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Which clippings match 'Slice Of Frozen Time' keyword pg.1 of 2
12 DECEMBER 2014

Sex Criminals: high-concept comic book about time freezing deviance

"Suzie's a normal girl with an extraordinary ability: when she has sex, she stops time. One night she meets Jon... who has the same gift. And so they do what any other sex–having, time–stopping, couple would do: they rob banks."

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2013alternative cartoons • alternative culture • arresting time • bank robbing • Chip Zdarsky • comedy seriescomic bookcomicscriminal actsdeviance • deviant desires • formal conceit • freeze time • frozen in the momentfrozen in timefrozen momentgraphic novelhigh concept • Image Comics • in media resindividual gaininterzoneliminality • Matt Fraction • mature readers • moment of climaxopportunityorgasmpetite mort • robbing banks • rule of law • sex comedy • Sex Criminals (comic book) • slice of frozen timespeculative fictionthefttime

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 DECEMBER 2012

Flixel: an interactive animated GIF app for iPhone

"Flixel was created as a result of seeing the incredible work of Kevin Burg & Jamie Beck (via their cinemagraphs.com site). After seeing this mesmerizing new artform, we set out to create a tool and a platform to bring it to a wider audience – the 'Polaroid' of cinemagraphs, if you will.

We owe Flixel's existence to the pioneering efforts of Kevin Burg & Jamie Beck, but we've also found a lot of other professional–level cinemagraph artists out there."

(Flixel Photos Inc., 2012)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JUNE 2012

Tabitha Soren: in-between narratives capturing stories in flux

"Sometimes it's simply looking at a particular behavior in a new way that evokes a range of emotions. Photographer Tabitha Soren has created a series of photographs, Running, that stir up feelings of panic, tension, curiosity, and concern. Tabitha's photographs have power in their simplicity, and it's as if one edge of her photograph is the past and one is the future, creating an in–between narrative that captures a story in flux. As viewers, we are caught in a pivotal moment of cinematic tension, requiring us to imagine what came before and what comes after each image. The photographs become a series of short stories that seem to shout 'get me the hell out of here.'"

(Aline Smithson, 23 May 2012, Lenscratch)

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a story in flux • arresting imagesarresting time • cinematic photography • cinematic tensionconcerncuriosityemotionfeelings of panicget me the hell out of here • in flux • in media resin-betweenin-between narratives • influx • lookingnarrative photographynarrative scenespanicphotographerphotographspivotal momentrunningseries • series of photographs • series of short storiesslice of frozen timeslicedstasis • stir up feelings of panic • story • Tabitha Soren • tensionvisual spectaclewhat came beforewhat comes afterwoman photographerworld of the story

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 APRIL 2011

Flickr: Anatomy of a Long Photograph

"Earlier this month flickr announced that short video clips could now be uploaded to the popular photo site. Some photo purists were skeptical, even spawning a huge 'No Video on Flickr' group. After all, the sanctity of the best still images, rich in implied meaning, could be diluted by zillions 90 second video clips of someone's keg party (and we already have other sites, like YouTube for that). Flickr said the ninety–second limit was to encourage 'long photos.' There are contemporary videographers and filmmakers who have used video or film to create sublime still images: the best long photos. And one of my favorites is Godfrey Reggio.

I will never forget the first time I saw Koyaanisqatsi, Reggio's 1983 film about contemporary 'life out of balance.' I was mesmerized by his long drawn out shots. It gave me time to study the scene and, in part, that was the point: to stop moving and consider the consequences of going through life at an increasing interstellar speed. Sometimes there was lots of activity in the frame. But there were times when he pointed his camera at a scene that, on first glance, appeared to be a photograph. It was a still image with all the implications connected with still photography: observations of a slice of frozen time and a consideration of the photographer's framing and associations within that frame.

Yet given the chance to observe closely there was movement. The characters in this 'still' were breathing and blicking and moving. When I saw his scene of Las Vegas waitresses standing still but not still, I was blown away (the vernacular I used in the early 80s when I first saw the film). To this day it is my most favorite scene of any movie I have ever watched. I literally held my breath for its entire duration wondering how long it would go on. The intensity of that shot was immense. It forced me to really look. And that has always been my goal as a photographer: to make people observe what's going on inside my images for as long as I can. That is the mark of a successful photograph. Not so easy in a culture heavy with daily sound and sight bites always vying for our attention and beckoning us to move quickly from one to another."

(Jeff Gates, 21April 2008, Life Outtacontext)

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TAGS

19832008 • 90 seconds • choreography • environmental portrait • Flickr • Godfrey Reggio • intensity • Koyaanisqatsi (1982) • Las Vegas • life out of balance • living pictures • long drawn out shots • long photo • long photos • motion photograph • ninety-seconds • observationphotograph • short video clips • shotslice of frozen time • standing still • stasisstill imagestop moving and consider the consequences • study the scene • video clipwaitressYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 FEBRUARY 2004

Frozen In The Moment: Into The Void

The short 16mm film; "A Little Death" evolved from an earlier (speculative) project entitled "Into The Void". This project problematised issues of space (zone, boundary, intersection) through their instigation as narrative actors. The project enquired: How do 3D people live up to idealised 2D representations? What happens if an individual who doesn't 'belong' is given the chance to 'fit in' & remains dislocated? As Frank turns to reach out and touch his surrounds he finds them to be flat and lifeless representations – literally a 2D world of backdrops hanging one foot in front of his face – mirrors of his own subjectivity. Will he locate himself within this shifting but lifeless tableau or escape into the void beyond?
(Simon Perkins & Paul Swadel, September 1993)

[The project was conceptualised in part as a play on Edouard Manet's 'Olympia' (and its reframing of Titian's 'The Venus of Urbino'.]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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