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22 FEBRUARY 2015

Eye Appeal: Spectacle on Stage and in Life

"From ancient times to the present 'spectacle' (the visual aspects of human performance–architecture, scenery, costumes, makeup, lighting, special effects, and staging) has been used to expressively embody and evoke meaning in rituals, ceremonies, and artistic performances. This course [Eye Appeal: Spectacle on Stage and in Life at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro] will examine the use of spectacle as an expressive mode of communication in human performance from antiquity to the present."

(Bob Hansen, 2004)

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TAGS

2004 • aesthetician • antiquityart historyartifice • artistic performances • Ben Jonson • Bryan Holmes • ceremony • Cinquecento • circus • commanding form • costume design • court spectacles • creation of spectacle • dramatic literature • entertainment spectacle • expressive mode of communication • eyecatching • George Kernodle • high renaissance • human performance • Inigo Jones • Jean-Baptiste Poquelin • John Lahr • Jonathan Price • lecture programmeLeonardo da Vincilightingmake-upMichelangelo • Moliere • parade • Phyllis Hartnoll • physiological reactions • psychological reactions • public showsRaphael • religious rites • renaissanceritualscene designsceneryscenographysetting • Shakespeare • show (spectacle)special effectsspectacle • spectacles • spetakel • stage magic • stagecraft • staging • Susanne Langer • Sybil Rosenfeld • technical theatre • theatre architecture • Thomas Heck • TitianTiziano • Tiziano Vecelli • Tiziano Vecellio • University of North Carolina • University of North Carolina at Greensboro • visual and performance elements • visual spectaclevisual spectacular • visually striking

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 OCTOBER 2012

LUDOLOGY MEETS NARRATOLOGY: Similitude and differences between (video)games and narrative

"Literary theory and narratology have been helpful to understand cybertexts and videogames. Aristotelian Poetics [Laurel, 1993], Russian formalism [Porush and Hivner, ?], and poststructuralism [Landow, 1992] are some of the different perspectives that have been used to study the subject.

Some authors see cybertexts and videogames as a new form of or as an expansion of traditional narrative or drama. The fact is that these computer programs share many elements with stories: characters, chained actions, endings, settings.

However, there is another dimension that has been usually almost ignored when studying this kind of computer software: to analyze them as games.

The problems of using a 'game' perspective are many. Basically, traditional games have always had less academic status than other objects, like narrative. And because of this, game formalist studies are fragmented through different disciplines, and not very well developed.

In this paper we will propose to explore videogames and cybertexts as games. Our intention is not to replace the narratologic approach, but to complement it. We want to better understand what is the relationship with narrative and videogames; their similarities and differences."

(Gonzalo Frasca, 1999)

Frasca, Gonzalo (1999) 'Ludology Meets Narratology. Similitude and Differences between (Video)games and Narrative'. Originally published in Finnish in Parnasso 1999: 3, 365–71.

TAGS

1999 • Albert Sidney Hornby • Andre Lalande • Aristotelian Poetics • Aristotles Poetics • Brenda Laurelcausalitycausally relatedcausally related narrative events • chained actions • character • Claude Bremond • computer programme • computer software • cybertext • cybertexts • Daniel Vidart • David Porush • ending • Espen AarsethFILE (festival) • game formalist studies • game perspective • game studiesgame theorygames • George Landow • Gerald Prince • Gonzalo Frasca • Jean Piagetliterary theory • ludology • narrative and videogames • narratologic approach • narratologynew form • Oswald Ducrot • post-structuralism • Roger Caillois • Roland Barthes • Russian formalism • Schaeffer Jean-Marie • setting • similarities and differences • stories • studying games • Todd Hivnor • traditional drama • traditional narrative • Umberto Ecovideo gamevideogames

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 SEPTEMBER 2012

Screenwriting: the two worlds of your screenplay

"When we watch a movie, we enter a world created by the screenwriter. From the very first scene, events and characters begin to define a world, set in time and place, with implied values and social nuances. However, this initial world we see early on is only the first of two worlds that the screenwriter will create to tell the story."

(Charles Deemer, Film Underground)

Fig.1 publicity still for "Life of Pi"

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TAGS

call to action • catalytic moment • defining a world • entering a world • everyman • extraordinary world (screenwriting) • inciting event • leaving the ordinary world • main character • making choices • mise-en-scenenarrative theory • ordinary world (screenwriting) • passive protagonist • proactive characters • protagonist • reactive characters • screenwritingsetting • story moment • story world • time and place • world of the story

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 AUGUST 2012

Hannah Starkey: reconstructed scenes from everyday life

"Using actors within carefully considered settings, Hannah Starkey's photographs reconstruct scenes from everyday life with the concentrated stylisation of film. Starkey's images picture women engaged in regular routines such as loitering in the street, sitting in cafes, or passively shopping. Starkey captures these generic 'in between' moments of daily life with a sense of relational detachment. Her still images operate as discomforting 'pauses'; where the banality of existence is freeze–framed in crisis point, creating reflective instances of inner contemplation, isolation, and conflicting emotion.

Through the staging of her scenes, Starkey's images evoke suggestive narratives through their appropriation of cultural templates: issues of class, race, gender, and identity are implied through the physical appearance of her models or places. Adopting the devices of filmography, Starkey's images are intensified with a pervasive voyeuristic intrusion, framing moments of intimacy for unapologetic consumption. Starkey often uses composition to heighten this sense of personal and emotional disconnection, with arrangements of lone figures separated from a group, or segregated with metaphoric physical divides such as tables or mirrors.

Often titling her work as Untitled, followed by a generalised date of creation, her photographs parallel the interconnected vagueness of memory, recalling suggestions of events and emotions without fixed location or context. Her work presents a platform where fiction and reality are blurred, illustrating the gap between personal fragility and social construction, and merging the experiences of strangers with our own."

(Saatchi Gallery)

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TAGS

artificeawkwardnessbanalitycinematic conventionscultural appropriationcultural signals • cultural templates • daily lifedetachmentemotionlesseveryday life • fiction and reality • film stylisationframed momentsfreeze frame • Hannah Starkey • in-betweenin-between narratives • inner contemplation • intimacyintrospectionisolation • loitering • momentsnarrative photographynarrative scenesobservationpausephotographyplaceness • regular routines • routineSaatchi Galleryscene reconstructionsettingstagingstylisedsuggestive narrativesvignette • voyeuristic intrusion

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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