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08 APRIL 2011

DSLR Slate App for iPhone and iPad

"The DSLR Slate App (by Chris Bayol) is a digital slate specifically designed for use with HDDSLR productions and works with iPads and the iPhone/iTouch. The app operates as a traditional slate, providing you with all the standard information (see picture above), but it also goes a step further and provides information tailored to HDDSLR production, allowing you to log shutter speed, ISO, aperture, lens, and many other details (which can come in handy while shooting tests). All of this additional information is stored by the app, and then displayed for the camera in quick bursts so that each page of information is captured for only a few frames. This makes slating on set efficient, and ensures that you have all the information you need in post–production.

This app is already quite useful, but I've spoken to the developer and there are already plenty of future tweaks in the works. Personally, I'd love to see the app give us the ability to put in production notes, to auto–increment takes as you go, and of course to find a way to jam sync the iPad to your audio recording device – right now I still use my DENECKE, which is a fantastic but expensive proposition."

(Vincent Laforet, 2 June 2010)

Fig.1 'Alex Walker (28/06/2010). 'iPad DSLR Slate App + Canon 7D Video'

Fig.2 Vincent Laforet (2010). 'DSLR Slate'

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TAGS

aperture • audio synchronisation • Chris Bayol • clapboardclapperclapperboardconvergence • Denecke • digital cinematographydigital filmmakingdigital media • digital slate • DSLR • DSLR Slate • filmmaking • HDDSLR • iPadiPhoneiPod TouchISO • iTouch • markerproductionproductivity • shutter speed • slateslate boardSMPTEsound recording • sound synchronisation • syncsync slatesync soundsynchronisationtime slatetimecodetitle sequencevideo production

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 APRIL 2011

Plural Eyes: sync software for dual-system and multi-camera audio

"PluralEyes is a product that can save you a lot of time, especially if you have good clear audio recorded with each camera. If there is too much redundancy in the audio tracks (concert) or a lot of echo in some of the tracks (Church) you may find that PluralEyes will only be able to match a part of the sequence, leaving clips on the timeline that need to be manually synced. When this happens you can try locking the clips that were successfully synced, then exporting the sequence once again in hopes that PluralEyes will find a match for the unlocked clips, but I personally haven't had too much luck with that process.

The biggest issue I have with any type of automated software is that if it's not 100% accurate, you learn not to fully trust it and rightfully so. When you have multiple tracks to sync and potentially hundreds of clips, it becomes a daunting task to have to go through the entire edit – once for each track you were trying to sync, just to make sure that all the clips are in their proper position. It may be just as quick (or as time consuming) to sync up your clips manually as it is to use automated software that might have to be re–run a few times before finally coming close – only to force you to manually go through your piece clip by clip and track–by–track to check its accuracy.

PluralEyes can save you tons of editing time, but it's really important to have good clear audio with each track you want to sync. On the first few projects that I used PluralEyes for CS5 with I was pretty disappointed with the results. I even delayed this review until I had more experience with the software. Now that I have learned not to expect 100% accuracy I have stopped 're–syncing' and 're–syncing' in hopes of achieving it. I let PluralEyes do most of the grunt work, then I go through and just manually sync up the small percentage of clips it missed. It's pretty easy to do since most of my footage is shot in chronological order so I know that clip C will need to go somewhere between clips B and D.

Part of my high expectations with this software was due to the many demo videos I have seen, not just from PluralEyes, but also from other reviewers. Their videos often show PluralEyes successfully syncing up just a few clips, so when I started to test the software with more involved edits it was aggravating to discover a percentage of clips that weren't synced. I wasted a lot of time trying to figure out why and trying to re–sync these projects, which in–turn wasted more time. Once I got over my high expectations I become much more productive. PluralEyes can truly save you hours of editing time, especially once you learn that itis sometimes quicker to manually sync the small percentage of clips that the software misses than it is to fiddle around with re–syncing using different settings."

(Ron Risman, March 2010, Cameratown.com)

Fig.1 Justin Davey http://www.mountstudios.co.uk/

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TAGS

Adobe Premiere Pro • audioautomationclapboardclapperclapperboardconvergenceCS4 • CS5 • digital filmmakingDSLR • dual-system audio • DualEyes • editingFinal Cut Pro • Justin Davey • marker • Media Composer • multi-camera • multi-take • multicamera • music video • PluralEyes • post productionproductivityrecording • Singular Software • slateslate boardsoftwaresound recordingsyncsync slatesynchronisationtime slatetimecode • Vegas Pro • videovideo editingvideo post-productionworkflowworkflow tool

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 MARCH 2011

SMPTE Universal Film Leader

"SMPTE was founded in 1916 to advance theory and development in the motion imaging field. Today, SMPTE publishes ANSI–approved Standards, Recommended Practices, and Engineering Guidelines, along with the highly regarded SMPTE Journal and its peer–reviewed technical papers. SMPTE holds conferences and local Section meetings to bring people and ideas together, allowing for useful interaction and information exchange."

(Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers)

1). SMPTE Universal Film Leader
2). CinemaScope Release Film Leader
3). Universal Film Leader
4). 'Cincinnatus SMPTE Film Leader Test', Internet Archive.
5). Cincinnatus, 'SMPTE Film Leader (Test)', Internet Archive, Creative Commons license [QuickTime 35.4 Mb]
6). Technical document on the Universal Film Leader by the European Broadcasting Union.

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TAGS

16 SOUND START • 16mm1916 • 35 SOUND START • 35mm • Academy Leader • ANSI • cinema • CinemaScope • countdown • engineering guidelines • European Broadcasting Union • film • film countdown • film leader • foot leader • head leader • motion graphicsmoving image • PICTURE START • post productionprojector • recommended practices • SMPTE • Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers • solutionstandardssynchronisation • tail leader • technical document • technical papers • technologytelecine • theatrical motion picture exhibition • timecode • universal film leader • Universal SMPTE Leader

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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