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Which clippings match 'Vertical Discourses' keyword pg.1 of 1
29 JUNE 2013

PATHWAYS AND GATEWAYS: the structure and regulation of UK architectural education

"Architectural education has proved to be a valuable part of UK higher education in the last fifty years and it has developed a strong international reputation for excellence in both teaching and research. The recent changes to higher education funding and the changing nature of professional practice have contributed to an evolving environment for UK architectural education where flexibility and innovation are increasingly important factors for continuing success. Revisions to the European Union requirements for architectural education are also contributing to this changing and uncertain environment. It has become clear to many of those most closely involved in UK architectural education that if the sector is to continue to develop and flourish some change in its regulatory framework is required in order that adequate responses can evolve and be encouraged.

The title of the report refers to the principal elements of the regulatory framework. The term 'pathway' is used to describe the route taken to registration and the term 'gateway' is used to describe thresholds through which candidates must pass in order to gain entry into the profession. This preliminary report seeks to summarise the context in which UK architectural education operates and to suggest proposals for reform which can hopefully gather support across the full spectrum of stakeholders. The intention of the Review Group is to publish a final report by October 2013."

(The UK Architectural Education Review Group, April 2013)

TAGS

2013architectural educationarchitectural pedagogyarchitectural practicearchitecture designarchitecture schools • career pathway • changing environmentchanging needschanging timescreative industriesdesign careerdesign industrydesign professionalsEuropean Unionflexibility and innovationhigher education • higher education funding • international reputation • professionprofessional certificationprofessional practiceprofessionalisationregulatory frameworkreport • SCHOSA • Standing Conference of Heads of Schools of Architecture • teaching and researchtuition feesUK • UK Architectural Education Review Group • uncertain environment • vertical discourses

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 MAY 2011

Stop funding Mickey Mouse degrees, says top scientist (a plea to stall the advancement of regionalising discourses)

"A leading scientist has attacked the government for funding students doing 'Mickey Mouse' degrees – and called for the money to be spent on science instead.

Dr Richard Pike, chief executive of the Royal Society of Chemistry, said degrees in celebrity journalism, drama combined with waste management, and international football business management – all of which exist – should be 'kicked into touch'.

Funds for the courses should be channelled into science degrees and research. ...

Pike said degree courses should reflect the challenges the country will face in the future, rather than an 'ephemeral demand that in 10 years' time will be viewed as a curiosity'. ...

'Funding for the sciences should be ringfenced so that, in effect, it becomes a more dominant component. This is not a question of pleading a special case. Such a move is essential if we are all to enjoy the lifestyle we have become accustomed to, and ensure that we are prepared for the changes that will affect us all in the future.

'We need a population with an enduring set of skills, such as an understanding of the physical world around us, literacy and communication, numeracy, and how to function and continue to learn in a complex society.'"

(Jessica Shepherd, 10 February 2010, guardian.co.uk)

[While Dr Richard Pike is making a noble effort –it is a vain one. His plea is a naive attempt to stall the advancement of regionalising discourses (Bernstein 2000, p.52) as they continue to undermine the authority of the strong classification principles (Bernstein 2000, p.99) of the traditional European Enlightenment university disciplinary model (Nussbaum 1997; Weeks and Glyer 1998). His comments fail to recognise dramatic global technological and sociological changes (Beck, Giddens et al. 1994) which have accelerated the pace of change and whose needs steadily diminish the relevance and potency of traditional scholarly insight.

Beck, U., A. Giddens, et al. (1994). Reflexive Modernization Politics Tradition and Aesthetics in the Modern Social Order. Stanford California, Stanford University Press.

Bernstein, B. (2000). Pedagogy Symbolic Control and Identity Theory Research Critique. Oxford, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.

Boyer, E. L. (1990). Scholarship Reconsidered Priorities Of The Professoriate. Scholarship Reconsidered Priorities Of The Professoriate. New York, Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching: 15–16.

Nussbaum, M. (1997). Cultivating Humanity: A Classical Defense of Reform in Liberal Education. Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard University Press.

Weeks, D. L. and D. Glyer (1998). The Liberal Arts in Higher Education. Challenging Assumptions Exploring Possibilities. Lanham, Maryland, University Press of America.]

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TAGS

Alistair Darling • an enduring set of skills • celebrity journalism • classification principles • complex society • cultural forms • cuts and closures • disciplinary knowledgedisciplinary protectionismDrama with Waste ManagementEuropean Enlightenment • fundamental sciences • fundinghigher educationHigher Education Funding Council for England • international football business management • knowledge regionalisation • leading-edge work • Mickey Mousenumeracyphysical worldpublic money • put the genie back in the bottle • reflexive modernisationregionalisation of knowledge • regionalising discourses • research fundingRichard Pike • ringfencing • Royal Society of Chemistry • RSCscholarshipscience • traditional scholarly endeavour • university degrees • university disciplinary model • vertical discourses • waste management

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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