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06 OCTOBER 2015

Hans Rosling: Don't Panic - The Truth About Population

"'Don't Panic' is a one-hour long documentary produced by Wingspan Productions and broadcasted on BBC on the 7th of November 2013.

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2013BangladeshBBC2birth and deathchanging worldchild mortalitycountry and comparative datadata visualisationdebunkingdemographicsdeveloping countriesdifferent strata of society • Dollar Street • economic developmentenvironmental determinismenvironmental statistics • extreme poverty • family planning • Gapmindergender equalityglobal population • global portrait • Hans Roslinghuman history • human mortality • ignorance survey • Indiainfographics • life expectancy • mortalityour planetPeoples Republic of Chinapopulation change • population explosion • population growthpopulation statisticspovertypreconceptionsmall data • social development • social inequalitystatistical graphicsstatistician • street metaphor • sustainable global development • television documentary • understanding statistics • United Nationsvisualising data • Wingspan Productions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 NOVEMBER 2014

Protofarm 2050: guide to free farming (urban agricultural speculation)

"Design Indaba invited five designers to look beyond the possibilities and predictions currently in the public domain. Futurefarmers, 5.5 designers, Dunne&Raby, Revital Cohen and Frank Tjepkema each created a unique vision of the year 2050 with increased urbanisation and population, limited natural resources, climate challenges and digital–biological integration. Defining farming as the sustainable cultivation of a renewable resource, Design Indaba presented Protofarm 2050 at the ICSID World Design Congress in Singapore from 23 to 25 November [2009]."

(Design Indaba)

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20092050 • 5.5 designers • agricultural futures • agricultureAnthony Dunne • Anthony Lebosse • bookletcamouflage • Cape Town Design Festival • Claire Renard • climate challenges • climate change • dandelion • dark humour • Design Indaba • designers • digital-biological integration • Dunne and Raby • edible fauna • edible flora • ethical consumptionfarmingFiona Rabyfishingflora and faunafood • food design • food gathering activitiesfood security • food system • Frank Tjepkema • fruit • Futurefarmers (artist collective) • gleaning • hunting and gathering tactics • ICSID World Design Congress • Jean-Sebastien Blanc • leftovers • limited natural resources • meat consumption • Paris • pate • pigeon • poodlepopulation growth • Protofarm 2050 • prototype tools • rat • renewable resource • Revital Cohen • Seine • Singaporesite-specific interventionsSouth Africa • speculative approaches • speculative designspeculative proposals • speculative scenarios • speculative urbanism • starlingssustainabilitysustainable consumption • sustainable cultivation • tactical behaviourtactics • urban food • urbanisation • Vincent Baranger

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 NOVEMBER 2012

MediaCity 4: reflecting on pluralities and globalities of MediaCities

International Conference, Workshops and Exhibition University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

3–5 May 2013 Call for Paper Abstracts DEADLINE: 12 November 2012

"What new lines of inquiry and emergent relations between urbanity and digital media are found in non–Western cities, in post–Capitalist cities, in cities hosting civic turbulence or crossing international boundaries? What urban–medial relations are taking shape differently in urban milieux that may have been heretofore overlooked? These cities are deserving of more attention than ever before, as sites of population growth, of new cultural and social formations, of new entanglements between urban life and contemporary media, communications and information technologies, and more. MediaCities promises to expand our understanding of both media and the city today, and to articulate new sites of practice and working methods for an expanding field. ...

Areas of interest may fall broadly into several themes, with the assumption that others will appear in the process of proposals and discussion leading up to the event, always expanding our lexicon and mental maps of MediaCities globally. These themes are: Other Urbans, Uncommons, Zero Growth Cities, Media Geographies and Bordervilles."

(Jordan Geiger)

Fig.1 Reuters/Sheng Li (2011), "ethnic Dong minority woman uses her mobile phone to take a picture of herself after a Kam Grand Choir gathering in Tongguan village of Liping county, Guizhou province". [http://pixtale.net/2011/10/21st–century–china/#img33]

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2013architecturebelongingborderlandborders • borderville • citiescivic engagement • civic turbulence • communications and information technologies • conferencecontemporary media • crossing international boundaries • digital media • emergent relations • geography • global information society • global network societyglobalisation and localisationglobalising society • globalities • interaction designinternational conference • media and the city • media art • media art and architecture • media geographies and bordervilles • MediaCity (conference) • new lines of enquiry • new sites of practice • nomadism • other urbans • pluralities • population growth • post-Capitalist cities • sociology • State University of New York • uncommons • University at Buffalo • urban life • urban milieux • urban planning • urban-medial relations • urbanity • urbanity and digital media • zero growth cities

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 APRIL 2012

Big Question: Feast or Famine?

"The world population is growing by 75 million people each year. That's almost the size of Germany. Today, we're nearing 7 billion people. At this rate, we'll reach 9 billion people by 2040. And we all need to eat. But how? That's a critical issue the IonE tackles in our first Big Question video.

At the same time, agriculture is a major contributor to climate change and will suffer as an industry from the consequences."

(Institute on the Environment, 2009, University of Minnesota)

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2009 • 2040 • agricultureanimated presentation • Aral Sea • call to actioncarbon dioxide • cereal crops • climate change • computer models • consequencesconsumption • consumption trends • cows • critical issue • current technologies • desertecology • ecosystems • famine • fertilizer • food • global environmental systems • global populationglobal water crisisgrain production • green revolution • greenhouse gases • greening the desert • H2O • human activitieshuman civilization • human-caused emissions • Institute on the Environment • Jonathan Foley • land use • late 20th century • livestock • meatmethane • nitrous oxide • over-fertilized fields • populationpopulation growthrainforestresource managementrice • Robert Zeigler • ruminant animals • Stanley Wood • sustainability • The Inconvenient Truth • The Other Inconvenient Truth • University of Minnesota • University of Wisconsin • waterworld population

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 APRIL 2011

Five myths about the future of journalism

"There are few things journalists like to discuss more than, well, themselves and the long–term prospects for their industry. How long will print newspapers survive? Are news aggregation sites the future? Or are online paywalls – such as the one the New York Times just launched – the way to go? As media organizations plot their future, it's worth discarding some misconceptions about what it will take to keep the press from becoming yesterday's news.

1. The traditional news media are losing their audience.

Many predicted that the rise of the Internet and online publishing meant that mainstream media organizations would lose their readers and viewers, with technology breaking their oligarchic control over news. But that's not the overall picture.

Yes, people are migrating online. In 2010, the Internet passed newspapers for the first time as the platform where Americans 'regularly' get news, according to survey data from the Pew Research Center. Forty–six percent of adults say they go online for news at least three times a week, as opposed to 40 percent who read newspapers that often. Only local television news is a more popular destination, at 50 percent.

But online news consumers are heading primarily to traditional sources. Of the 25 most popular news Web sites in the United States, for instance, all but two are 'legacy' media sources, such as the New York Times or CNN, or aggregators of traditional media, such as Yahoo or Google News. Of the roughly 200 news sites with the highest traffic, 81 percent are traditional media or aggregators of it. And some old media are seeing their overall audience – in print and on the Web – grow.

The crisis facing traditional media is about revenue, not audience. And in that crisis, newspapers have been hardest hit: Ad revenue for U.S. newspapers fell 48 percent from 2006 to 2010.

2. Online news will be fine as soon as the advertising revenue catches up.

Such hopes are misplaced. In 2010, Web advertising in the United States surpassed print advertising for the first time, reaching $26 billion. But only a small fraction of that, perhaps less than a fifth, went to news organizations. The largest share, roughly half, went to search engines, primarily Google. The newspaper industry illustrates the problem. Even though about half the audience may now be accessing papers online, the newspaper industry took in $22.8 billion last year in print ad revenue but only $3 billion in Web–based revenue.

Journalism thrived in decades past because news media were the primary means by which industry reached customers. In the new media landscape, there are many ways to reach the audience, and news represents only a small share.

3. Content will always be king.

The syllogism that helped journalism prosper in the 20th century was simple: Produce the journalism (or 'content') that people want, and you will succeed. But that may no longer be enough.

The key to media in the 21st century may be who has the most knowledge of audience behavior, not who produces the most popular content. Understanding what sites people visit, what content they view, what products they buy and even their geographic coordinates will allow advertisers to better target individual consumers. And more of that knowledge will reside with technology companies than with content producers.

Google, for instance, will know much more about each user than will the proprietor of any one news site. It can track users' online behavior through its Droid software on mobile phones, its Google Chrome Web browser, its search engine and its new tablet software.

The ability to target users is why Apple wants to control the audience data that goes through the iPad. And the company that may come to know the most about you is Facebook, with which users freely share what they like, where they go and who their friends are.

4. Newspapers around the world are on the decline.

Actually, print circulation worldwide was up more than 5 percent in the past five years, and the number of newspapers is growing. In general, print media are thriving in the developing world and suffering in rich nations. Print newspaper ad revenue, for instance, rose by 13 percent in India and by 10 percentin Egypt and Lebanon in the last year for which data is available. But it fell by 8 percent in France and 20 percent in Japan.

The forces tied to a thriving print newspaper industry include growing literacy, expanding population, economic development and low broadband penetration. In India, for example, the population is growing and becoming more literate, but a substantial portion is not yet online.

By and large, American newspapers are suffering the most. Roughly 75 percent of their revenue comes from advertising, vs. 30 percent or 40 percent in many other countries, where papers live and die by circulation. That means the collapse of advertising is not hitting papers elsewhere as hard as it is hitting them here. It also suggests that the need to charge for online access may be even more important abroad.

5. The solution is to focus on local news.

Going 'hyperlocal' was the war cry of Wall Street to the news industry five years ago. The reasoning was simple: In the Internet age, when users can access content from anywhere, it didn't make sense for local operations to compete with the big national news providers.

The problem is that hyperlocal content, by definition, has limited appeal. To amass an audience large enough to generate significant ad revenue, you have to produce a large volume of content from different places, and that is expensive. On top of that, many hyperlocal advertisers are not yet online, limiting the ad dollars.

Now we are entering what might be called Hyperlocal 2.0, and the market is still up for grabs. Google, which garners two–thirds of all search advertising dollars nationally, doesn't exert similar control over local advertising. Locally, display ads – all those banners and pop–ups – are a bigger share of the market than search ads.

But how to produce local content remains a mystery. Can you put paywalls around it? Can you build a 'pro–am' model, in which professional journalists work with low–paid amateurs to produce a comprehensive report? Or will the winner be something like AOL's Patch, in which hundreds of hyperlocal sites are owned by a single company that can connect those readers with major advertisers?

So far, no one has really cracked the code for producing profitable local news online.

Tom Rosenstiel is director of the Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism. He is the co–author, with Bill Kovach, of 'Blur: How to Know What's True in the Age of Information Overload.'"

(Tom Rosenstiel, 7 April 2011, The Washington Post)

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201021st centuryadvertisingaggregatorAOLAppleaudienceauthorship • Bill Kovach • broadband penetration • CNNcontentcontent is kingconvergence • death of newspapers • digital cultureeconomic developmentEgyptFacebookforecasting • fourth estate • France • future of journalism • Google Newshyperlocal • Hyperlocal 2.0 • Indiainternet ageiPadJapanjournalism • Lebanon • legacy media sources • literacylocal television • low-paid amateurs • media organisations • new media landscapeNew York Timesnews • news aggregation • news media • newspaper industry • newspapersold mediaonline publishing • patch.com • Pew Research Center • population growth • print circulation • pro-am model • professional journalistssearch engine • television news • Tom Rosenstiel • traditional media • Wall Street • web advertising • Yahoo!

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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