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Which clippings match 'Modern Art' keyword pg.2 of 2
16 JANUARY 2013

1937 Munich exhibition of Degenerate Art

"00:25:43 Wide view of the new House of German Art, a museum dedicated to Nazi–approved artwork, with long, white columns. 00:26:03 Across the street, INTs of the 1937 exhibition of Entartete Kunst ['Degenerate Art'] on the second floor of the Institute of Archaeology. Room 1 with 'Kruzifixus' [Crucified Christ] sculpture by Ludwig Gies (1921), formerly in Luebeck cathedral. 00:26:66 Room 3 with 'Maedchen mit blauem Haar' [Girl with Blue Hair] by Eugen Hoffmann. Wall text refers to a Kandinsky piece 'Zweierlei Rot' (1928) purchased for the National Gallery in Berlin for 2,000 marks as 'paid by taxes from the working German people.' 00:26:39 Wide view of the crowds in Room 3, including the mocking inscription by Georg Grosz, 'Nehmen Sie Dada ernst! Es lohnt sich.' [Take Dada seriously! It's worth it.] Male docent showing visitors Room 3 with 'Springendes Pferd' [Jumping Horse] by expressionist Heinrich Campendonk from the National Gallery and the small painting 'Um den Fisch' [Around the Fish] by Paul Klee. 00:27:13 Visitors moving through Room 3, looking at sculptures beneath an inscription in wavy lines, 'We act as if we were painters, poets, or whatever, but we...are just putting one giant swindle over on the world....' 00:27:24 Exhibit lobby with large head sculpture 'Der neue Mensch' [The New Man] by Otto Freundlich (1912), which was used for the cover of the exhibition guide. 00:27:37 EXTs, people coming out of the building, car and bicycle pass by on the street. Large sign over exhibition entrance: 'Ausstellung 'Entartete Kunst' Eintritt frei.' [Exhibition 'Degenerate Art' Free entrance.] INT, Room 4 with 'Der Strand' [The Beach] by Max Beckmann. 00:28:00 Profile view of two women looking at paintings by Ernst Kirchner and Oskar Kokoschka in Room 4 with 'Sitzender Mann' [Sitting Man] by Erich Heckel of the artists' group 'Die Bruecke' [The Bridge] and 'Die Mulattin' [The Mulatto Woman] by Emil Nolde behind them. Men view works in Room 4 and move through exhibit. 00:28:33 Room 5 with 'Bahnhof in Koenigstein' [Koenigstein station] by Ernst Kirchner, 'Blumen und Tieren' [Flowers and Animals] by Heinrich Campendonk (1926), 'Handstand' by Willi Baumeister, 'Im Kanu' [In the Canoe] by Jean Metzinger, 'Komposition' [Composition] by Piet Mondrian (1929), 'Stilleben' [Still Life] by Karl Schmitt–Rottluff (1932). 00:29:07 The inscription over the doorway from Room 6 to Room 7, 'Sie hatten vier Jahre Zeit.' [They had four years' time.] In Room 1, 'Christus und die Suenderin' [Christ and the Sinner] by Emil Nolde (1929). Visitors before the Dada wall in Room 3, pan to right."

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TAGS

1937 • degenerate art • deviant status • Emil Nolde • Entartete Kunst • Erich Heckel • Ernst Kirchner • Eugen Hoffmann • exhibitionExhibition of Degenerate Art • Georg Grosz • Heinrich Campendonk • House of German Art • Jean Metzinger • Julien Bryan • Karl Schmitt-Rottluff • Kruzifixus • Ludwig Gies • Max Beckmann • modern artMunichmuseumNazi Germany • Nazi-approved artwork • Oskar Kokoschka • Otto Freundlich • out-groups • Paul Klee • Piet MondrianUnited States Holocaust Memorial Museum • Wassily Kandinsky • white columns • Willi Baumeister

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JANUARY 2013

Call to Order: the pretentious sterility of culture

"In a masterstroke of design, the curator of Chaos and Classicism, Kenneth Silver, chose a work of art to illustrate the Nazi annexation of neoclassicism that at first glance is anything but threatening. The Four Elements by Adolf Ziegler decorated the walls of Hitler's Munich apartment. A member of the Nazi Party, Ziegler was charged by Hitler in 1937 to stage–manage the purge of modern art in the notorious Exhibition of Degenerate Art. Ziegler's depiction of four nude women who symbolize fire, earth, air and water, the four elements of nature recognized in antiquity, personifies little but the pretentious sterility of culture under the Third Reich. Yet, it is the perfect embodiment of the banality of evil."

(Ed Voves, 4 October 2010)

Fig.1 Adolf Ziegler, The Four Elements: Fire, Water and Earth, Air, (Die vier Elemente. Feuer, Wasser und Erde, Luft), before 1937, Oil on canvas, three panels, left to right: 170.3 x 85.2 cm, 171 x 190.8 cm, and 161.3 x 76.7 cm, Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen, Sammlung Moderner Kunst in der Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich.

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TAGS

1937Adolf Hitler • Adolf Ziegler • air • antiquitybanalitycall to orderchaos and classicismclassical beautyclassical formcorrectioncultural productionEarth • elements • emasculation • essential elements of artessentialismExhibition of Degenerate Artfascismfire • Kenneth Silver • masterstroke of design • modern artmodernismMunichnatureNazi • Nazi Party • neoclassical revivalneoclassicismnude women • pretentious sterility of culture • purificationpurity • racial purity • return to ordersterility • The Four Elements • Third Reichwaterwork of art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JULY 2012

dOCUMENTA (13)

"dOCUMENTA (13) is dedicated to artistic research and forms of imagination that explore commitment, matter, things, embodiment, and active living in connection with, yet not subordinated to, theory. These are terrains where politics are inseparable from a sensual, energetic, and worldly alliance between current research in various scientific and artistic fields and other knowledges, both ancient and contemporary. dOCUMENTA (13) is driven by a holistic and non–logocentric vision that is skeptical of the persisting belief in economic growth. This vision is shared with, and recognizes, the shapes and practices of knowing of all the animate and inanimate makers of the world, including people. (C. Christov–Bakargiev)"

(dOCUMENTA)

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TAGS

2012 • ancient knowledges • animate makers of the world • artistic fields • artistic practiceartistic researcharts festival • Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev • conjecturecontemporary artcontemporary art exhibitionscontemporary art symposia • contemporary knowledges • crisis of empiricismcritical theory • current artistic research • current scientific research • divergent conceptsdOCUMENTA (festival)economic growthenvisioningexperimental knowledgeGermanyholistic approach • holistic vision • inanimate makers of the world • Kassel • knowledges • lateral thinkinglogocentricmedia artmetaphorical representationmodern art • non-logocentric vision • not yet subordinated to theory • scientific and artistic fields • scientific field • shapes and practices • speculative designspeculative science

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 JULY 2012

Fountain: an ordinary article of life without useful significance

"Fountain is one of Duchamp's most famous works and is widely seen as an icon of twentieth–century art. The original, which is now lost, consisted of a standard urinal, laid flat on its back rather than upright in its usual position, and signed 'R. Mutt 1917'. The Tate's work is a 1964 replica and is made from glazed earthenware painted to resemble the original porcelain. The signature is reproduced in black paint. Fountain is an example of what Duchamp called a 'readymade', an ordinary manufactured object designated by the artist as a work of art. It epitomises the assault on convention and good taste for which he and the Dada movement are best known.

The idea of designating such a lowly object as a work of art came from a discussion between Duchamp and his American friends the collector Walter Arensburg and the artist Joseph Stella. Following this conversation, Duchamp bought an urinal from a plumbers' merchants, and submitted it to an exhibition organised by the Society of Independent Artists. The Board of Directors, who were bound by the constitution of the Society to accept all members' submissions, took exception to the Fountain and refused to exhibit it. Duchamp and Arensburg, who were both on the Board, resigned immediately in protest. An article published at the time, which is thought to have been written by Duchamp, claimed, 'Mr Mutt's fountain is not immoral, that is absurd, no more than a bathtub is immoral. It is a fixture that you see every day in plumbers' shop windows. Whether Mr Mutt with his own hands made the fountain has no importance. He CHOSE it. He took an ordinary article of life, placed it so that its useful significance disappeared under the new title and point of view – created a new thought for that object.' ('The Richard Mutt Case', The Blind Man, New York, no.2, May 1917, p.5.)"

(Sophie Howarth, April 2000)

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TAGS

1917196420th centuryabsurdAlfred Stieglitzartart historyassault • assault on convention • assault on good taste • avant-garde • black paint • contextconventioncultural signalscultural significance of objectscurationDadaDada movement • designated by the artist • everydayexhibition • fixture • Fountain (work of art) • glazed earthenware • good taste • icon of twentieth-century art • immoral • information in context • Joseph Stella • layers of meaning • lowly object • Marcel Duchampmodern artobjet trouve • ordinary article of life • ordinary manufactured objectporcelain • R. Mutt 1917 • readymadereplica • Society of Independent Artists • Tate Modern • took exception • twentieth-century art • urinaluseful significance • Walter Arensburg • work of art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 APRIL 2011

Fragments and Figments of Knowledge: the Documentation of Contemporary Art

"The research project Methodology for the Documentation of Contemporary Art was initiated by Professor Dr Hubertus Kohle and Dr Harald Kraemer at the interdisciplinary Kulturwissenschaftliches Forschungskolleg at the Universities of Aachen, Bonn and Cologne [1]. The main aim of this project (1999–2001) was to develop strategies and structures for a methodology for the study and documentation of modern and contemporary art. Furthermore, the project was to demonstrate, through specific characteristics of modern art, the need for new documentation procedures and the use of digital technologies. Traditional, static methods of documentation can be significantly extended through the application of multimedia electronic technologies. The diverse prerequisites and specific demands of contemporary art require a changed methodology of analysis and documentation. Hence, the aim of the project was to find the answers to the following questions: to what extent can the revamped documentation methods provide a basis for meaningful interpretation of contemporary art? And what is the role of interactive digital multimedia technology here?"

(Harald Kraemer, 2001)

[1] Kulturwissenschaftliches Forschungskolleg (SFB / FK 427) 'Medien und kulturelle Kommunikation'. Nicole Birtsch, Kathrin Lucht, Martina Nied, Simone Schmickl and Christina Hemsley were the other members of the team.

TAGS

2001archive • Bonn • Colognecontemporary art • digital art history • digital culture • digital multimedia technology • digital technologiesdocumentation • documentation procedures • Harald Kraemer • Hubertus Kohle • ICTintegrationmanagementmedia artmethodologymodern artmultimedianew mediaorderingprocedureresearch projectstaticstorage • structuring • technology • Universities of Aachen

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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