Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Andy Warhol' keyword pg.1 of 1
17 MARCH 2017

Documentary About Avant-Garde Pioneer Tony Conrad

"Experimental artist Tony Conrad is known for his innovative works in performance art, music, video, and fine art as well as his contribution to arts education as a longtime media professor at The University of Buffalo. A former Harvard math student himself, Conrad is widely considered to be a pioneer of minimalism, media criticism, drone pop, and noise music thanks to his lifelong dedication to deconstruction, abstraction, and self-empowerment."

(Erin Dennison, cinemathread)

1

TAGS

abstractionAndy Warholaudio artavant-garde artistsavant-garde film makeravant-garde music • avant-garde pioneer • deconstructiondrone music • drone pop • experiential musicFaust (band)filmmaker • German counterculture • influential artists • Jon Cale • media criticismminimalismNew York City • noise music • Outside the Dream Syndicate (1973) • pioneering filmmaker • pioneering musician • psychoactive consequences of repetition • repeating patternrepetition • sequential repetition • structural film • structural filmmaking • The Flicker (1966) • Tony Conrad • Tyler Hubby • Velvet Underground

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 MARCH 2015

Richard Hamilton: British Pop Art Pioneer

"Hamilton was a member of the Independent Group, formed in the 1950s by a group of artists and writers at the Institute of Contemporary Arts, whose symposiums contributed to the development of Pop art in Britain. He was one of the prime practitioners of the critic Lawrence Alloway's theory of a 'fine/pop art continuum'. Hamilton interpreted this as meaning that 'all art is equal - there was no hierarchy of value. Elvis was to one side of a long line while Picasso was strung out on the other side ... TV is neither less nor more legitimate an influence than, for example, is New York Abstract Expressionism' (Hamilton, p.31)."

(Terry Riggs, December 1997, Tate)

Richard Hamilton (1956). 'Just what is it that makes today's homes so different, so appealing?'

1

TAGS

1950s19561960sAllen JonesAndy Warhol • Antony Donaldson • Brigitte Bardot • British artist • Clive Barker • Colin Self • collagecollage artDamien HirstDavid Hockney • Derek Boshier • Eduardo Paolozzi • effervescent • ephemera of popular culture • Frank Auerback • Galina Golikova • gaudy • Gerald Laing • influential creators • international art movement • James Rosenquist • Jan Howarth • Jann Haworth • Joe Tilson • Ken Russell • Lawrence Alloway • Leon Kossoff • low cost • Marcel Duchampmass audience • mass produced • Nicholas Monro • Patrick Caulfield • Pauline Boty • Peter Blake • Peter Philips • Peter Phillipspop art • pop art movement • popular art • popular culture • proto-pop art • rebellious art • Rene MagritteRichard Hamilton • Richard Smith • Robert Indiana • Ronald Brooks Kitaj • Roy Lichtenstein • short term solution • silkscreen • transient

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 AUGUST 2012

Touch me, hold me: Franz West's anti-modernist aesthetic

"'Don't Touch' is an unspoken warning in any art museum. Sometimes an institution might post a sign explaining to visitors why touching the art on view is bad – not just for the obvious catastrophic reasons, but because even oils from hands that appear to be clean can cause incremental damage. Mostly, though, visitors already know what they are (or, rather, aren't) supposed to do in art's presence.

Touch is a privilege typically reserved for the artist who made the art, as well as its professional caretakers. In fact, 'the artist's touch' has been a central value in Western art for hundreds of years.

By the start of the 1960s, with the Abstract Expressionist generation of American painters riding high, it had even become something of a fetish. The loaded brush, the whiplash line, poured paint, the palette knife and sponge – signs of distinctive gestures mattered, almost like handwriting. De–mythologizing the artist's touch was left to Andy Warhol, who announced that he instead wanted to be a machine, and to Sol LeWitt and his idea–oriented cohort of Conceptual artists. They pulled the plug for good.

Enter Franz West, the impish Viennese artist whose compelling retrospective is at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Born in 1947, West is a generation younger than Warhol and LeWitt. The fetish for the artist's touch having been retired just before he arrived on the scene, he took the next step. In the mid–1970s, West handed things over to the audience.

Literally.

Wrapping pieces of wood and cardboard and lengths of wire with gauze, coating it in plaster or papier mâché and painting the whole thing white, West made sculptures that the audience was meant to pick up, manipulate, examine at close range, hang on an arm or around the neck, or even stick one's face into. The shapes are abstract. But often, part of the sculpture suggests a handle – a direct visual invitation to audience participation. Silently it says, Touch me, hold me.

Other shapes appear designed to fit around the neck, under the arm or on other embraceable parts of the body. Or, they echo bodily orifices. (Can a sculpture have a belly button?) A glass bottle at the end of a long stick, both embedded in lumpy papier mâché, looks like a ritual implement meant to be passed around in some primitive religious ceremony.

These materials also evoke the damaged condition art holds in contemporary life. Like a cast made for a broken limb, white plaster and gauze result in sculptures bound in a medical dressing.

West calls these sculptures 'Passstücke' –– originally translated as 'fitting pieces' (passende Stücke) but now referred to as 'adaptives.' In biology, adaptation is a structure or form modified to fit a changing environment. West's touch–me sculptures attempted the same for art's new circumstance."

(Los Angeles Times, 31 March 2009)

1

2

TAGS

2009 • Abstract Expressionist • adaptives (art) • affordancesAndy Warhol • anti-modernist aesthetic • artart museumartist • arts new circumstance • audienceAustrian artistcleanlinessconceptual art • dont touch • examine • Franz West • handlehold me • incremental damage • instructions for use • LACMA • loaded brush • Los Angeles County Museum of ArtLos Angeles Times • manipulate • mid-1970s • paper macheparticipationparticipatory process • passende stucke • passstucke • pick up • ritual implement • sculptorsculptureSol LeWitt • the artists touch • touchtouch me • touching • visual invitation • warning • western art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 APRIL 2011

Andy Warhol's film portraits / screen tests

"Andy Warhol's Screen Tests were filmed from early 1964 – November 1966. Although the short films became known as Screen Tests, they were originally conceived as film portraits – portraits done on film rather than canvas."

(Gary Comenas)

Fig.1&2 Andy Warhol. Screen Test: Edie Sedgwick (1965). 16mm film (black and white, silent). 4 min. at 16fps.

1
2

TAGS

16mm19641966Andy Warholavant-gardeblack and white • Edie Sedgwick • Edith Minturn Sedgwick • fashion modelfilm • film portraits • Gary Comenas • living picturesportrait • portraits on film • screen test • silent • test • The Factory

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 MARCH 2011

Andy Warhol: The thing that I like most about doing this kind of art on the Amiga is that it looks like my work

"'Long term Amiga users will remember the unveiling of the Commodore A1000 on July 23rd 1985 at the New York Lincoln Centre. As part of the demonstration of the Amigas ability Commodore invited Andy Warhol to create a portrait of Debbie Harry, lead singer of Blondie using Island Graphics Graphicraft. This was accompanied by a full score synthesised by Roger Powell and Mike Boom, author of Musicraft."

(Gareth Knight)

Fig.1,2 Amiga world premiere launch of Amiga 1000, July 23rd 1985 (including Andy Warhol painting Debbie Harry on an Amiga)

Fig.3–8,9 Guy Wright and Glenn Suokko, photography by Edward Judice. 'Andy Warhol: An Artist and His Amiga'. AmigaWorld Magazine, January/February 1986: p.16–21.

1

2

3

4

5

6

TAGS

1980s198519868-bit • 8bit • Amiga • Amiga 1000 • Amiga Pro Paint • Andy WarholartBlondiecelebrityCommodore • Commodore A1000 • computercomputer animationcreative practice • Debbie Harry • desktop publishingdigital culturedrawingDTP • Edward Judice • Glenn Suokko • Guy Wright • historyhome computerinnovation • Island Graphics Graphicraft • material productionmedia art • Mike Boom • motion graphics • Musicraft • New YorkNorth American artistPCpersonal computerpop artportrait • premiere • Roger Powell • synthesizertechnology

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.