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10 APRIL 2012

VADS Fine Art Project Digital Capture Pilot Study: Case Study for the pragmatic direct digital capture of artworks from the Surrey Institute of Art and Design

"The VADS Fine Art Project aims to bring together, through a distributed digitisation model, artworks from across Higher Education Institutes (HEIs) that can serve to exemplify the history and achievement of fine art education and practice in this country since its inception in the 1850s.

In the initial stages of the project, a survey was sent out to all the Higher Education Institutions in the UK that taught fine art, in order to elicit whether or not student and staff work had been kept or documented. From this survey it was found that many colleges failed or had ceased to collect artworks due to the cost implications of purchasing, storing and insuring the works, leading to the output of many art colleges remaining undocumented.

As the Fine Art Project progressed, protocols for the digital capture, documentation and copyright clearance of work were established. These were then used to collect works from around the country to be included in the National Fine Art Education Digital Collection. However, given their inherent useable and easily applicable nature, it was thought the same protocols could be just as useful to digitally capture, document and rights–clear works within HEIs as and when they were being produced. This would make it far easier and affordable for colleges to capture and maintain collections of their present and past work, as well as offering additional benefits such as making them widely available on the Internet or for other publishing requirements."

(Ed Bremner, 1 September 2003 [last modified: 28th March 2006], Institute for Learning and Research Technology)

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TAGS

1850s2003AHDS Visual Artsartworkartworks • capture and maintain collections • case study • collect works • collecting artworks • collectioncopyright clearance • cost implications • digital capture • digitally capture • digitisation • direct digital capture • distributed digitisation model • documentation • documented • fine art • fine art education • fine art practice • Fine Art Project • HEI • Higher Education Institutes • higher education institutions • history and achievement • image management system • insuring artworks • Internetknowledge management • National Fine Art Education Digital Collection • pilot project • pilot study • present and past work • protocol • publishing requirements • purchasing artworks • raw filerepository • SIAD • storing artworks • student and staff work • Surrey Institute of Art and Design • surveyUKVADS • VADS Fine Art Project • VADS Fine Art Project Digital Capture Pilot Study

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 AUGUST 2011

Dickens Journals Online: The Online Text Correction project

"This project is called Dickens Journals Online (DJO). Its aim is to digitise and make freely available, as an educational and literary resource of unusually broad appeal, the two weekly magazines edited by Charles Dickens throughout the 1850s and 1860s. They are a treasure trove of good writing by over 300 authors; Dickens himself published A Tale of Two Cities, Hard Times and Great Expectations in their pages, as well as over 200 articles. ...

The OTC project began in earnest in January 2011, and for the first time we have given limited public access to DJO. We need to correct about 30,000 journal pages, not including the Household Narrative."

(Dickens Journals Online)

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TAGS

1850s1860s2011 • A Tale of Two Cities • articlesauthors • Charles Dickens • conservationcrowdsourcingDickens Journals Onlinedigital heritagedigitisation • digitise • DJO • educational resource • Great Expectations • Hard Times • Household Words • literary resource • literaturemagazineold media • Online Text Correction • OTC • participationVictorianwriting

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 APRIL 2011

The History of Instant Runoff Voting ('Alternative Vote' in Australia)

"The key the to the development of instant runoff voting (IRV) was the invention of the single transferable vote (STV) in the 1850's by Thomas Hare in England and Carl Andrae in Denmark. The essence of STV is the concept that a citizen would have one vote in a particular contest, but that that vote might be transferred from one candidate to another according to each voter's ranking of candidates, depending on the aggregate result of other voters' ballots. Hare devised this balloting and counting procedure in creating a system of proportional representation.

IRV, however, is not a system of proportional representation. Instead, IRV uses the STV innovation in a winner–take–all context. Instant runoff voting, using a preference ballot, was invented by an American, W. R. Ware, a Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, around 1870. The first known use of IRV in a governmental election was in 1893 in Queensland, Australia. However, this was a modified version of IRV in which all candidates except the top two were eliminated in a batch rather than sequentially, as in the pure form of IRV. The 'staggered runoff' concept that we understand today as IRV was first used in Western Australia in 1908.

IRV, called 'alternative vote' in Australia, came to be used in most Australian legislative elections, although it was superseded by Hare's STV system of proportional representation for the federal Senate. IRV is still used for electing members of the lower house. IRV is also used in other nations, such as Ireland. In the United Kingdom, the Jenkins Commission, appointed by the new government, released their report October 29 that recommends the use of IRV for electing the House of Commons (with proportional representation achieved through the election of additional members based on the popular vote for parties nationally). ...

The single transferable vote is a more common voting procedure in the U.S. than most of us realize. Even the Academy Awards uses STV in determining their finalists. The American Political Science Association (APSA), the organization of political science professors, uses IRV to elect their national president, since political scientists understand that IRV is the fairest and simplest way to elect a single winner from a field of candidates."

(Center for Voting and Democracy, Washington, D.C.)

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TAGS

1850s1893advocacyAlternative Vote • American Political Science Association • APSA • Australia • Australian Federal Senate • Australian Lower House • Carl Andrae • contest • counting procedure • Denmark • election • fairnessHouse of CommonsInstant Runoff VotingIRV • Jenkins Commission • legislative elections • Massachusetts Institute of TechnologymisrepresentationParliamentpolicypolitical representationpolitical sciencepoliticspopular vote • preference ballot • proportional representation • QueenslandrankingRepublic of Irelandsimplicity • Single Transferable Vote • single winner • STV • systemThomas HaretransferUKvotingvoting system • W. R. Ware

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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