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Which clippings match 'New Technology' keyword pg.1 of 3

How to deal with the demands of the rapidly evolving new technology and yet further the aesthetics of our filmic art?

"With digital capture and even digital intermediates, it becomes very easy to think of the image in the simplest of terms: contrast, saturation and color bias. But I think too often we forget about texture and sharpness. Film has organic grain texture that simply doesn't exist in digital cinematography. I'm not a film 'purist' but I think it's safe to say that with the advent of radical advances in digital cinema technology there has been a certain homogenization of the cinematographic image in regard to look and texture. It is common to shoot for an evenly distributed rich digital negative (protect the highlights, see into the shadows) with plenty of sharpness to endure the color correction suite and create the look in post. Everybody shoots the sensor the same way.

Painting is a great influence on me. Whenever I can I go to museums and look at the classics, the Dutch masters, Rembrandt and Georges de la Tour. Looking at these old paintings can be inspiring. These are the basics for cameramen because we can learn lighting from them. We can study the classic paintings and try to use that technique of lighting in our photography. I have lots of picture books at home–photography books and art books. When we did McCabe and Mrs. Miller, I showed a book of Andrew Wyeth's paintings to Bob Altman and said, 'What do you think of these faded, soft, pastel images?' And he liked it. Then I took the same book to the lab and explained to them that this was what we were aiming for. They understood right away why we were flashing the film. So it helps; a picture is worth ten thousand words. A picture can immediately tell you your feelings about something.

With digital capture, we have been given a completely different set of tools, trading physical lab processes for computer–driven non–destructive techniques, creating possibilities for the image to be pushed any way we wish in post. In a time when film is disappearing fast and digital is making progress in image quality improvement, it has become important for cinematographers to master these new tools."

(Vilmos Zsigmond ASC HSC, IMAGO European Federation of Cinematographers)


aesthetics • American Society of Cinematgraphers (ASC) • Andrew Wyeth • ARRI Alexas • art of colour • available lightcamera technologycinematographycolour • colour bias • colour correctioncolour saturation • colourist • computer-driven techniques • digital capturedigital cinema technologydigital cinematography • digital intermediates • digital negativedigital picturesdigital progressdigital technology • European Federation of Cinematographers • faded images • film grain • film grain texture • film lighting • filmic art • filmmaking • Georges de La Tour • GoProimage contrast • image highlights • image manipulation • image quality • image shadows • image sharpness • image tone • IMAGO European Federation of Cinematographers • iPhone cinematographyKodak Eastman • lab process • light exposure • look and texture • low lightmaking process • McCabe and Mrs Miller (1971) • mobile video productionnew technology • non-destructive techniques • organic grain texture • painting with light • pastel colours • post-productionpre-productionrapid technological changeRED ONERembrandt van Rijn • retraining • Robert Altman • soft image quality • Sony camerataste (sociology) • taste cultivation • taste formations • Vilmos Zsigmond • visual compositionvisual representation • visual richness • visual sensibilityvisual storytelling • visual texture


Simon Perkins
17 FEBRUARY 2013

Let's not let new technology change our profession or our industry...

"This newscast from KRON in San Francisco in 1981 has been making the rounds recently. It's labeled 'primitive Internet report,' but what it presents is actually one example of the many pre–Internet efforts that the newspaper industry made to try to plan for an online future – and stake out its own turf in that forthcoming world. ...

In the video, you can hear [Dave] Cole say, of the 'Electronic Examiner' he was demonstrating, 'We're not in it to make money.' At the end, the announcer points out that an entire edition of the paper takes two hours to download, at a $5/hour cost – making this 'telepaper' little competition for the paper edition. 'For the moment at least,' the reporter declares, over the image of a sidewalk news vendor hawking the afternoon edition, 'this fellow isn't worried about being out of a job.'

Though the piece does say that 'Engineers now predict the day will come when we get all our newspapers and magazines by home computer,' its underlying message is – Don't worry. This crazy computer stuff isn't going to change anything much for now. And indeed it took 10 years for any sort of online service to become even remotely popular. Almost 30 years later, newspapers are still in business; some are even still sold by guys on sidewalks. It has taken this long for the technology to transform the newspaper biz in a big way. ...

But even as the downloads sped up and the connect–time costs dropped, the industry held onto that approach, instead of coming to grips with the fundamentally different dynamics of a new communications medium. What had made sense in the early days over time became a crippling set of blinders. The spirit of experimentation that the Examiner set out with in 1981 dried up, replaced by an industry–wide allergy to fundamental change.

'Let's use the new technology,' editors and executives would say, 'but let's not let the technology change our profession or our industry.' They largely succeeded in resisting change. Now it's catching up with them."

(Scott Rosenberg, 29 January 2009)



Simon Perkins
21 NOVEMBER 2012

V2_Institute for the Unstable Media

"In the turbulent year of 1981 the building at Vughterstraat 234 in Den Bosch was squatted by a group of artists and musicians, including a young Joke Brouwer and an almost as young Alex Adriaansens. There was no place for their sounds, art or ideas in the established venues, so they created one of their own at 'V234,' quickly shortened to 'V2.' September 3 and 4, 1981 the first events where organized. In 1982, these pragmatic anarchists decided to organize themselves into a foundation, and V2_ was officially born."



1981 • 3D projection • Alex Adriaansens • art in electronic networks • art installationart productionartist collectiveartistic means • arts practice • audiovisual arts • centre for art and media technology • communications media • computers as an artistic medium • cyberspace • Den Bosch • digital imagery • digital techniques • do-it-yourself • Dutch Electronic Art Festival • Einsturzende Neubauten • electronic mediaelectronic musicexhibition space • Institute for the Unstable Media • interactive installationsinteractive video • interdisciplinary workspace • international media laboratory • ISDN • Joke Brouwer • knowledge exchange • Laibach • machine art • manifesto • mixed media applications • multimedia centre • multimedia organisationNetherlands • network and communications media • new technical possibilitiesnew technology • pragmatic anarchists • public events • public spaceroboticsRotterdamSonic Youthsound installation • squatting • The building gave room for concerts and performances analogue media • unstable media • V2_virtual realityvisual arts • Vughterstraat 234 • world wide web


Simon Perkins
07 JUNE 2012

BBC Academy TV Fast Train: the future of TV

"Predictions are problematic... but that didn't stop our expert panel of programme makers, technologists and digital strategists from peering into the future and speculating wildly about the shape of things to come. How will Technology influence TV in one, three and five years time? How will audiences be sharing, engaging with and reacting to TV content across news, sport and drama? How will broadcasters be measuring success, and what revenue streams will be funding TV in one, three and five years?"

(BBC Academy, 2012)

1). "TVFT: the future of TV", (32.00MB – Audio). This is a recording of a masterclass from the BBC Academy's TV Fast Train event held on 16 May 2012. Maggie Philbin hosts this masterclass about the the shape of things to come. She is joined by Peter Barron, head of PR at Google, Nick Newman, digital strategist and consultant and former head of BBC Journalism Products within the Future Media department, Daniel Danker general manager of programmes on demand and Peter Cassidy, director at FremantleMedia UK Interactive.


2012advances in technologyBBC • BBC Academy • BBC journalism • College of Production • download • FremantleMedia UK Interactive • future • future media • future of TV • Google (GOOG) • Google TV • new technology • PoD (acronym) • podcastpredictions • programmes on demand • technology • technology predictions • technology touches everythingtelevisionthe futureTV • TV Fast Train • TVFT


Simon Perkins
03 MAY 2012

Aleks Krotoski's The Digital Human

"Aleks Krotoski asks not just what technology can do for us but also what is it doing to us and the world we're creating? Each week she takes us on a journey to where people are living their digital lives to explore how technology touches everything we do both on and offline.

Taking broad themes of modern living as a starting point she charts the experiences of homo digitas; both the remarkable and the mundane, to understand how we are changing just as quickly as the advances in our technology.

What does the deluge of images from digital photography mean for our memory when every second is being recorded, edited and posted online for posterity? Are the identities we create in social media no more than exercises in personal branding, to be managed and protected like any other product? And as traditional churches struggle to leverage technology to spread their faith do the behaviours we all display online have more in common with religion than rationality?

The time for wonder at the digital world is over, we live with it in every day. The question really is who are we now because of it?"

(BBC Radio 4)

Fig.1 "Mack on a summer morning", 30 March 2011 [–memories.html].



2012advances in technology • Aleks Krotoski • BBC Radio 4 • being edited • constructed identitiescultural identitycyberpsychology • deluge of images • digital photography • digital world is over • display online • every second is being recorded • everydayfaith • homo digitas • human behaviouridentityidentity performanceimpression management • leverage technology • living digital livesmediated environmentsmemorymodern livingnew technologyonline and offlineour digital livespersonal branding • posted online • posterityrationalityreligionself-monitoringself-reflexivitysocial changesocial mediasocial media identitiestechnology touches everythingvirtual presence


Simon Perkins

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