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Which clippings match 'Apogee Software' keyword pg.1 of 1
10 APRIL 2011

Wolfenstein 3D: Pac-Man intragame

"An intragame is a game within the game, e.g. the Pachinko machine in Duke Nukem 3D [or a Pac–Man level in Wolfenstein 3D]. Since computer games are based on simulator technology that could mix or include any other game in addition to the main game, the main game will be the only one classified."

(Aarseth, Smedstad and Sunnanå, 2003, p.49)

1). Video capture of secret Pac–Man level within Episode 3 of Wolfenstein 3D.

2). Table of Contents for Level Up: Digital Games Research Conference Proceedings, DiGRA and Utrecht University

3). Espen Aarseth, Solveig Marie Smedstad and Lise Sunnanå (2003). 'A multi–dimensional typology of games', in Copier, Marinka; Raessens, Joost, Level Up: Digital Games Research Conference Proceedings, DiGRA and Utrecht University

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TAGS

19923Daction hero • Adrian Carmack • Apogee SoftwareCastle Wolfensteincomputer gamesdigital cultureDiGRADuke Nukem 3Deaster eggEspen Aarsethfirst-person point of viewfirst-person shooterFPS • game genres • game within the game • gameplaygames • id Software • intragame • Lise Sunnana • mise-en-abymeNaziPac-Man • Pachinko • PC gamesreflexivityrun and gunScott Miller • shareware • Solveig Marie Smedstad • tribute • typology of games • video gamevirtual environmentsWolfenstein 3D

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 APRIL 2011

The death and rebirth of Duke Nukem Forever: a history

"Duke Nukem Forever was announced in 1997, after its predecessor, Duke Nukem 3D, had rocked the PC market with a hero who liked kicking ass, hanging out with strippers, and murdering alien police officers that were, literally, pigs. It was inappropriate, raunchy, and amazing.

It was also one of the games that gave 3D Realms the success that brought its destruction. Duke Nukem Forever began life as a completely self–funded game; its developer wanted nothing less than perfection, and would chase every update in technology in order to deliver it. The game saw monumental delays, suffered the slings and arrows of a gaming world that was first angry and then tolerant of its favorite whipping boy, had its home taken away, and has since risen from the dead.

Is the public still interested in Duke Nukem? Hell yes it is. This is the story of the gaming industry's favorite joke, and how Duke may finally have the last laugh."

(Ben Kuchera, 7 September 2010)

Fig.1 'Duke Nukem Forever | History of a Legend Episode 1', 2011

Fig.2 trailer from Electronic Entertainment Expo, 1998

Fig.3 video capture of 1991 side–scrolling 'Duke Nukum' version

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TAGS

19911993199619972011 • 3D Realms • action heroalien invasion • Allen Blum • anti-hero • Apogee Softwarecharacter designcomic bookcomputer gameconsolecultural literacydeveloperdigital cultureDuke NukemDuke Nukem 3D • Duke Nukem Forever • Duke Nukem II • Duke Nukem: Manhattan Project • Duke Nukum • E3Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3)first-person shootergames • Gearbox Software • George Broussard • graphic representationheavy metalhistoryhomoeroticismhumour • Joe Siegler • Jon St. John • kick ass • kick ass and chew bubble gum • lair • Los AngelesmisogynyparodyPC gamesPlaystation 3point of viewpop-culture • Randy Pitchford • renegade • run and gunScott Millerself-fundedself-referentialsequel • SHMUP • side-scroller • spectaclestory • Todd Replogle • video gameviolencevisual depictionWolfenstein 3DXbox 360

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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