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Which clippings match 'Misogyny' keyword pg.1 of 1
02 SEPTEMBER 2013

Defined Lines: tongue-in-cheek parody of Blurred Lines music video

"A feminist parody version of Robin Thicke's Blurred Lines ... by a group of law students from Auckland University, was posted on YouTube on Friday night and had over 300,000 views at 6am this morning."

(TVNZ, 02 September 2013)

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TAGS

2013 • Adelaide Dunn • Auckland Law Revue Girls • bigot • Blurred Lines (2013) • chauvinism • chauvinistic • Chillbox Creative • critical commentarydepictions of womenexploitationfeminist parodyfeminist perspectivehumourlaw student • Marvin Gaye • Miley Cyrus • Milon Tesiram • misogynyMTVMTV Video Music Awardsmusic video • Olivia Lubbock • parodyparody versionplaythingporno-chic • Rich Bryan • Robin Thicke • scantily cladsex crimesexismsexistsexploitation • sexual discrimination • sexualised depictions • sexually explicit content • The Law Revue girls • tongue-in-cheek • TV One • University of AucklandYouTube • Zoe Ellwood

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 AUGUST 2013

How would it feel to be represented by someone like Tony Abbott?

"Every week Tony Abbott makes another comment that reveals very concerning social views. Commentators blow them off as 'gaffes', but this isn't about gaffes. It's about values. It's about our national character if our Prime Minister labels refugees who seek our help as 'illegal', even as they exercise their legal, human right to flee danger. It's about the message we send to young gay and lesbian Australians, if our Prime Minister talks about their equality as a 'passing fashion,' and what that does to their self–esteem. It's about our values if a Prime Minister talks to 'the housewives of Australia as they're doing their ironing,' says his colleagues are 'not just a pretty face' and have 'sex appeal' and calls on his opponent to 'make an honest woman of herself'. Prime Ministers reflect our national values, and have the power to change them radically. Does what Tony Abbott says matter? Well, in 17 days he wants to be speaking for all of us. That's why GetUp members are launching this ad. Will you be part of it?"

(GetUp!)

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2013 • abortion rights • Australia • Australian Federal Government • Australian GovernmentAustralian Liberal Partycasual homophobiacivil libertiesconservativeconservative attitudesconservative catchphrasesequality • gaffes • gayGetUp!governancehousewifehuman rightsIndigenous Australiansintoleranceironinglesbianmisogyny • national character • national values • personal valuespoliticsPrime Ministerquoterefugeeself-esteemsexist languagesocial conservatismsocial responsibility • social views • Tony Abbott • values

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 FEBRUARY 2013

Pre Certification Video

"A 'pre-cert video' (Pre-Certification) is any videotape (or laserdisc/CED) issued in the UK before the introduction of the 1984 Video Recordings Act.

Pre-cert videos were not required by law to be submitted to the BBFC so the era was unregulated, leading to many uncut releases of videos which would have fallen foul of the BBFC's strict guidelines, and would therefore have been censored if submission to the board was a legal requirement.

However, whilst many of the larger respectable companies simply issued their previously BBFC certificated cinema releases onto video to play safe as they feared there was bound to be a clampdown at some stage, some of the smaller independent companies decided to take advantage of the unregulated video rentals market by issuing 'strong uncut' versions depicting graphic violence and gore. A whole barrage of titles previously banned by the BBFC from getting a cinema release suddenly ended up uncensored on home video.

What began as a bill drafted by little known Luton Tory back bencher Graham Bright was made law after he and the tabloid press (most notably The Daily Mail) had successfully whipped the media into a frenzied hysteria over so-called 'video nasties'. Ban the Sadist Videos! was one of the more famous headlines they ran. When the bill was made law it became a legal requirement that all videotapes must be submitted to the BBFC for classification (and possible cuts).

The pre-cert video era is best remembered (amongst horror fans in particular) for the ensuing 'video nasty' debacle in which a selection of 72 videotapes were singled out and prosecuted by the DPP (Director of Public Prosecutions) under Section 2 or Section 3 of the OPA (Obscene Publications Act). Of these, 39 titles were deemed by the courts to be obscene and it's those titles which formed the final 'Video Nasties list."

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TAGS

1984analogue mediab-moviebad tastebanned • Betamax • British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) • Capacitance Electronic Disc (CED)censorship • cinema release • collectiblesDaily Mail • DiscoVision • exploitation films • exploitation movies • film classification • gore • Graham Bright • graphic violencehome video • LaserDisc • legislationmisogyny • Music and Video (magazine) • nostalgia • Obscene Publications Act (OPA) • obscenityobsolete medium • Popular Video (magazine) • pre-cert video • pre-cert video era • pre-cert videos • pre-certification video • rare video releases • SelectaVisionsexploitation • shocksploitation • slasher • slasher film • sleaze • teensploitation • Television and Home Video (magazine) • UK • unregulated industry • VCR (N1500) • VCR (N1700) • VHS • Video 2000 • Video Business (magazine) • Video Cassette Recorder (VCR) • Video Cassette Recording • Video Compact Cassette (VCC) • video distribution • video nasties • video nasty • Video News (magazine) • Video Recordings Act • video releases • video rental • video rentals market • Video Retailer (magazine) • Video Review (magazine) • Video The Magazine • Video Today (magazine) • Video Trade Weekly (magazine) • Video Viewer (magazine) • Video Week (magazine) • Video World (magazine) • videocassette • videocassette recorder • VideoDisc • videotapes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 APRIL 2011

The death and rebirth of Duke Nukem Forever: a history

"Duke Nukem Forever was announced in 1997, after its predecessor, Duke Nukem 3D, had rocked the PC market with a hero who liked kicking ass, hanging out with strippers, and murdering alien police officers that were, literally, pigs. It was inappropriate, raunchy, and amazing.

It was also one of the games that gave 3D Realms the success that brought its destruction. Duke Nukem Forever began life as a completely self–funded game; its developer wanted nothing less than perfection, and would chase every update in technology in order to deliver it. The game saw monumental delays, suffered the slings and arrows of a gaming world that was first angry and then tolerant of its favorite whipping boy, had its home taken away, and has since risen from the dead.

Is the public still interested in Duke Nukem? Hell yes it is. This is the story of the gaming industry's favorite joke, and how Duke may finally have the last laugh."

(Ben Kuchera, 7 September 2010)

Fig.1 'Duke Nukem Forever | History of a Legend Episode 1', 2011

Fig.2 trailer from Electronic Entertainment Expo, 1998

Fig.3 video capture of 1991 side–scrolling 'Duke Nukum' version

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TAGS

19911993199619972011 • 3D Realms • action heroalien invasion • Allen Blum • anti-hero • Apogee Softwarecharacter designcomic bookcomputer gameconsolecultural literacydeveloperdigital cultureDuke NukemDuke Nukem 3D • Duke Nukem Forever • Duke Nukem II • Duke Nukem: Manhattan Project • Duke Nukum • E3Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3)first-person shootergames • Gearbox Software • George Broussard • graphic representationheavy metalhistoryhomoeroticismhumour • Joe Siegler • Jon St. John • kick ass • kick ass and chew bubble gum • lair • Los AngelesmisogynyparodyPC gamesPlaystation 3point of viewpop-culture • Randy Pitchford • renegade • run and gunScott Millerself-fundedself-referentialsequel • SHMUP • side-scroller • spectaclestory • Todd Replogle • video gameviolencevisual depictionWolfenstein 3DXbox 360

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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