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Which clippings match 'Harmonic' keyword pg.1 of 1
05 DECEMBER 2013

How calculus is changing architecture

"So, working with Bentley and MicroStation, we've written a custom piece of software that networks all of the components together into these chunks of information, so that if we change any element along the length of the building, not only does that change distribute through each one of the trusses, but each one of the trusses then distributes that information down the length of the entire facade of the building. So it's a single calculation for every single component of the building that we're adding onto. So, it's tens of millions of calculations just to design one connection between a piece of structural steel and another piece of structural steel. But what it gives us is a harmonic and synthesized relationship of all these components, one to another.

This idea has, kind of, brought me into doing some product design, and it's because design firms that have connections to architects, like, I'm working with Vitra, which is a furniture company, and Alessi, which is a houseware company. They saw this actually solving a problem: this ability to differentiate components but keep them synthetic. So, not to pick on BMW, or to celebrate them, but take BMW as an example. They have to, in 2005, have a distinct identity for all their models of cars. So, the 300 series, or whatever their newest car is, the 100 series that's coming out, has to look like the 700 series, at the other end of their product line, so they need a distinct, coherent identity, which is BMW. At the same time, there's a person paying 30,000 dollars for a 300–series car, and a person paying 70,000 dollars for a 700 series, and that person paying more than double doesn't want their car to look too much like the bottom–of–the–market car. So they have to also discriminate between these products. So, as manufacturing starts to allow more design options, this problem gets exacerbated, of the whole and the parts."

(Greg Lynn, February 2005)

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TAGS

2005abnormalityalgorithmalgorithmic architecture • Antonio Gaudi • architecture • beautiful architecture • beauty • Bentley Motors • BMW • bridge • bubble diagram • buildingcalculation • calculus • Chris Williams • Christopher Wren • computational aestheticscontinuous series • curvature • custom software • dais • digital fabricationdigital toolsdimensions • Frei Otto • furniture • generic form • genetic evolutiongothic • Greg Bateson • Greg Lynn • harmonic • houseware • human-scale understandingideal form • intricacies of scale • Mannheim Concert Hall • manufacturingmathematics • MicroStation • model of beauty • model of nature • modular architecture • monstrosity • mutation • natural form • Norman Foster • parabola • part-whole thinking • physiological development • product designproduct differentiationproportions • Robert Maillart • structural abstractionstructural forcesstructural formstructuresymmetrysynthesised relationship • teratology • vertebrae • Vitra • vocabulary of form • William Bateson

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 NOVEMBER 2013

Thelonious Monk: Straight, No Chaser (1988)

"Expanding on footage of Monk's 1967 tour shot by Christian Blackwood, Charlotte Zwering (Gimme Shelter) has created the definitive filmic portrait of the master bop pianist–composer. This captivating DVD digs deeper into the life of the famously eccentric pianist–composer ...

Straight, No Chaser fleshes out Monk's character considerably – from his harmonic theories to his use of quarter – tones (produced by hitting two adjacent piano keys simultaneously and occasionally even striking the boards with his entire forearm or his foot) to his mysterious relationship with his patron, baroness Nica de Koenigswarter."

(Vlatko, TopDocumentaryFilms.com)

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TAGS

16mm19671988archive footageavailable light • Barry Harris • bebop • Ben Riley • black and white • Bob Jones • Bruce Ricker • Charlie Rouse • Charlotte Zwerin • Charlotte Zwering • Christian Blackwood • cinema of the streetClint Eastwood • Dick Hyman • direct cinemadissonancedocumentarydocumentary filmeccentricfilm lighting • filmic portrait • Frank Paccione • harmonic • Harry Colomby • improvised methodinfluential creators • jazz great • jazz masterjazz performancejazz pianist • Jimmy Cleveland • John Coltrane • Johnny Griffin • Juilliard School • Larry Gales • live performancelow light • Malpaso Productions • music documentary • music tour • musical genius • Nellie Monk • Nica De Koenigswarter • offbeat • Phil Woods • pianist-composer • pianoportrait • posthumous interview • Ray Copeland • recording sessionrecording studiorehearsal • Samuel Wright • sixties coolsocial realism • Straight No Chaser (1988) • Teo Macero • Thelonious Monk • Tommy Flanagan • Warner Bros

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 APRIL 2005

Telephony: Mobile Telephone Cacophony

"Telephony allows gallery visitors to dial into a wall based grid of 42 Siemens mobile telephones, which in turn begin to call each other and create a piece of 'music.' Each phone has been individually programmed with a different ringtone, which played en–masse, create various harmonic layers all of which are based in some way on the popular and prevalent, NokiaTune. The more people who dial into the work (whether inside or beyond the gallery walls) the more complex and layered the audio becomes."

(Thomson & Craighead)

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TAGS

cacophonyharmonicmobilemusic • NokiaTune • Siemens • telephone • telephony • Thomson and Craighead
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