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Which clippings match 'Futura (typeface)' keyword pg.1 of 1
14 SEPTEMBER 2014

A personal project to introduce a daughter to the Hungarian alphabet

"This book is the result of a very personal project aiming to introduce a little girl to the 44 letters of the Hungarian alphabet.

Illustrations were carefully designed so that every subject that appears in this book is something she's currently very much interested in. So in one way this book is not just a tool but also a diary documenting a four–year–old little girl's world in the summer of 2013 on an island in the Mediterranean Sea.

On the other hand though, hopefully it will also serve as an equally exciting source of knowledge and inspiration for anyone interested in language or design.

Ez a könyv egy személyes ajándék, aminek elsődleges célja, hogy megismertessen egy kislányt a magyar ábécé 44 betűjével.

Lgyekeztem min den itt előforduló illusztráció úgy elkészíteni, hogy azok az ő pillanatnyi érdeklődési körét legjobban tükrözzék. Így bizonyos szempontból ez a könyv nem csak egy eszköz, hanem napló is, ami, dokumentája egy négy éves kislány világbát 2013 nyarán, egy földközi – tengeri szigeten.

Másrészről viszont, remélhetőleg legalább enynyire izgalmas forráa lesz mindenki más számára is, akit egyszerűen csak érdekel a nyelv vagy a képek világa."

(Anna Kövecses, 2013)

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TAGS

2013 • abeces konyv • alphabetalphabet book • Anna Kovecses • Blurb (self-publishing) • book illustrationbright colourschildrens bookchildrens book illustrationcolour fielddiary • early education • editorial designflat colourflat spaceFutura (typeface)Hungarian • Hungarian alphabet • Hungarian language • illustration • magyar • modernist aestheticsnostalgic tribute • preschool education • Reykjaviksans-serif typefaceself-publishing • stimulating imagination • teaching language • vibrant colourwomen illustratorsyoung girl

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 APRIL 2011

The typography of Jean-Luc Godard

"To me watching the films of Jean–Luc Godard is like watching a white Rauschenberg painting or listing to John Cage's '4:33': it isn't something I do for entertainment. They're historically significant because he broke all the rules in the book, but I just don't enjoy watching them. Since I only add titles from films I've seen myself there weren't many Godard films present in the Movie title stills collection.

On december 3rd, Atelier Carvalho Bernau released a free typeface to celebrate Godard's 80th birthday. The typeface was inspired by the title sequences of Godard's 'Made in U.S.A' (1966) and '2 ou 3 choses que je sais d'elle' (1967). When I started googling I found surprisingly few stills or videos from Godard's films, that's why I decided to add the most interesting ones to the Movie title stills collection.

I've located almost all films from the earlier part of Godard's career and took all stills containing typography: titles from the opening title sequences, intertitles and end ('Fin') titles. Like silent films Godard used lots of intertitles, which make his films much more typographic than other films from the '60s and 70's.

It's quite interesting to see the designs evolve. In this digital age it's refreshing to see type that isn't made on a computer: the imperfect and handmade look of the letterforms, the bad kerning, the large gaps between letters and words, the justified blocks of text, the awkwardly dotted capital I's. Even when he used an existing typeface – like Antique Olive in 'Week end' (1967) – the letterforms look as if they were cut out with an Exacto knife.

Sauve qui peut (la vie) (1980) is the last film featuring custom typefaces. In his later films Godard used existing typefaces like Futura, Univers, Helvetica and Garamond."

(Christian Annyas, 16 December 2010)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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