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Which clippings match 'Titles' keyword pg.1 of 1
03 MARCH 2014

Motion + Design Centre: an animated history of motion graphics

"Motion Plus Design est un projet qui a pour but de créer un centre d'exposition dédié au Motion Design à Paris. Ce projet vise dans un premier temps à définir le motion design au grand public, le but final étant de réussir à créer un centre physique dédié au motion design à Paris."

(Mattias Peresini, 18 Juin 2012, Mattrunks)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 JANUARY 2014

The strobing title animation of Enter the Void

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TAGS

2009clubbingcounterculturecredit sequence • Cyril Roy • drug dealer • drug takingdrug userEnter the Void (2009)fantasy filmfilm title designfirst-person point of view • Gaspar Noe • love hotel • Nathaniel Brown • neon club scene • neon-litnightclubopening title sequenceopening titlesorientalism • out-of-body experience • Paz de la Huerta • pharmaceutical aesthetics • psychedelic • psychedelic melodrama • stripper • strobingsubculture • technophilia • title sequencetitlesTokyotypographic animationvisceral journey

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 OCTOBER 2012

A Fistful of Dollars title sequence

"One of the most iconic title sequences ever made. A Fistful of Dollars (original Italian title: Per un Pugno di Dollari) was the first spaghetti western to gain widespread international recognition. After the film's initial release in Italy, it took three years until the film was released in the US, but Sergio Leone's revolutionary take on the western would ultimately change the genre altogether, as well as catapult the careers of Leone, main actor Clint Eastwood, and composer Ennio Morricone, whose enigmatic score still resonates today.

A Fistful of Dollars (1964) was the first film in Sergio Leone's 'Dollars' trilogy that also includes For A Few Dollars More (1965) and The Good, The Bad and The Ugly (1966). The opening title sequences for these three films were made by Italian graphic designer Iginio Lardani. Unlike Leone, Eastwood, and Morricone, Lardani did not win a one–way ticket to stardom. The designer who created one of the most iconic film title title sequences of the 20th Century, and whose bold, graphic, pop art–inspired main titles continue to inspire designers, animators and filmmakers today (see for instance Paul Donnellon's opening titles for Smokin' Aces), remains relatively unknown outside the Italian film industry.

Iginio Lardani passed away in 1986, but his son Alberto Lardani told me this anecdote: 'Sergio Leone's reaction when he first saw the title sequence for 'Per un Pugno di Dollari' was of great gratitude. Not only for its extraordinary iconic impact but also because it was designed for free.'"

(Remco Vlaanderen, 14 July 2011, WatchTheTitles)

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TAGS

19642D animationA Fistful of Dollarsanimated creditsClint EastwoodEnnio Morriconefilm genrefilm title artfilm title design • Iginio Lardani • Italianmain titlesmovie titleopening title sequence • Per un Pugno di Dollari • sequenceSergio Leonespaghetti western • title art • title design • title designer • title sequencetitles • trilogy • WatchTheTitles • western film genre

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 APRIL 2011

The typography of Jean-Luc Godard

"To me watching the films of Jean–Luc Godard is like watching a white Rauschenberg painting or listing to John Cage's '4:33': it isn't something I do for entertainment. They're historically significant because he broke all the rules in the book, but I just don't enjoy watching them. Since I only add titles from films I've seen myself there weren't many Godard films present in the Movie title stills collection.

On december 3rd, Atelier Carvalho Bernau released a free typeface to celebrate Godard's 80th birthday. The typeface was inspired by the title sequences of Godard's 'Made in U.S.A' (1966) and '2 ou 3 choses que je sais d'elle' (1967). When I started googling I found surprisingly few stills or videos from Godard's films, that's why I decided to add the most interesting ones to the Movie title stills collection.

I've located almost all films from the earlier part of Godard's career and took all stills containing typography: titles from the opening title sequences, intertitles and end ('Fin') titles. Like silent films Godard used lots of intertitles, which make his films much more typographic than other films from the '60s and 70's.

It's quite interesting to see the designs evolve. In this digital age it's refreshing to see type that isn't made on a computer: the imperfect and handmade look of the letterforms, the bad kerning, the large gaps between letters and words, the justified blocks of text, the awkwardly dotted capital I's. Even when he used an existing typeface – like Antique Olive in 'Week end' (1967) – the letterforms look as if they were cut out with an Exacto knife.

Sauve qui peut (la vie) (1980) is the last film featuring custom typefaces. In his later films Godard used existing typefaces like Futura, Univers, Helvetica and Garamond."

(Christian Annyas, 16 December 2010)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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