Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Ukraine' keyword pg.1 of 2
21 DECEMBER 2015

Adam Curtis: our defeatist response to contradictory narratives

"So much of the news this year [2014] has been hopeless, depressing and above all confusing. To which the only response is 'Oh Dear' But what this film is going to suggest is that defeatist response has become a central part of a new system of political control and to understand how this is happening you have to look to Russia and to a man called Vladislav Surkov who is a hero of our time. Surkov is one of President Putin's advisors and has helped him maintain his power for fifteen years, but he has done it in a very new way. He came originally from the avant-garde art world and those who have studied his career say that what Surkov has done is import ideas from conceptual art into the very heart of politics."

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2014Adam CurtisAfghanistanapathyausterity measuresavant-garde art • Bashar al-Assad • bewildering • British troops • Chancellor of the Exchequer • Charlie Brooker • conceptual artconfusion tacticsconspiracy theoriesconstant changecontradictory narratives • contradictory vaudeville • controlcrimedaesh • defeatism • defeatist response • destabilised perceptiondisc jockey • ebola • economy • evil enemy • financial crimes • George Osbornehuman agencyhyperrealityincoherencemedia machine • non-linear war • non-linear world • perceptions of realitypolitical control • political strategy • post-traditional societypublic thought • quantitative easing • Russia • Russian politics • ruthless elite • shapeshiftingsimulacrasmokescreen • strategy of power • Syria • those in power • Ukraineuncertainty • undermine perceptions • Vladimir PutinVladislav Surkovwhat is really happening

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 MARCH 2015

Universal Design‬: The World Comfortable for All

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design experience • design of human-made objects • design principles • designing for different ability • designing for disability • disability discriminationform and functionHCIhuman-computer interaction design • learnability • mainstream policies • mainstream services • measuring usability • mechanical objects • people with disabilities • perceived efficiency • perceived elegance • physical interaction • policies and services • product design • rights of persons with disabilities • shaping our relationship to the material worldtangible interfacesUkraine • United Nations Childrens Fund • United Nations Development Programme • United Nations in Ukraine • universal designusability • usability studies • usability study • usefulnessuser experience • user satisfaction • utilitarian value

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JANUARY 2015

Soundweaving: playing traditional Hungarian folk embroidery

"At the core of the Soundweaving project is the traditional cross–stitching pattern used in Hungarian folk embroidery transformed into sound by a punch card comb music player. The cross–stitch pattern of holes on the tape in the musical box were punched by the creator, Zsanett Szirmay.

In this case, the punched tape acts as the score. Embroidered shirts and pillows from the Transylvanian Bukovina, and from Kalotaszeg and Hungary served as a basis for the patterns. As part of the transformation, embroidery patterns turned into laser cut textile pieces, and cross–stitched patterns into melodies. Soundweaving equally stimulates all senses, and calls for interaction. The project uses multiple media and communicates on diverse planes, combining the borderlands of folk art, design and music. It belongs to the analogue and digital realms at the same time as the handmade embroidery is translated into laser cut patterns. At the same time, the visual world is presented in audio, or rather the graphic aspect of music gets a role in developing the tunes. Bálint Tárkány–Kovács, folk musician and composer was instrumental in the audio mapping and developing the tunes."

(Rita Mária Halasi, Moholy–Nagy Művészeti Egyetem, 2014)

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2014analogue correspondence • Balint Tarkany-Kovacs • Bucovina • Carpathians • computational aesthetics • cross-stitch pattern • design and music • design student projectembroidered patternsembroidered textiles • embroidery pattern • folk decoration • handicraft • handmade embroidery • Hungarian folk embroidery • Hungary • Kalotaszeg • laser cut patterns • laser cut textile pieces • listening to imagesMA Textile Design • melodies • Moholy-Nagy Muveszeti Egyetem • music boxmusic player • musical box • musical scoreprogrammable device • punch card comb • punch cardspunched-card systemsequencer • Soundweaving project • traditional crafts • traditional handicrafts • Transylvania • Transylvanian Bukovina • Ukrainevisual pattern • weaving pattern • Zsanett Szirmay

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 NOVEMBER 2014

Videographer uses drone to capture footage of Pripyat, Chernobyl

"Some tragedies never end. Ask people to name a nuclear disaster and most will probably point to Fukushima in Japan three years ago. The nuclear meltdown at Chernobyl in Ukraine was 30 years ago, but the crisis is still with us today. That's because radiation virtually never dies. After the explosion in 1986, the Soviets built a primitive sarcophagus, a tomb to cover the stricken reactor. But it wasn't meant to last very long and it hasn't. Engineers say there is still enough radioactive material in there to cause widespread contamination. For the last five years a massive project has been underway to seal the reactor permanently. But the undertaking is three quarters of a billion dollars short and the completion date has been delayed repeatedly. Thirty years later, Chernobyl's crippled reactor still has the power to kill."

(Bob Simon, 23 November 2014, CBS News)

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19862014 • 60 Minutes • abandoned places in Eastern Europebarren land • Bob Simon • building and ruinsCanon 7DCBS NewsChernobylcontaminationdangerous placesDanny Cookedeserted places • desolate • desolate space • devastated place • devastation • DJI Phantom 2 • droneFukushima • ghost town • GoPro • Hannah Miller • liminal space • neglected land • no mans landnon-placenuclear disaster • nuclear meltdown • nuclear reactor • overgrown • physical destructionplaceless placeplacelessnesspreservationPripyatquadcopterradiation • radioactive material • ruin • ruinssarcophagustime capsuletombUkraine • urban desert • videographer • wasteland

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 SEPTEMBER 2014

Bulgarians repeatedly vandalise Soviet monuments in protest

"The Russian Embassy in Bulgaria has issued a note demanding that its former Soviet–era ally clean up the monument in Sofia's Lozenets district, identify and punish those responsible, and take 'exhaustive measures' to prevent similar attacks in the future, the news agency reported Monday.

The monument was spray–painted on the eve of the Bulgarian Socialist Party's celebration of its 123rd anniversary, the Sofia–based Novinite news agency reported.

The vandalism was the latest in a series of similar recent incidents in Bulgaria – each drawing angry criticism from Moscow.

Early this year, unknown artists painted another monument to Soviet troops in Sofia in the colors of the Ukrainian flag.

In August last year, a Soviet army monument in Sofia was painted pink in an 'artistic apology' for Bulgaria's support of Soviet troops who suppressed Czechoslovakia's Prague Spring revolt against Moscow–based communist rulers."

(Anna Dolgov, 19 August 2014, The Moscow Times)

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2013anniversaryappropriationBulgaria • Bulgarian Socialist Party • critical commentarycriticismcritiquecultural critiquecultural insensitivityculture jammingCzechoslovakiadisrespectgraffiti art • Lozenets • monumentpolitical art • political criticism • political protestPrague Springprotest artprotest worksPussy Riotre-purposeRed Armyreimaginedreinscribe • reinscription • revision • revolt • Robin (Batman) • Ronald McDonald • Russian embassy • Santa Claus • Sofia (Bulgaria) • Soviet armySoviet eraSoviet monuments • Soviet troops • Soviet Unionspray paintingstreet artsupermanUkraine • Ukrainian flag • unknown artist • vandalism

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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