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Which clippings match 'Helvetica' keyword pg.1 of 1
19 SEPTEMBER 2014

New York City Transit Authority Graphic Standards Manual

"In the 1960s, the New York subways were a mess, sign–wise. Station names and metro lines were spelled out in a hodgepodge of sizes, shapes, and styles. The original mosaic tiles had been joined by cut stone and terracotta–all of which clashed with newer enamel signs. They were not only inconsistent in terms of style but also in where they were placed, so straphangers didn't know where to look for directions on how to get from point A to point B.

In 1970, following the merger of the IND and BMT lines, the Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) hired Massimo Vignelli and Bob Noorda, designers at the firm Unimark, to put an end to the typographic chaos. The system they devised still informs signs made today and is painstakingly outlined in a 174–page manual"

(Belinda Lanks, 15 September 2014, Businessweek)

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TAGS

1960s1970Bob Noorda • Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit • Christopher Bonanos • clashing design • communication designdestination identificationdirectional information • directions • fastidious detail • graphic communicationgraphic designer • Hamish Smyth • Helvetica • hodgepodge • inconsistencies • Independent Subway System (IND) • information design • instruction manual • International Typographic Style • Jesse Reed • Kickstarter • letter combination • manualMassimo Vignelli • merger • metro line • metro station • Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA • Michael Bierutmodern design • modernist graphics • New York City • New York City Transit Authority Graphic Standards Manual • New York subway • Niko Skourtis • official font • organisation and communicationPentagram Designrationalisation • reissue • sans-serif typefacesignagesignage designsigns • spacing • spatial orientation • standards manual • straphanger • style guidesubwaysymbol system • system signage • train station • typographic chaos • typography • Unimark • wayfinding

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 APRIL 2013

The debate in 1991: digital or hand-crafted type?

"Metal setting is practised today by only a handful of specialists, but it continues to provide the standards by which good typesetting is judged. Photosetting, and the computer setting which has largely displaced it, are criticised for being too perfect and lacking the character of hand–crafted type. Now, increasingly, designers are using desktop publishing systems such as the Macintosh to do their typesetting. The technology has matured considerably over the last two years and the time is ripe for a reassessment: is good typesetting possible on the Macintosh?"

(Andy Benedek, 1991)

Andy Benedek (1991). "The craft of digital type" Winter no. 2 vol. 1, Eye Magazine.

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1991Adobe Systems • Aldus PageMaker • AppleApple LaserWriter • bit-mapped font • computer font • computer typesetting • Courier (typeface) • descender • design craftdesign for printdesktop publishingdisplay font • Emigre (magazine) • Eye (magazine) • font foundry • graphic designerhand-craftedhand-crafted typeHelvetica • hot metal typesetting • individual characterlegibility • letter-spacing • letterpress • Linotype (foundry) • MacMacintoshMacintosh computermetal type • metal typesetting • monotypeoffset printing • optical compensation • page description language • page layoutperfection • photosetting • PostScript • PostScript typeface • technology affordances • Times (typeface) • too perfect • traditional practicestypefacetypesettingtypography • Unternehmensberatung Rubow Weber • URW

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 JULY 2011

Helvetica: feature-length independent film about typography, graphic design and global visual culture

"Helvetica is a feature–length independent film about typography, graphic design and global visual culture. It looks at the proliferation of one typeface (which celebrated its 50th birthday in 2007) as part of a larger conversation about the way type affects our lives. The film is an exploration of urban spaces in major cities and the type that inhabits them, and a fluid discussion with renowned designers about their work, the creative process, and the choices and aesthetics behind their use of type.

Helvetica encompasses the worlds of design, advertising, psychology, and communication, and invites us to take a second look at the thousands of words we see every day. The film was shot in high–definition on location in the United States, England, the Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, France and Belgium."

(Gary Hustwit, 2007 Swiss Dots Ltd.)

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TAGS

200750th anniversaryadvertisingaesthetics • Alfred Hoffmann • Bruno Steinert • cultureDavid Carsondesign formalismErik Spiekermann • every day • feature film • global visual culture • graphic designHelveticaHermann ZapfJonathan Hoeflerkerning • Lars Muller • Leslie Savan • Massimo Vignelli • Matthew Carter • Michael Bierut • Michael C. Place • Mike Parker • modernismneutralneutralityNeville Brody • Norm (graphic design team) • Otmar Hoefer • Paula Scherpsychology • Rick Poynor • Stefan Sagmeister • Swiss StyleSwitzerlandTobias Frere-Jonestypetypefacetypographyurban spaces • use of type • visual communicationvisual culturevisual languageWim Crouwelwords • worlds of design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 APRIL 2011

The typography of Jean-Luc Godard

"To me watching the films of Jean–Luc Godard is like watching a white Rauschenberg painting or listing to John Cage's '4:33': it isn't something I do for entertainment. They're historically significant because he broke all the rules in the book, but I just don't enjoy watching them. Since I only add titles from films I've seen myself there weren't many Godard films present in the Movie title stills collection.

On december 3rd, Atelier Carvalho Bernau released a free typeface to celebrate Godard's 80th birthday. The typeface was inspired by the title sequences of Godard's 'Made in U.S.A' (1966) and '2 ou 3 choses que je sais d'elle' (1967). When I started googling I found surprisingly few stills or videos from Godard's films, that's why I decided to add the most interesting ones to the Movie title stills collection.

I've located almost all films from the earlier part of Godard's career and took all stills containing typography: titles from the opening title sequences, intertitles and end ('Fin') titles. Like silent films Godard used lots of intertitles, which make his films much more typographic than other films from the '60s and 70's.

It's quite interesting to see the designs evolve. In this digital age it's refreshing to see type that isn't made on a computer: the imperfect and handmade look of the letterforms, the bad kerning, the large gaps between letters and words, the justified blocks of text, the awkwardly dotted capital I's. Even when he used an existing typeface – like Antique Olive in 'Week end' (1967) – the letterforms look as if they were cut out with an Exacto knife.

Sauve qui peut (la vie) (1980) is the last film featuring custom typefaces. In his later films Godard used existing typefaces like Futura, Univers, Helvetica and Garamond."

(Christian Annyas, 16 December 2010)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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