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Which clippings match 'Fragility' keyword pg.1 of 1
02 NOVEMBER 2015

Hakanaï dance performance 2013

"Hakanaï is a solo choreographic performance that unfolds through a series of images in motion. In Japanese Hakanaï denotes that which is temporary and fragile, evanescent and transient, and in this case something set between dreams and reality. While widely associated with nature, the term is now often used to elicit an intangible aspect of the human condition and its precariousness. It encompasses two elements: that concerning the human being as well as that related to dreams. This symbolic relationship is the foundation of the dance composition in which a dancer gives life to a space somewhere between the borders of imagination and reality, through her interactions with the images she encounters. The images are on-stage animations that move in physical patterns according to the rhythm of the live sounds that they follow. The performance's outcome is the revelation of a digital installation to its audience."

Fig.1 Composed and Directed by Adrien Mondot & Claire Bardainne; Dance (alternating) Akiko Kajihara, Satchie Noro, Virginie Barjonet, Francesca Ziviani; Digital Interpretation (alternating); Adrien Mondot, Claire Bardainne, Jérémy Chartier, Loïs Drouglazet; Sound Design; Christophe Sartori, Loïs Drouglazet, Pierre Xucla; Sound Interpretation Christophe Sartori, Loïs Drouglazet, Jérémy Chartier, Pierre Xucla; Set Design Martin Gautron, Vincent Perreux; Digital Toolset Loïs Drouglazet; Light Design Jérémy Chartier; Outside Viewer Charlotte Farcet; Costume Design Johanna Elaouf; Technical Director Alexis Bergeron; Administrator Marek Vuiton; Booking Charlotte Auché; Production assistant Margaux Létang; Produced by; Adrien M / Claire B; Co-productions, Funding & Support; Les Subsistances, Lyon / Centre Pompidou-Metz; La Ferme du Buisson, Scène nationale de Marne-la-Vallée, Noisiel / Hexagone Scène Nationale Arts Sciences – Meylan / Les Champs Libres, Rennes / Centre des Arts, Enghien-les-Bains / Maison de la Culture de Nevers et de la Nièvre / City of Lille / DICRéAM; The Adrien M / Claire B Company is accredited by DRAC Rhône-Alpes, Rhône-Alpes Region and is supported by the City of Lyon.

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2013 • Adrien Mondot • Akiko Kajihara • Alexis Bergeron • algorithmic composition • algorithmic pattern • art and technology • artistic duo • between dream and reality • black and white • Charlotte Farcet • choreographic performance • Christophe Sartori • Claire Bardainne • computational artscube • dance composition • dance performancedesign formalism • digital backdrop • digital interpretation • digital puppetry • evanescence • fragilityFrancesca Zivianigenerative designgeometric pattern • Hakanai (2013) • immersive worksinteractive installation • Jeremy Chartier • Johanna Elaouf • light projection • Lois Drouglazet • Margaux Letang • Martin Gautron • movement performance • performance installation • Pierre Xucla • projection mappingpuppetryrhythm • Satchie Noro • sensors • snowflake • solo choreographic performance • solo performance • spider web • symbolic relationship • synapsetemporarytransiencetransitory movementtranslucence • translucent veils • Vincent Perreux • Virginie Barjonet • visual journey

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 NOVEMBER 2012

Su Blackwell: paper craft dioramas of childhood wonder and anxiety

"I often work within the realm of fairy–tales and folk–lore. I began making a series of book–sculpture, cutting–out images from old books to create three–dimensional diorama's, and displaying them inside wooden boxes. ...

For the cut–out illustrations, I tend to lean towards young–girl characters, placing them in haunting, fragile settings, expressing the vulnerability of childhood, while also conveying a sense of childhood anxiety and wonder. There is a quiet melancholy in the work, depicted in the material used, and choice of subtle colour."

(Su Blackwell)

Fig.1 Su Blackwell (2008). "The Girl in the Wood" [http://www.sublackwell.co.uk/portfolio–book–cut–sculpture/]

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2011book sculpturebookschildhood • childhood anxiety • childhood wonder • cut-outcut-out illustrationdesign craftdioramafairy talesfolklorefragilityhaunting imagesillustrated bookpaper dioramapapercraft • quiet melancholy • Su Blackwell • subtle colour • vulnerabilityvulnerability of childhood • wooden box • young girl

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 FEBRUARY 2012

Joyce Campbell's Garden of Ambrotype Peculiarities

"L.A. Botanical is, specifically, a series of ambrotypes, an early form of photography, invented in 1850, the same year that the City of Los Angeles was incorporated as a municipality. At the time, the population comprised a mere 1,610 hardy souls. The population explosion of the following 150 years into the Los Angeles we know today resembles (from an imaginary aerial vantage point) an algal bloom, or bacterial inflorescence[ii]–the visible record of a natural imbalance

Ambrotypes are negative images on glass plates which, when shown against a black backdrop, appear to be positive. The name comes from the Greek ambrotos, 'immortal', a rather poetic way of evoking the power of photography to fix forever the fragile moment. Plants, particularly flowers, have long been the favorite metaphor of poets, painters, and now photographers for the passage of time–they are our most consistent reminder of mortality, and yet our most frequent solace at times of bereavement.

Though the ambrotype predates early moving pictures, Campbell's use of antique photography can't help but remind viewers of its sister medium, film, and the attendant connection with Los Angeles as a national and global 'dream factory' (or, indeed, that these technologies played their part in swelling the population of the fledgling city). Campbell's humble backyard blooms become, in L.A. Botanical, stars. The silver nitrate of the photographic process is linked, chemically and etymologically, to the silver screens onto which early films were projected. Campbell's botanical 'immortals' have been bequeathed eternal 'limelight' (another chemical process which, due to its use in theatrical lighting, is forever associated with fame)."

(Tessa Laird, 2006–2007)

Fig.1 "Black Walnut, Antifungal, anti–parasitic, antiseptic, herbicide and hair dye. To treat thrush, candida, ringworm and internal parasites. Ellagic acid and Juglone are being investigated as cancer treatments."

Fig.2 "Turpentine, From Ponderosa Pine, Paint thinner, solvent, liniment, antiseptic and treatment for lice and tapeworm."

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1850 • ambrotype • antique photography • Aotearoa New ZealandartistAucklandblackbotanical • chemical process • City of Los Angeles • creative practice • fix forever • flowers • fragile moment • fragility • glass plate • immortal • Joyce Campbell • L.A. Botanical • Los Angelesmetaphormomentmoving pictures • negatives • New Zealand artistpassage of timephotographer • photographic process • photographyplantplant information • silver nitrate • specimenstasisstill life photography • visible record • visual spectaclewoman photographer

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 APRIL 2011

Fantastic Planet: political allegory of human regression and rebirth

"A winner of the Cannes Film Festival 1973, 'Fantastic Planet' is a full length animated fantasy set on the planet of the Draags in a far–off solar system where humans are kept as pets by a race of huge blue creatures."

(Alice in Videoland)

Fig.1–8 René Laloux and Roland Topor (1973). 'Fantastic Planet/La Planète Sauvage'. France: 72 mins.

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1973alienalien raceallegoryanimationattackbluebraceletCannes Film FestivalchildrencollarcommunicationCzechoslovakiadomesticated • Draags • drawingexodusextermination • Fantastic Planet • fantasyfilm • fragile • fragilityFrancefuturehumanhumanoidimaginary worlds • Jiri Trnka Studio • knowledge • La Planete Sauvage • lethal • master and slave • meditationnew technology • Oms • Oms en serie • peacepetplanetpolitical allegorypost-apocalyptic scenariorebirthregression • Rene Laloux • reversal of fortune • Roland Topor • savage • scalescience fictionsocietyspeculative fictionspiritsstatue • Stefan Wul • stop framesymbolism • Terr • Tiva • tribevisual design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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