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13 APRIL 2012

Another Graphic Design Graduate: So Much Left to Learn

"Butcher's Hook is a design studio in London's Portobello formed by soon–to–be graduates of Kingston University and LCC in response to a D&AD brief in which students are encouraged to Make Their Mark.

It was featured on Creative Review's blog this morning.

http://www.creativereview.co.uk/cr–blog/2012/april/butchers–hook–say–hello

By providing 'design for the local community' with a pledge to spend at least 10% of their time working on community projects, the students have started their own design agency and they haven't even left college yet.

Whilst Creative Review seem impressed by the students' ambitious move away from the computer screen to find their own work, it is clear these graduates haven't ventured into industry yet. Whilst I am happy to celebrate the initiative and drive that these students clearly have and I do not deny their talent and bravery, I am rather cynical of its potential. With 6 months experience, I am struggling to find a job in London and, like many graduates, have considered setting out on my own. What has prevented me from doing anything more than mildly pondering over the thought, is my lack of knowledge and experience.

Working on your own, or in a small team requires flawless Mac [computer] skills, impeccable design skills and not to mention bravery and confidence. It is also worth considering that client liaison skills can not be forged over night and the time and attention this occupies should not be underestimated. I once worked with an agency that was not much more than a year old and I didn't see them design anything all week. The agency was made up of just the two of them, and whilst their work is impressive and their client list respectable, they spent almost the entire day liaising with clients, organising the next week's schedule and discussing production. Whilst I have nothing good in terms of design to show from that placement, I can't deny I came out much more knowledgeable and more certain that I wasn't ready for that yet. The two of them had at least 8 years experience from a top London design agency, which not only prepared them for production and project management alongside design, but no doubt aided their client list too.

For me, The Butcher's Hook epitomises what is wrong with graduates. University teaches ideas, a little in the way of typographic principle and basic Adobe operation skills. Most importantly, university teaches arrogance. It wasn't until I started my first placement, I realised how little I actually knew. Idealistic tutors cherish the students' naivete and love for design, and keep from them what the reality is like. My biggest fear about starting out on my own would be the lack of good projects, which is something well–established agencies can provide you with. On your own, a new and unreliable studio, you lack the knowledge and experience that can get you good clients with impressive budgets. Low budget work can be dull to design and the project management and client liaison can become stressful. Designing on a budget is harder. Students only design ideas and don't often have to worry about the production costs and client needs. I would be interested to see what local community work these graduates get at Butcher's Hook, and whether they have the stamina and love for design to keep it going. I wish them good luck, but wouldn't encourage other graduates to do the same. Never underestimate how much you have left to learn."

(anonymous, 5 April 2012)

TAGS

2012Adobe • Adobe Creative Suite Design Premium • Adobe Creative Suite Master Collection • Adobe software • Another Graphic Design Graduate (blog) • arrogance • business realityButchers Hookclient liaison • client liaison skills • client list • client needs • community projects • computer skillsCreative Review (magazine)D and ADdesign agencydesign business • design for the local community • design graduatesdesign ideasdesign industrydesign skillsdesign softwaredesign studentdesign studio • designing on a budget • find a job • get a jobgraduategraduatesgraphic design graduate • graphic design intern • graphic designeridealistic tutorsindustry placementinternshipKingston Universityknowledge and experience • lack of experience • lack of knowledge • LCC • liaising with clients • London • love for design • low budget • Mac skills • make their mark • my first placement • naive • production management • project managementrequirements gathering • setting out on your own • small team • starting out on your own • typographic principlesUK • well-established agencies • working on your own

CONTRIBUTOR

Shaun Belcher
11 MARCH 2012

Joshua Nimoy: representing digital culture in film

"I take representing digital culture in film very seriously in lieu of having grown up in a world of very badly researched user interface greeble. I cringed during the part in Hackers (1995) when a screen saver with extruded 'equations' is used to signify that the hacker has reached some sort of neural flow or ambiguous destination. I cringed for Swordfish and Jurassic Park as well. I cheered when Trinity in The Matrix used nmap and ssh (and so did you). Then I cringed again when I saw that inevitably, Hollywood had decided that nmap was the thing to use for all its hacker scenes (see Bourne Ultimatum, Die Hard 4, Girl with Dragon Tattoo, The Listening, 13: Game of Death, Battle Royale, Broken Saints, and on and on). In Tron, the hacker was not supposed to be snooping around on a network; he was supposed to kill a process. So we went with posix kill and also had him pipe ps into grep. I also ended up using emacs eshell to make the terminal more l33t. The team was delighted to see my emacs performance –– splitting the editor into nested panes and running different modes. I was tickled that I got emacs into a block buster movie. I actually do use emacs irl, and although I do not subscribe to alt.religion.emacs, I think that's all incredibly relevant to the world of Tron."

(Joshua T. Nimoy)

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TAGS

13: Game of Death • Adobe • alt.religion.emacs • Andy King • art of code • Battle Royale • blockbuster • Bourne Ultimatum • Bradley Munkowitz • Broken Saints • C++CG • CG artist • Cinema 4D • code • Consumer eXperience Design • CXD • David Lewandowski • Die Hard 4 • digital culture • Digital Domain • Emacs • emacs eshell • emacs irl • Eshell • film • Girl with Dragon Tattoo • GREPhacker • Hackers (film) • Hollywood • Houdini (software) • Jake Sargeant • Jurassic Park (film) • l33t • Linux • Media and Visual Designer • network • nmap • OpenFrameworksOpenGL • pipe ps • POSIX • posix kill • Processing (software) • screen saver • software artspecial effects • SSH • Swordfish (film) • terminal • The Listening • The Matrix (1999)Tron • TRON: Legacy • user interfaceVFX • wxWidgets

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 MAY 2011

Video for Wikipedia: Guide to Best Practices

"This new effort takes advantage of a movement toward open video – a movement that has its roots in the free software movement that is largely powering the web today and which, through companies such as Apache, IBM, Mozilla, Oracle and Red Hat, has resulted in trillions of dollars of value creation for the stakeholders involved. The open or open–source video movement recognizes the contributions from, but also the limitations inherent in, the video work of industry leaders such as Adobe, Apple, and Microsoft. Flash, Quicktime, Windows Media and Silverlight are handsome technologies. But they have been developed and controlled by commercial companies that often protect themselves against innovations by outside coders, designers, developers, programmers – technologists, lawyers, producers, and educators keen to move away from proprietary solutions that are delivered for the benefit of shareholders first and the billions of everyday people who connect via the web a pale second.

The open video movement recognizes the importance of rights and licensing strategies designed to create profit or serve national interests, but it is critical of systems that prohibit access to film and sound assets becoming part of our collective audiovisual canon. Many film and sound resources digitized for preservation, for example, do not appear online because of dated copyright rules; and some of the great investments (millions of dollars in fact) by, for example, the U.K. government in film and sound resource digitization result in materials being put online only behind educational and national paywalls that keep students in Nairobi and Nashville from using London–based resources in their work.

Enabling video to catch up to the open–source movement on the web goes to the heart of our efforts to improve our understanding of the world. The central technologies of the web – HTML, HTTP, and TCP/IP – are open for all to build upon and improve, and video's future should be similarly unobstructed."

(Peter B. Kaufman, 2010)

Fig.1 Kid Kameleon, CC BY SA NC

2). Video for Wikipedia and the Open Web October 2010 An Intelligent Television White Paper PETER B. KAUFMAN INTELLIGENT TELEVISION WWW.INTELLIGENTTELEVISION.COM THE OPEN VIDEO ALLIANCE Version 1.0

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TAGS

2010AdobeAdobe FlashApache Software Foundation (ASF)AppleaudiovisualBBC archiveBritish Film InstituteBritish Governmentcontent rightscopyrightcopyright rulesdigitisation • educational paywalls • film resources • free software movement • HTML • HTTP • IBMinnovationLibrary of Congress • licensing strategies • media resources • MicrosoftMITMozillaNairobi • Nashville • national paywalls • open sourceopen video • open-source movement • open-source video movement • Oracle Corporation • ownership • paywall • preservation • proprietary solutions • proprietary technologiesQuickTime • Red Hat (Linux) • remix cultureSilverlightsound resources • U.S. National Archives • value creationWikipedia • Windows Media • Yale University

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 MAY 2011

Digital Negative: Adobe's publicly available archival photo format

"Raw file formats are becoming extremely popular in digital photography workflows because they offer creative professionals greater creative control. However, cameras can use many different raw formats – the specifications for which are not publicly available – which means that not every raw file can be read by a variety of software applications. As a result, the use of these proprietary raw files as a long–term archival solution carries risk, and sharing these files across complex workflows is even more challenging.

The solution to this growing problem is Digital Negative (DNG), a publicly available archival format for the raw files generated by digital cameras. By addressing the lack of an open standard for the raw files created by individual camera models, DNG helps ensure that photographers will be able to access their files in the future.

Within a year of its introduction, several dozen software manufacturers such as Extensis, Canto, Apple, and iView developed support for DNG. And respected camera manufacturers such as Hasselblad, Leica, Casio, Ricoh, and Samsung have introduced cameras that provide direct DNG support."

(Adobe Systems Incorporated.)

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TAGS

2004AdobeAdobe PhotoshopAdobe Systems IncApplearchival • archival format • archival solution • archiving • authentic resource • camera manufacturers • Canto • Casio • complex workflows • creative professionalsdigital • digital cameras • digital image preservationdigital negative • Digital Negative (DNG) • digital photographyDNG • Extensis • Hasselblad • intellectual propertyinteroperability • iView • Leica • metadata • open raw image format • open standardpreservationpreserving digital imagesproprietary • proprietary format • RAWraw file • Raw file format • RAW files • raw formats • reverse engineeringRicohroyalty freeSamsung • software applications • solutionspecification • standard format • standardisationtechnologyTIFFusabilityworkflow

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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