradingdigital cinematographydigital filmmakingDNGfile conversion processfilm exposure • image compression • image qualityMagic Lantern (software)OSXpost-processingpost-productionpost-production workflow • ProRes 4444 • QuickTimeRAW • RAW footage • raw import module • step-by-step instructionsTIFF • TIFF sequence • video imagevideo post-production • video post-production workflow • video processingworkflow

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 MARCH 2012

Wacom Inkling: a digital drawing pen for artists

"Wacom's Inkling pen has caused quite a buzz in the creative community. A ballpoint pen with a tracker in it that records your strokes to a small box you can carry with you, it's been described as the ideal digital tool for artists who prefer real pens to digital substitutes. ...

One key thing to be said about the Inkling is that it's not a replacement for traditional drawing pens. The captured digital files are not a full–quality representation of a drawing. But then Wacom have stated clearly that the Inkling is for sketching –– even if that has been drowned out a little by the overstretching enthusiasm from some online commentators.

'The line was certainly not as crisp as it was hand–drawn,' [illustrator Lizzie Mary Cullen] notes. 'The layer function is amazing but when uploaded some of the layers appeared to have moved ever so slightly. The line simply isn't as true as a scan, and that is exactly why it's for brainstorming, sketching and rough drawings as opposed to polished artworks."

(Neil Bennett, 08 September 2011, Digital Arts)

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Adobe IllustratorAdobe Photoshopartwork • Autodesk Sketchbook Pro • ballpoint • ballpoint penbirodevicedigital artworkdigital drawingdoodledrawing • drawing onto the screen • hand-drawnillustration • Inkling • Inkling pen • input device • Intuos tablet • learning materialspaper • pen • pen and paper • pressure sensitive • pressure sensitivity • Rotring Rapidograph • sketch • SketchBook Designer • SketchManager • stationary • stylus • tabletvector graphicWacom • Wacom Guido Moller • Wacom Inkling

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 NOVEMBER 2011

Love in a Very Cold Climate: The Observer/Cape Graphic Short Story Prize 2011 winner

"For Isabel Greenberg, the winner of this year's Observer/ Jonathan Cape/Comica graphic short story prize, it is a case of third time lucky. 'I'd entered twice before,' she says. 'And once, I'd been a runner–up. But to win is such a nice thing. I'm so happy about it. Everyone tells you when you leave art school that it is going to be hard, but you never really know quite how hard until you're out there. It can be a bit depressing.' How will she spend her £1,000 prize money? 'I'm not sure. I should do something really sensible, like buy myself a copy of Photoshop.' She laughs. 'Or maybe 500 bottles of Winsor & Newton ink.'

Greenberg, who is 23, graduated from the University of Brighton, where she studied illustration, last year. She is now working as a freelance illustrator, and trying to finish her first graphic novel. Her winning entry, Love in a Very Cold Climate, tells the story of a marriage – only this couple, a south pole dweller and a north pole dweller, will never be able to touch one another, surrounded as they are by a magnetic force field. It's beautifully drawn, of course, from first to last frame, but it's also exquisitely written. In particular, the judges admired the way Greenberg handles time, somehow capturing a shared lifetime in just four pages."

(Rachel Cooke, 6 November 2011)

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2011Adobe PhotoshopAntarcticaArcticcomic book artComica • Comica graphic short story prize • creative practicedrawing • force field • forcefield • freelance illustratorgraphic novelillustrationillustrative styleink • Isabel Greenberg • Jonathan Cape • lifetime • Love in a Very Cold Climate • magnetic • magnetic force field • North Pole • South Polespeculative fictionstorytimeUKUniversity of Brightonvisual communication • Winsor and Newton

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 MAY 2011

Digital Negative: Adobe's publicly available archival photo format

"Raw file formats are becoming extremely popular in digital photography workflows because they offer creative professionals greater creative control. However, cameras can use many different raw formats – the specifications for which are not publicly available – which means that not every raw file can be read by a variety of software applications. As a result, the use of these proprietary raw files as a long–term archival solution carries risk, and sharing these files across complex workflows is even more challenging.

The solution to this growing problem is Digital Negative (DNG), a publicly available archival format for the raw files generated by digital cameras. By addressing the lack of an open standard for the raw files created by individual camera models, DNG helps ensure that photographers will be able to access their files in the future.

Within a year of its introduction, several dozen software manufacturers such as Extensis, Canto, Apple, and iView developed support for DNG. And respected camera manufacturers such as Hasselblad, Leica, Casio, Ricoh, and Samsung have introduced cameras that provide direct DNG support."

(Adobe Systems Incorporated.)

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2004AdobeAdobe PhotoshopAdobe Systems IncApplearchival • archival format • archival solution • archiving • authentic resource • camera manufacturers • Canto • Casio • complex workflows • creative professionalsdigital • digital cameras • digital image preservationdigital negative • Digital Negative (DNG) • digital photographyDNG • Extensis • Hasselblad • intellectual propertyinteroperability • iView • Leica • metadata • open raw image format • open standardpreservationpreserving digital imagesproprietary • proprietary format • RAWraw file • Raw file format • RAW files • raw formats • reverse engineeringRicohroyalty freeSamsung • software applications • solutionspecification • standard format • standardisationtechnologyTIFFusabilityworkflow

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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