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Which clippings match 'Digital Filmmaking' keyword pg.1 of 2
23 MAY 2013

Video post-production workflow for 5D Mark III RAW footage in OSX

"You have probably seen our extensive written guide on how to get Magic Lantern's 24p working on the 5D Mark III, which also includes a step–by–step instruction on how to end up with usable ProRes 4444 files.

Well, as it turns out, Sebastian here has found a much more straightforward way to post process the raw files from the 5D Mark III which allows us to skip the relatively cumbersome After Effects conversion process. This new process only utilizes Adobe Photoshop's raw import module, which allows batch processing of files (which is necessary to apply the same settings onto an entire clip consisting of individual DNG files).

Watch our video with a step–by–step instruction on how to end up with editable post–processed files!"

(Nino Leitner, 16 May 2013, cinema5D)

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TAGS

24pAdobe PhotoshopAfter Effectsbatch processingCanon EOS 5D mark IIIcolour correctioncolour gradingdigital cinematographydigital filmmakingDNGfile conversion processfilm exposure • image compression • image qualityMagic Lantern (software)OSXpost-processingpost-productionpost-production workflow • ProRes 4444 • QuickTimeRAW • RAW footage • raw import module • step-by-step instructionsTIFF • TIFF sequence • video imagevideo post-production • video post-production workflow • video processingworkflow

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 MAY 2013

The 5D mark III can do 25fps in RAW 1080p

"It's a revolutionary time for indie filmmakers: A RAW module for Magic Lantern was enabled last Sunday that hacks your Canon EOS 5D mark III to shoot 14bit RAW video in 24p and we just found out it also works in 25p."

(Sebastian Wöber, 17th May 2013, cinema5D)

The top video was recorded with the standard H.264 ALL–I CODEC, while the bottom was recorded as raw footage.

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TAGS

1080p • 14bit RAW video • 24p25 fps • 25p • bracketing • camera exposure • Canon DSLRCanon EOS 5D mark III • Canon firmware • CF card • colour saturation • compact flash • digital cinematographydigital filmmaking • Fast Zebras • film exposureFPS • FPS control • HDR • HDR bracketing • high definition video • highlight rolloff • image captureimage contrastimage qualityindie filmmakerISO • ISO control • Magic Lantern (software)RAWvideo image

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 MAY 2013

Magic Lantern: modified firmware for Canon DSLR cameras

"Magic Lantern is a software enhancement that offers increased functionality to the excellent Canon DSLR cameras. We have created an open framework, licensed under GPL, for developing extensions to the official firmware.

Magic Lantern is not a 'hack', or a modified firmware, it is an independent program that runs alongside Canon's own software. Each time you start your camera, Magic Lantern is loaded from your memory card. Our only modification was to enable the ability to run software from the memory card.

ML is being developed by photo and video enthusiasts, adding functionality such as: HDR images and video, timelapse, motion detection, focus assist tools, manual audio controls much more."

(Magic Lantern)

Fig.1 Canon 5D Mark II HDR Video from Neumann Films testing Magic Lantern's HDR video function.

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TAGS

CanonCanon 5D • Canon 5Dmk2 • Canon 5Dmk3 • Canon 5DmkII • Canon 5DmkIII • Canon 7DCanon DSLRdigital cinematographydigital filmmakingDNG • DNG raw video • DSLR • DSLR camera • enthusiasts • firmware • functionalityGNU General Public License • GNU GPL • GPLH.264high definition videohigh resolution • increased functionality • Magic Lantern (software) • memory card • modified firmware • open frameworkopen platform • RAW video • software application • software enhancement • software extensions • software hack

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 JANUARY 2012

Film Fading to Black: ARRI, Panavision and Aaton have quietly ceased production of film cameras

"While the debate has raged over whether or not film is dead, ARRI, Panavision and Aaton have quietly ceased production of film cameras within the last year to focus exclusively on design and manufacture of digital cameras. ...

'The demand for film cameras on a global basis has all but disappeared,' says ARRI VP of Cameras, Bill Russell, who notes that the company has only built film cameras on demand since 2009. 'There are still some markets––not in the U.S.––where film cameras are still sold, but those numbers are far fewer than they used to be. If you talk to the people in camera rentals, the amount of film camera utilization in the overall schedule is probably between 30 to 40 percent.'

At New York City rental house AbelCine, Director of Business Development/Strategic Relationships Moe Shore says the company rents mostly digital cameras at this point. 'Film isn't dead, but it's becoming less of a choice,' he says. 'It's a number of factors all moving in one direction, an inexorable march of digital progress that may be driven more by cell phones and consumer cameras than the motion picture industry.'

Aaton founder Jean–Pierre Beauviala notes why. 'Almost nobody is buying new film cameras. Why buy a new one when there are so many used cameras around the world?' he says. 'We wouldn't survive in the film industry if we were not designing a digital camera.'

Beauviala believes that that stereoscopic 3D has 'accelerated the demise of film.' He says, 'It's a nightmare to synchronize two film cameras.' Three years ago, Aaton introduced a new 35mm film camera, Penelope, but sold only 50 to 60 of them. As a result, Beauviala turned to creating a digital Penelope, which will be on the market by NAB 2012. 'It's a 4K camera and very, very quiet,' he tells us. 'We tried to give a digital camera the same ease of handling as the film camera.'

Panavision is also hard at work on a new digital camera, says Phil Radin, Executive VP, Worldwide Marketing, who notes that Panavision built its last 35mm Millennium XL camera in the winter of 2009, although the company continues an 'active program of upgrading and retrofitting of our 35mm camera fleet on a ongoing basis.'

'I would have to say that the pulse [of film] was weakened and it's an appropriate time,' Radin remarks. 'We are not making film cameras.' He notes that the creative industry is reveling in the choices available. 'I believe people in the industry love the idea of having all these various formats available to them,' he says. 'We have shows shooting with RED Epics, ARRI Alexas, Panavision Genesis and even the older Sony F–900 cameras. We also have shows shooting 35mm and a combination of 35mm and 65mm. It's a potpourri of imaging tools now available that have never existed before, and an exciting time for cinematographers who like the idea of having a lot of tools at their disposal to create different tools and looks.'"

(Debra Kaufman, 2011, Creative COW)

Fig.1 The Xterà by Aaton (Super16 camera with film magazine).

Fig.2 The Penelope–Delta by Aaton (digital camera with internal full resolution recorder).

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16mm200935mm • 35mm camera • 4K • 4K camera • 65mm • Aaton • AbelCine • ARRIARRI Alexascameracamera-making businesscelluloidcinemacinematographer • consumer cameras • creative industries • demise of film • devicedigitaldigital cameradigital cinematographydigital filmmakingdigital progressDSLR • ease of handling • feature filmfilmfilm camerafilm industryfilm makingfilmmaking • Jean-Pierre Beauviala • motion picture industry • obsolescencePanavision • Panavision Genesis • radical innovationRED Epic • Sony F-900 • stereoscopic • Super16 • technology innovation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 APRIL 2011

DSLR Slate App for iPhone and iPad

"The DSLR Slate App (by Chris Bayol) is a digital slate specifically designed for use with HDDSLR productions and works with iPads and the iPhone/iTouch. The app operates as a traditional slate, providing you with all the standard information (see picture above), but it also goes a step further and provides information tailored to HDDSLR production, allowing you to log shutter speed, ISO, aperture, lens, and many other details (which can come in handy while shooting tests). All of this additional information is stored by the app, and then displayed for the camera in quick bursts so that each page of information is captured for only a few frames. This makes slating on set efficient, and ensures that you have all the information you need in post–production.

This app is already quite useful, but I've spoken to the developer and there are already plenty of future tweaks in the works. Personally, I'd love to see the app give us the ability to put in production notes, to auto–increment takes as you go, and of course to find a way to jam sync the iPad to your audio recording device – right now I still use my DENECKE, which is a fantastic but expensive proposition."

(Vincent Laforet, 2 June 2010)

Fig.1 'Alex Walker (28/06/2010). 'iPad DSLR Slate App + Canon 7D Video'

Fig.2 Vincent Laforet (2010). 'DSLR Slate'

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TAGS

aperture • audio synchronisation • Chris Bayol • clapboardclapperclapperboardconvergence • Denecke • digital cinematographydigital filmmakingdigital media • digital slate • DSLR • DSLR Slate • filmmaking • HDDSLR • iPadiPhoneiPod TouchISO • iTouch • markerproductionproductivity • shutter speed • slateslate boardSMPTEsound recording • sound synchronisation • syncsync slatesync soundsynchronisationtime slatetimecodetitle sequencevideo production

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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