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Which clippings match 'Open-ended Questions' keyword pg.1 of 1
20 SEPTEMBER 2013

The Mass Observation Archive: a UK social history writing project

"The Mass Observation Project (MOP) is a unique UK–based writing project which has been running since 1981. ... [it] differs from other similar social investigations because of its historical link to the original Mass Observation and because of its focus is on voluntary, self–motivated participation. It revives the early Mass Observation notion that everyone can participate in creating their own history or social science. The Mass Observers do not constitute a statistically representative sample of the population but can be seen as reporters or 'citizen journalists' who provide a window on their worlds.

The material is solicited in response to 'directives' or open–ended questions sent to them by post or email three times a year. The directives contain two or three broad themes which cover both very personal issues and wider political and social issues and events.

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TAGS

1937198120th century21st century • Charles Madge • citizen journalismconfessioncultural heritagediagramdiary • directives • drawingseventseveryday lifehistorical archiveshistorical chronicles • Humphrey Jennings • letterslistlongitudinal studymapMass Observation Project (MOP)material culture • memoir • open-ended questionsopinion • ordinary people • personal experiencephotographsplacespolitical issuesposterity • press cutting • qualitative researchresearch resourcesself knowledge • self-identity • self-revelationsocial historysocial issuessocial researchstatistically representative samplestoriessubjectivitytheir storiesthematic patterns • Tom Harrisson • UK • University of Sussex • voluntary participationwriting project

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JULY 2013

Peter Norvig: The 100,000-student classroom

"In the fall of 2011 Peter Norvig taught a class with Sebastian Thrun on artificial intelligence at Stanford attended by 175 students in situ –– and over 100,000 via an interactive webcast. He shares what he learned about teaching to a global classroom."

(TED Talks)

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TAGS

14th century2011 • Andrew Ng • artificial intelligenceaudiencebar • Bayes networks • Benjamin BloomclassroomCoursera (provider) • Daphne Koller • disruptive education • due date • Eric Mazur • flipped classroomsflipping the classroomgame theoryglobal classroomin situ • interactive webcast • Khan Academy • MITx • motivationone-on-oneonline classesonline forumopen-ended questionspeer instruction • Peter Norvig • sage on the stageSebastian Thrun • Stanford Coursera • Stanford University • synchronous learning • Teach For America • teachingTED Talks • traditional education • Udacitywebcastwebcasting

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 FEBRUARY 2013

The Social Constructivist Worldview

"Social constructivism (often combined with interpretivism; see Mertens, 1998) is such a perspective, and it is typically seen as an approach to qualitative research. The ideas came from Mannheim and from works such as Berger and Luekmann's (1967) The Social Construction of Reality and Lincoln and Guba's (1985) Naturalistic Inquiry. More recent writers who have summarized this position are Lincoln and Guba (2000), Schwandt (2007), Neuman (2000), and Crotty (1998), among others. Social constructivists hold assumptions that individuals seek understanding of the world in which they live and work. Individuals develop subjective meanings of their experiences – meanings directed toward certain objects or things. These meanings are varied and multiple, leading the researcher to look for the complexity of views rather than narrowing meanings into a few categories or ideas. The goal of the research is to rely as much as possible on the participants' views of the situation being studied. The questions become broad and general so that the participants can construct the meaning of a situation, typically forged in discussions or interactions with other persons. The more open–ended the questioning, the better, as the researcher listens carefully to what people say or do in their life settings. Often these subjective meanings are negotiated socially and historically. They are not simply imprinted on individuals but are formed through interaction with others (hence social constructivism) and through historical and cultural norms that operate in individuals' lives. Thus, constructivist researchers often address the processes of interaction among individuals. They also focus on the specific contexts in which people live and work, in order to understand the historical and cultural settings of the participants. Researchers recognize that their own backgrounds shape their interpretation, and they position themselves in the research to acknowledge how their interpretation flows from their personal, cultural, and historical experiences. The researcher's intent is to make sense of (or interpret) the meanings others have about the world. Rather than starting with a theory (as in postpostivism), inquirers generate or inductively develop a theory or pattern of meaning."

(John Creswell, 2003)

John Creswell (2003). "Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches". (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publication.

TAGS

complexity of views • constructivist researcher • cultural experiences • Donna Mertens • Egon Guba • historical and cultural norms • historical and cultural settings • historical experiences • imprinted on individuals • interaction among individuals • interaction with othersinterpret meaningsinterpretationinterpretivismJohn CreswellKarl Mannheim • life contexts • life settings • Michael Crottyopen-ended questioningopen-ended questions • pattern of meaning • Peter Berger • postpostivism • qualitative researchsocial constructivismsocial science • subjective meanings • theory of meaning • Thomas Luckmann • Thomas Schwandt • William Neuman • work contextsYvonna Lincoln

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 APRIL 2011

Narrative techniques in medicine: tagging / indexing narratives

"There are a number of ways in which text–based narrative content can be synthesized and analyzed to generate more quantitatively oriented findings. Common approaches involve attaching descriptors like tags (keywords) or indexes (retrieving concepts) or extracting thematic patterns as 'codes' (commonalities). The content author or a researcher can manually code content by looking for recurring ideas or subjects, or use Internet tools to attach tags to narrative content. One system developed by 'Cognitive Edge' applies semi–structured tagging to narrative content to generate 'numerical data with rich context' (Snowden)."

(Eleanor Herriman, p.3–4)

Fig.1 James 's Public Gallery [https://picasaweb.google.com/ilmainstreetleaders] 'People broke up into small groups to share personal health care stories. Stephanie Arnet and her daughter, Satwant and Onkar Dhillon and Debbie Miller.'

2). Eleanor Herriman (2008). 'Narrative Techniques in Medicine: Translating Cognitive Sciences into Potent Informatics Instruments', Vol. 3 No. 1 April 2008 Medical Informatics Review, IC Sciences Corp.

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TAGS

analysisannotationclinical medicine • code content • codes • cognitive potency • cognitive profiling • commonalities • Dave Snowden • descriptors • evaluation instruments • evaluation methods • extracting thematic patterns • healthcare • indexes • indices • internet tools • keyword tags • keywords • medical informatics • medicine needs narrative • narrative • narrative as personal expression • narrative as story • narrative content • natural language processingnew technologies • NLP • numerical data with rich context • open-ended questionspersonal narrativesquantitatively oriented findingsrecurring ideas • recurring subjects • researcher • retrieving concepts • semi-structured tagging • storysynthesistaggingtags • text-based narrative content • thematic analysisthematic patterns

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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