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Which clippings match 'John Cage' keyword pg.1 of 1
11 MARCH 2013

Ràdio Web MACBA: nonprofit online radio project for popular education

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TAGS

2006 • Allan Sekula • Ann Demeester • Anri Sala • Antoni Muntadas • arts and cultureBarcelonadigital resources • document the continuous present • electronic musicexperimental music • Fareed Armaly • Franco Berardi • generative music • Guy Schraenen • James Pritchett • John CageJohn OswaldJudith Butler • Kenneth Goldsmith • listening • MACBA • MACBA project • Mark Fisher • Mel RamsdenMichael Baldwin • Michel Feher • Museum of Contemporary Art in Barcelona • Natascha Sadr Haghighian • online radio • pioneering project • podcast • podcast subscription service • radio • radio medium • Radio Web MACBA • radiophonic art • Rick Prelinger • RWM • Seth Siegelaub • sound appropriationism • sound art • sound collecting • Stuart Bailey • Suely Rolnik • unpublished material • Vicki Bennett • Will Holder • Xavier LeRoy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 NOVEMBER 2012

CollageMachine: An Interactive Agent of Web Recombination

"CollageMachine builds interactive collages from the Web. First you choose a direction. Then CollageMachine will take you surfing out across the Internet as far as it can reach. It builds a collage from the most interesting media it can find for you. You don't have to click through links. You rearrange the collage to refine your exploration.

CollageMachine is an agent of recombination. Aesthetics of musical composition and conceptual detournement underlie its development. The composer John Cage and Dada artists such as Marcel Duchamp and Max Ernst used structured chance procedures to create aesthetic assemblages. These works create new meaning by recontextualizing found objects. Instead of functioning as a single visual work, CollageMachine embodies the process of collage making.

CollageMachine [1] deconstructs Web sites and re-presents them in collage form. The program crawls the Web, downloading sites. It breaks each page down into media elements—images and texts. Over time, these elements stream into a collage. Point, click, drag, and drop to rearrange the media. How you organize the

elements shows CollageMachine what you're interested in. You can teach it to bring media of interest to you. On the basis of your interactions, CollageMachine reasons about your interests; the evolving model informs ongoing choices of selection and placement. CollageMachine has been developed through a process of freely combining disciplines according to the principles of 'interface ecology.'"

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TAGS

1996 • aesthetic assemblages • agent of recombination • Andruid Kerne • collagecollage art • collage form • collage making • CollageMachine (1996) • conceptual collage • conceptual detournement • create new meaning • detournement • digital collage • evolving model • foundfound object • freely combining • influential works • interactive collage • interface ecology • Internet artInternet artworkJohn CageMarcel DuchampMax Ernst • musical composition • net artnew media • New York Digital Salon • objet trouverecombinationrecombinatory practicerecontextualisationrecontextualising found objects • selection and placement • structured chance procedures • web

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 SEPTEMBER 2012

Tuning In: A Film About Karlheinz Stockhausen

"Karlheinz Stockhausen (August 22, 1928 – December 5, 2007) was a German composer, widely acknowledged by critics as one of the most important but also controversial composers of the 20th and early 21st centuries. He is known for his ground–breaking work in electronic music, aleatory (controlled chance) in serial composition, and musical spatialization. ... Similar Artists: Iannis Xenakis, John Cage, Luciano Berio, Luigi Nono, Morton Feldman, Olivier Messiaen, Arnold Schönberg"

(last.fm)

Fig.1 Omnibus (1981). "Tuning In: A Film About Karlheinz Stockhausen", television documentary, BBC1 [published on 13 May 2012 by Thiago Carvalho Fernandes, YouTube].

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TAGS

1981abstractionacoustic • acoustic abstraction • aleatory • Arnold Schonberg • auditory abstraction • authorshipavant-gardeBBCchance artcomposercomputational aesthetics • controlled chance • creative practicedesign formalismdigital mediadigital pioneerselectronic musicexperimental musicexperimentationGermangroundbreakingIannis XenakisJohn CageKarlheinz Stockhausen • Luciano Berio • Luigi Nono • Morton Feldman • multimediamusicmusic composer • musical spatialisation • Olivier Messiaen • Omnibus (television) • operapatch panelpatternpioneer • serial composition • spatial media • Stockhausen • television documentaryvoices

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 APRIL 2011

The typography of Jean-Luc Godard

"To me watching the films of Jean–Luc Godard is like watching a white Rauschenberg painting or listing to John Cage's '4:33': it isn't something I do for entertainment. They're historically significant because he broke all the rules in the book, but I just don't enjoy watching them. Since I only add titles from films I've seen myself there weren't many Godard films present in the Movie title stills collection.

On december 3rd, Atelier Carvalho Bernau released a free typeface to celebrate Godard's 80th birthday. The typeface was inspired by the title sequences of Godard's 'Made in U.S.A' (1966) and '2 ou 3 choses que je sais d'elle' (1967). When I started googling I found surprisingly few stills or videos from Godard's films, that's why I decided to add the most interesting ones to the Movie title stills collection.

I've located almost all films from the earlier part of Godard's career and took all stills containing typography: titles from the opening title sequences, intertitles and end ('Fin') titles. Like silent films Godard used lots of intertitles, which make his films much more typographic than other films from the '60s and 70's.

It's quite interesting to see the designs evolve. In this digital age it's refreshing to see type that isn't made on a computer: the imperfect and handmade look of the letterforms, the bad kerning, the large gaps between letters and words, the justified blocks of text, the awkwardly dotted capital I's. Even when he used an existing typeface – like Antique Olive in 'Week end' (1967) – the letterforms look as if they were cut out with an Exacto knife.

Sauve qui peut (la vie) (1980) is the last film featuring custom typefaces. In his later films Godard used existing typefaces like Futura, Univers, Helvetica and Garamond."

(Christian Annyas, 16 December 2010)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 AUGUST 2006

Computational Systems for Generating Art Works

"One way to turn the 'aesthetics of everything' into concrete artworks is therefore, to devise mathematical or computational systems for generating art works which are not determined by the artist –– arbitrary artworks, random samples from a large space of possibilities. This literal–minded approach to the idea of faire n'importe quoi is known as chance art –– a genre that was widely practised in the [nineteen] sixties. (Cf. George Brecht, John Cage, Elsworth Kelly, François Morellet, Frieder Nake, Peter Struycken, Zdenek Sykora, Herman de Vries.)"

(Remko Scha)

Fig.1 François Morellet (1958). "6 répartitions aléatoires de 4 carrés noirs et blancs d'après les chiffres pairs et impairs du nombre Pi", Georges Pompidou Centre Paris, oil on wood, 80cm x 80cm.

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TAGS

1960sabstraction • aesthetic of everything • algorithmic art • arbitrary • artchance artcomputational aestheticsdesign formalism • Ellsworth Kelly • Francois Morellet • Frieder Nakegenerativegenerative design • George Brecht • Herman de Vries • John Cage • Peter Struycken • random • Remko Scha • systemvisual abstractionvisual pattern • Zdenek Sykora
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