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20 JULY 2014

Choreographed Typography by Hyun Ju Song and Mi Lyoung Bae

"Created by Hyun Ju Song and Mi Lyoung Bae, The Moment is an exploration of language, how the meaning is formed from words. Hyun Ju Song describes a situation when people face an absurd situation in Korea, they say 'It makes no word.' This project is about the absurd moment and creates no word out of words."

(Filip Visnjic, 12/02/2014, CreativeApplications.Net)

Hyun Ju Song and Mi Lyoung Bae (2013). "The Moment", Concept, visual programming & performance by Song, Hyun Ju, Sound programming & performance by Bae, Mi Lyoung. A generative design work where the Latin alphabet is transformed into abstract geometry using 3–screen–projection, Processing and Max/MSP.

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TAGS

2013 • abstract geometry • alphabet • animated text • audiovisual experienceaudiovisual performanceblack and white • CreativeApplications.Net • disassemblegenerative design • Hyun Ju Song • Korean artist • Latin alphabet • Latin wordlegibilityletterformlive animationlive audiovisual performanceMax/MSPmedia artist • Mi Lyoung Bae • moving typeProcessing (software)projection worksrealtime animationsound design • sound programming • soundscape • The Moment (2013) • typo art projecttypographytypography experimentsvisual interpretation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 APRIL 2014

Positive and negative spaces form a skyline photo-alphabet

"Berlin–based photographer and illustrator Lisa Rienermann created this unique font out of buildings and blue skies while studying at the University of Duisburg–Essen; it was awarded a certificate of typographic excellence by the Type Directors Club New York back in 2007. 'It began with the 'Q,'' she has explained. 'I was in a kind of courtyard in Barcelona. I looked upward and saw houses, the blue sky and clouds. The more I looked, I saw that the houses formed a letter Q.' Click through for a better look at some of the letters."

(Caroline Stanley, 23 February 2011)

Fig.1 Lisa Rienermann (2007). "Type The Sky".

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TAGS

2007alphabetBarcelonablue sky • building silhouettes • buildings and environmentsbuilt environmentcityscapecloud • compositional framing • compositional strategies • courtyard • editing through selectionexperimental type design • framing space • groupingletterform • letters in the landscape • Lisa Rienermann • negative spaceoutlineperceptual organisation • photoalphabet • photographic alphabet • photographic selection • positive space • selective framing • shapessilhouetteskyskylinetype • Type Directors Club • Type The Sky (2007) • typefacetypography • University of Duisburg-Essen • visual abstractionvisual approach • visual framing • visual similarity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 MAY 2012

Ampers-Fan: the history of the ampersand

"The dark horse of the keyboard, the ampersand exists to join things together, yet remains set apart. Whilst everyone can read and understand the ampersand, or the & symbol, how many of us know where it came from?

Alistair Sooke traces the history of the funny little character that has quietly given joy to so many, from a bored medieval scribe right the way through to a modern day digital font designer. Delighting type designers throughout the centuries as a chance within a font to create a small piece of art, it is a joyful moment in a functional resource. Speaking to Ampersfans Alastair enters into a world of letterpress, punchcutting and typography and discovers how the ampersand can be found at every step of the way, bringing a joyful flick of a tail to the dullest document.

If you thought the ampersand was a bright young thing in the world of type, you couldn't be more wrong; first credited to Marcus Tiro around 63 BC, combing the letters e and t from the Latin word 'et'. Fighting off competition from his nemesis, the 'Tironian Mark', Alastair then tracks the ampersand to 16th Century Paris where it was modelled in the hands of type designer to the King, Claude Garamond, then back across the sea to William Caslon's now famous interpretation, designed with a joyful array of flourishes and swirls. Alastair will discover how the ampersand became a calling card for many typographers, showcasing some of their best and most creative work.

A simple twist of the pen, the ampersand has managed to captivate its audience since print began, in Ampersfan Alistair tries to pin down this slippery character down once and for all."

(BBC Radio 4 Programmes, 2012)

Alistair Sooke (2012). "Ampers–Fan", Producer: : Jo Meek & Gillian Donovan, A Sparklab Production for BBC Radio 4, Last broadcast on Monday, 16:00 on BBC Radio 4.

TAGS

16th century • 63 BC • Alistair Sooke • Ampers-Fan • ampersand • BBC Radio 4Bodleian Library • Claude Garamond • digital font designer • e and t • esperluette • et • European Renaissancefont • functional resource • Garamond • history of type • interpretationJan TschicholdJohannes GutenbergLatin wordletterformletterpress • ligature • Marcus Tiro • medievalParis • punchcutting • symbol • Tironian Mark • twist of the pen • type • type designer • type designerstypefacetypography • William Caslon • world of type

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 SEPTEMBER 2011

Free typefaces

"This is a website dedicated to free fonts that are readily available on the web that I use regularly and would like to share. Of course free fonts aren't always the best option and good typography isn't just about pretty fonts, but there are a few out there that are more than worth a look, and I have featured some of my favourites here.

Please note: I am not distributing these fonts or claiming ownership, I'm just trying to point fellow designers in the direction of some useful resources."

(Simon Foster)

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designersfontfontsfree fontsletterform • pretty fonts • resourcestypefacetypography • useful resources • visual communication

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 APRIL 2011

The typography of Jean-Luc Godard

"To me watching the films of Jean–Luc Godard is like watching a white Rauschenberg painting or listing to John Cage's '4:33': it isn't something I do for entertainment. They're historically significant because he broke all the rules in the book, but I just don't enjoy watching them. Since I only add titles from films I've seen myself there weren't many Godard films present in the Movie title stills collection.

On december 3rd, Atelier Carvalho Bernau released a free typeface to celebrate Godard's 80th birthday. The typeface was inspired by the title sequences of Godard's 'Made in U.S.A' (1966) and '2 ou 3 choses que je sais d'elle' (1967). When I started googling I found surprisingly few stills or videos from Godard's films, that's why I decided to add the most interesting ones to the Movie title stills collection.

I've located almost all films from the earlier part of Godard's career and took all stills containing typography: titles from the opening title sequences, intertitles and end ('Fin') titles. Like silent films Godard used lots of intertitles, which make his films much more typographic than other films from the '60s and 70's.

It's quite interesting to see the designs evolve. In this digital age it's refreshing to see type that isn't made on a computer: the imperfect and handmade look of the letterforms, the bad kerning, the large gaps between letters and words, the justified blocks of text, the awkwardly dotted capital I's. Even when he used an existing typeface – like Antique Olive in 'Week end' (1967) – the letterforms look as if they were cut out with an Exacto knife.

Sauve qui peut (la vie) (1980) is the last film featuring custom typefaces. In his later films Godard used existing typefaces like Futura, Univers, Helvetica and Garamond."

(Christian Annyas, 16 December 2010)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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