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25 NOVEMBER 2014

The Notebook: A Place for Thinking

Filmed at Irish Museum of Modern Art, Ireland. "Notebook Material" Des Ward Student artwork in notebooks – 1st year groups on the IADT BA Art programme: 2009 – 2014.

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TAGS

2014 • a place for thinking • art and design practiceattunementbookcommonplace bookcommonplaces • Des Ward • discernment • drawingdrawing as enquirydrawing ideasdrawing on paperdrawing studiesDun Laoghaire Institute of Art • experimental speculation • experimental thinkingfirst year art and design • IADT BA Art • idea generationideas start on paper • Irish Museum of Modern Art • making processmark makingnotebook • physical experimentation • place metaphor • poetics of creative research • poetics of thinking • poetics of thought • Republic of Ireland • Seamus Heaney • sketch-thinkingsketchbooksketching ideas • skilled practice • thinking places • thinking processthinking through drawingthinking toolstracesvisual problem-solving

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 AUGUST 2013

Thinking aloud: a method for systematically collecting and analysing data about the design process

"Suppose that you want to understand the design process of architects, the knowledge that they use, the cognitive actions that they take and the strategies they employ. How would you go about this? One obvious possibility is to ask some architects how they design a building. Interestingly enough, they will not find this an easy question to answer. They are used to do their job, not to explain it. If they do try to tell you how they go about their design work, it is quite possible that their account of it will be incomplete or even incorrect, because they construct this account from memory. They may be inclined to describe the design process neatly in terms of the formal design methods that they acquired during their professional training, whereas the real design process deviates from these methods. Psychologists have demonstrated that such accounts are not very reliable. Another possibility is to look at the architects' designs and at their intermediate sketches. However, now you are looking at the products of the thought processes of these architects, and not at the thought processes themselves. What is needed are more direct data on the ongoing thinking processes during working on a design. If you want to know how they arrive at their designs, what they think, what is difficult for them and what is easy, how they reconcile conflicting demands, a different research method is needed.

A good method in this situation is to ask architects to work on a design and to instruct them to think aloud. What they say is recorded and used as data for analysis of the design process. This is a very direct method to gain insight in the knowledge and methods of human problem–solving. The speech and writings are called spoken and written protocols. In this book we will describe a method for systematically collecting and analysing such think aloud protocols. This method can be used by psychologists and other social scientists who want to know more about cognitive processes. It is also an important method for knowledge engineers whose goal is to build a knowledgebased computer system on the basis of human expertise."

(Maarten W. van Someren, Yvonne F. Barnard, et al., 1994, pp.1–2)

Maarten W. van Someren, Yvonne F. Barnard and Jacobijn A.C. Sandberg. (1994). "The Think Aloud Method: A Practical Guide to Modelling Cognitive Processes".

TAGS

academic researchanalysing dataarchitectural thoughtcognitive actionscognitive processescognitive psychologycognitive sciencecognitive theoriesconceptual modeldata collection and analysisdata collection techniquesdesign knowledgedesign process • design strategies • design workdirect observationexperimental knowledgeformal design methods • human expertise • knowledge engineer • knowledge-based systems • problem-solvingpsychological analysispsychological modelsresearch methodsketching ideas • social scientists • spoken protocols • task analysis • testing theories • theoretical model • think aloud (research method) • think aloud protocols • thinking processthought process • unreliable evidence • user testinguser-based evaluation • written protocols

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 APRIL 2011

Visual Directions: reflective writing (and the design process)

"Reflection is an ongoing process of thinking about your development in relation to your work. Reflective writing is both a record (description) and a review (analysis and evaluation) of your work. Reflective practice is a 'sorting out/clarifying process' (Moon 2004) giving you new perspectives on yourself and your work."

(University of the Arts London)

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TAGS

analysis and evaluation • artistic practiceblogging • Centre for Learning and Teaching in Art and Design • Centres for Excellence in Teaching and LearningCETL • clarifying process • CLTAD • conceptualisation • Creative Learning in Practice • Creative Learning in Practice (CLIP) • creative practicecreative work • descriptive • design educationdesign processe-learningelearning • Jenny Moon • learning journalonline journalspedagogyreflectionreflectivereflective journalreflective practicereflective writingreviewsketchbook • sorting out • theory buildingthinking processUniversity of the Arts London (UAL)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 JULY 2006

Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats

"Six Thinking Hats is a simple, effective parallel thinking process that helps people be more productive, focused, and mindfully involved. And once learned, the tools can be applied immediately!

You and your team members can learn how to separate thinking into six clear functions and roles. Each thinking role is identified with a colored symbolic 'thinking hat.' By mentally wearing and switching 'hats,' you can easily focus or redirect thoughts, the conversation, or the meeting.

The White Hat calls for information known or needed. 'The facts, just the facts.' :: The Yellow Hat symbolizes brightness and optimism. Under this hat you explore the positives and probe for value and benefit. :: The Black Hat is judgment – the devil's advocate or why something may not work. Spot the difficulties and dangers :: where things might go wrong. Probably the most powerful and useful of the Hats but a problem if overused. :: The Red Hat signifies feelings, hunches and intuition. When using this hat you can express emotions and feelings and share fears, likes, dislikes, loves, and hates. :: The Green Hat focuses on creativity :: the possibilities, alternatives, and new ideas. It's an opportunity to express new concepts and new perceptions. :: The Blue Hat is used to manage the thinking process. It's the control mechanism that ensures the Six Thinking Hats guidelines are observed."

(The de Bono Group)

Edward De Bono (1985). "Six Thinking Hats", ISBN 0–316–17831–4.

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TAGS

ability to focusabstract representationabstract representationsabstraction • abstraction in problem solving and learning • abstractions for problem solving • alternatives • blackbluecolour • control mechanism • creativitydecision makingdesign methoddesign methodsdesign team • difficulties and dangers • distinct functions • distinct roles • Edward de Bonofactsfeelings • focus thoughts • green • group discussion • hat • hats • high performance thinkinghunches • individual thinking • intuitionjudgmentmethods for design practice • mindfully involved • new ideas • parallel thinking • parallel thinking process • possibilities • problem abstractionproblem-solvingproductivityred • redirect thoughts • role playingseparate thinkingSix Thinking Hatssymbolism • the facts • thinking • thinking hat • thinking process • thinking role • thinking tooltooltools for thinkingvalue and benefitways of thinking • wearing • whiteyellow

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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