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Which clippings match 'Flow' keyword pg.1 of 2
19 NOVEMBER 2013

Applying Heidegger's Philosophy to Design

"Heidegger's philosophy offers what is arguably the most thorough account of the process of human understanding available. Although his analysis of interpretation is useful if one is to understand activities like innovative design, it never addresses the realm of design directly. Heidegger discusses interpretation at a high level of generality and chooses his examples from interactions between people and physical artifacts, like the use of hammers by carpenters. He is concerned with the nature of understandingly being in the world. While a person's world includes conceptual and imaginative realms like design, Heidegger's examples primarily come from the world of physical artifacts which can be encountered perceptually. ...

Heidegger treats artifacts in the world the same way he would treat design artifacts on the drawing board. That is, he is not really concerned with them as physically present objects of perception. On the contrary, his main effort philosophically is to distinguish artifacts–in–use from traditional conceptions of physically–present–objects. For example, a hammer in use is not understood by the carpenter as an observed object with physical attributes, but is skillfully applied to the activities of the current situation. Furthermore, this skillful use takes place within the context of future–oriented plans and desires, such as the anticipation of the item that is under construction. This is similar to components of a design, which are skillfully arranged in terms of their relationships to other design components and within the context of the anticipated final design. Marks in a design sketch, for instance, are important for their roles within a network of significances, rather than for their physical properties as lines. Interpretation of both physical artifacts and designs is situated. ...

The notion of breakdown in action plays a rather small role in Heidegger's analysis of human understanding. Heidegger uses examples of breakdown in order to make explicit the network of references among artifacts that are only present tacitly under conditions of normal use. Yet, the notion of breakdown has been elevated to central importance in the theories that have tried to adopt Heidegger's analysis to a theory of design and to operationalize this theory for computer support. Thus, breakdown plays an important role in Schön (1985), Winograd & Flores (1986), Suchman (1987), Ehn (1988), Budde & Züllighoven (1990), McCall, Morch, & Fischer (1990), Dreyfus (1991), Coyne & Snodgrass (1991), Fischer & Nakakoji (1992).

The fact that so many writers influenced by Heidegger have focused on breakdown does not provide multiple independent support for this emphasis. ... most of these writers have been influenced by Heidegger only indirectly–either through Dreyfus or through Schön. If one looks closely at the discussions of breakdown in Dreyfus and Schön, one can note an ambiguity in whether they are speaking about a (ontological) breakdown in the network of references or a (practical) breakdown in action. Dreyfus is certainly aware of the ontological role of breakdown, but he is concerned to make his presentation acceptable to an American audience, trained in the rationalist tradition. For the sake of concreteness, he uses examples that stress the breakdown in action. Schön is also aware of the ontological ramifications, but he has couched his discussion in terms of action (e.g., knowing–in–action, reflection–in–action), so it often seems that his examples of breakdown exemplify breakdowns in action rather than breakdowns in situated understanding. Given that it is easier to operationalize breakdowns in action than breakdowns in situated understanding, it is not surprising that people interested in producing practical results from Dreyfus or Schön's theories would tend to emphasize the action–oriented reading of the ambiguous discussions."

(Gerry Stahl, 5 January 2004)

TAGS

action-oriented reading • Adrian Snodgrass • Anders Morch • anticipation • artefacts-in-use • being-in-the-worldbreakdown • breakdown in action • breakdown in the network of references • breakdowns in action • breakdowns in situated understanding • carpenter • conceptual domain • concreteness • current situationdesign artefactsdesign innovation • design sketch • design theoryDonald Schon • drawing board • Fernando Floresflow • Gerhard Fischer • Gerry Stahl • hammer • Heinz Zullighoven • Hubert Dreyfushuman perception • human understanding • innovative design • knowing-in-action • Kumiyo Nakakoji • Lucy Suchman • Martin Heidegger • nature of understanding • network of references • network of significances • normal use • objects of perception • Pelle Ehn • philosophy of design • physical artefacts • physical attributes • physical properties • physically present • physically-present-objects • rationalist tradition • Raymond McCall • reflection-in-action • Reinhard Budde • Richard Coynesituated construction of realitysituated knowledgessketching ideas • skillful use • Terry Winogradtheory of design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 AUGUST 2012

Kevin Kelly: screen culture is a world of constant flux

"Screen culture is a world of constant flux, of endless sound bites, quick cuts and half–baked ideas. It is a flow of gossip tidbits, news headlines and floating first impressions. Notions don't stand alone but are massively interlinked to everything else; truth is not delivered by authors and authorities but is assembled by the audience. Screen culture is fast, like a 30–sec. movie trailer, and as liquid and open–ended as a website. ...

On a screen, words move, meld into pictures, change color and perhaps even meaning. Sometimes there are no words at all, only pictures or diagrams or glyphs that may be deciphered into multiple meanings. This is terribly unnerving to any civilization based on text logic."

(Kevin Kelly, 19 June 2000, "Will We Still Turn Pages", Time Magazine)

Fig.1 JasKaitlin "hypermediacy" taken on April 25, 2010 using an Apple iPhone 3GS [http://www.flickr.com/photos/64776338@N07/5996281055/].

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TAGS

200021st centuryaudienceauthorised voiceauthorityauthorshipbook • classic logic of books • cohesive narratives • constant flux • credibility • cultural change • double screening • dual screening • endlessly tweakable • fast action • first impressions • flowfragmentaryfragmentation • framing narrative • gossiphalf-baked ideashypermediacyinformation in contextinterconnectedness • interlinked • Kevin Kellyliquid • meanings change • multi-tabbing • multiple meanings • narrative framingnon-linearopen-ended • people of the book • people of the screen • quick cutsreflexive modernityscreen culturesensemakingsound bitesynthesise knowledge • text logic • tidbitsTime Magazine • traditional narratives • turning pages • various contexts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 FEBRUARY 2012

Overcoding, Coding, and Recoding

"...The social axiomatic of modern societies is caught between two poles and is constantly oscillating from one pole to the other. Born of decoding and deterritorialization, on the ruins of the despotic machine, these societies are caught between the Urstaat that they would like to resuscitate as an overcoding and reterritorializing unity, and the unfettered flows that carry them toward an absolute threshold. They recode with all their might, with world–wide dictatorship, local dictators, and an all–powerful police, while decoding – or allowing the decoding of – the fluent quantities of their capital and their populations. They are torn in two directions: archaism and futurism, neoarchaism and ex–futurism, paranoia and schizophrenia. They vacillate between two poles: the paranoiac despotic sign, the sign–signifier of the despot that they try to revive as a unit of code; and the sign–figure of the schizo as a unit of decoded flux, a schiz, a point–sign or flow–break. They try to hold on to the one, but they pour or flow out through the otaxher. They are continually behind or ahead of themselves."

(Deleuze and Guattari 1983, 260)

TAGS

a point-sign • a schiz • all-powerful • archaism • capital • continually ahead of themselves • continually behind themselves • cultural code • decoded flux • decoding • despot • despotic • despotic machine • deterritorialisation • dictatorship • ex-futurism • Felix Guattariflow • flow-break • flows • fluent quantities • FuturismGilles Deleuzeglobal capital flows • local dictators • neoarchaism • oscillating • overcodingparanoia • paranoiac • pole to pole • police • populations • pour • Recode • resuscitate • reterritorialising unity • schizo • schizophrenia • sign-figure • sign-signifier • social axiomatic of modern societies • societies • threshold • torn in two directions • unfettered flows • Urstaat • vacillate between two poles • world-wide dictatorship

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 APRIL 2011

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi: creativity, fulfillment and flow

"Mihaly Czikszentmihalyi asks, 'What makes a life worth living?' Noting that money cannot make us happy, he looks to those who find pleasure and lasting satisfaction in activities that bring about a state of 'flow'."

(TEDTalks)

Fig.1 recorded February 2004 in Monterey, California. Duration: 18:55

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TAGS

2004anxietyapathyarousalautonomy • autotelic • autotelic personality • boredomcontrolcreativityempowerment • finding pleasure • flow • fulfillment • happiness • lasting satisfaction • Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi • money cannot make us happy • motivationpersonal challengespleasurepsychology • relaxation • satisfaction • state of flow • TED Talks • what makes a life worth living • worry

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JULY 2009

Exploring our transient relationship with the built environment

"Interval II explores our transient relationship with our built environment through symbolic periods in history. Chan juxtaposes two contrasting types of architecture that mediate our relationship with our surroundings from a cast–iron pier in Northwest England to a roundhouse in Southwest China. Chan uses time–lapse to accentuate the transitory movement of light over the structures, highlighting their physical form within the altered landscape. Shifting from micro to macro, she investigates traces of human presence within the buildings, as well as the social and cultural shifts within the respective societies."

Fig. Interval 2, high definition film, 19 mins, film still (2007)

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TAGS

2007algorithmic artalgorithmic randomness • altered landscape • birdsblack and whitebuilt environment • cast iron • flock of starlings • flocking • flocking birds • flow • human presence • Interval 2 (2007) • juxtapositionmeditation • murmuration • Northwest England • observational seriesPeoples Republic of Chinapier • roundhouse • Saatchi Artslowed motion • Southwest China • starlings • Suki Chan • surroundingsswarm behaviour • time interval • timelapsetimelessnesstracestransience • transient relationship • transitory movementurban spacesvideo installation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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