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Which clippings match 'Envisioning' keyword pg.1 of 2
10 FEBRUARY 2013

Panasonic's Life Wall: a vision for the future

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2008 • acoustic field • audiovisual life • CEATEC JAPAN 2008 • comfortable space • convergence • digital information mirror • dining mode • dining roomdisplay technologydisplay walldomestic futuresenvisioning • flat panel display (FPD) • flat-screen display • flat-screen television • floor-to-ceiling • future forecastingfuture of place • home appliance • home network • hybrid spaceshypermediacyinteractive screenlarge scale installation • large-screen TV • lifestyleliving roomPanasonic Life Wall • picture window • product concept • proof of concept • real and virtual environments • relaxing tone • simulated environmentsurroundingstechnology futurestelevision screen • theatre mode • virtual and real • virtual interior design • wall-sized screen

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 OCTOBER 2012

How Apple Invented The Future (and the iPad) in 1986

"While most attribute the iPad's success to Steve Jobs' genius, its roots extend much deeper into Apple's history of creativity and innovation. That's because Apple laid out an amazingly prescient vision of the iPad in 1987. That earlier effort was a guiding beacon for Apple's culture and research for a decade during Job's exile. It helped secure the ingredients that Jobs would mold into the world's most valuable company. And, it defined the personal computing model that technology titans, including Apple, Google, Amazon, and Microsoft, are fighting to deliver and dominate today."

(Chunka Mui, 24 October 2011)

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1986Alan KayApple Computer • Bonnie MacBird • commodity enabler • computational power • Cray Inc • Cray XMP 48 • digitised information • Doris Mitch • envisioning • far-fetched idea • future casting • general purpose personal computer • Hugh Dubberlyinnovative technologyinteractive multimedia • John Sculley • knowledge applications • Knowledge Navigator (1988) • Moores Law • multidimensional objects • Pepsi Generation • percolating • processing power • real time manipulation • Siri • smart agents • speculative design • super computer • three-dimensional geometries • video simulation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JULY 2012

dOCUMENTA (13)

"dOCUMENTA (13) is dedicated to artistic research and forms of imagination that explore commitment, matter, things, embodiment, and active living in connection with, yet not subordinated to, theory. These are terrains where politics are inseparable from a sensual, energetic, and worldly alliance between current research in various scientific and artistic fields and other knowledges, both ancient and contemporary. dOCUMENTA (13) is driven by a holistic and non–logocentric vision that is skeptical of the persisting belief in economic growth. This vision is shared with, and recognizes, the shapes and practices of knowing of all the animate and inanimate makers of the world, including people. (C. Christov–Bakargiev)"

(dOCUMENTA)

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2012 • ancient knowledges • animate makers of the world • artistic fields • artistic practiceartistic researcharts festival • Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev • conjecturecontemporary artcontemporary art exhibitionscontemporary art symposia • contemporary knowledges • crisis of empiricismcritical theory • current artistic research • current scientific research • divergent conceptsdOCUMENTA (festival)economic growthenvisioningexperimental knowledgeGermanyholistic approach • holistic vision • inanimate makers of the world • Kassel • knowledges • lateral thinkinglogocentricmedia artmetaphorical representationmodern art • non-logocentric vision • not yet subordinated to theory • scientific and artistic fields • scientific field • shapes and practices • speculative designspeculative science

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 APRIL 2012

Pictures Under Glass: sacrificing tactile richness

"As it happens, designing Future Interfaces For The Future used to be my line of work. I had the opportunity to design with real working prototypes, not green screens and After Effects, so there certainly are some interactions in the video which I'm a little skeptical of, given that I've actually tried them and the animators presumably haven't. But that's not my problem with the video.

My problem is the opposite, really – this vision, from an interaction perspective, is not visionary. It's a timid increment from the status quo, and the status quo, from an interaction perspective, is actually rather terrible. ...

I'm going to talk about that neglected third factor, human capabilities. What people can do. Because if a tool isn't designed to be used by a person, it can't be a very good tool, right? ...

Do you see what everyone is interacting with? The central component of this Interactive Future? It's there in every photo! That's right! – HANDS. And that's great! I think hands are fantastic! Hands do two things. They are two utterly amazing things, and you rely on them every moment of the day, and most Future Interaction Concepts completely ignore both of them. Hands feel things, and hands manipulate things.

Go ahead and pick up a book. Open it up to some page. Notice how you know where you are in the book by the distribution of weight in each hand, and the thickness of the page stacks between your fingers. Turn a page, and notice how you would know if you grabbed two pages together, by how they would slip apart when you rub them against each other.

Go ahead and pick up a glass of water. Take a sip. Notice how you know how much water is left, by how the weight shifts in response to you tipping it.

Almost every object in the world offers this sort of feedback. It's so taken for granted that we're usually not even aware of it. Take a moment to pick up the objects around you. Use them as you normally would, and sense their tactile response – their texture, pliability, temperature; their distribution of weight; their edges, curves, and ridges; how they respond in your hand as you use them.

There's a reason that our fingertips have some of the densest areas of nerve endings on the body. This is how we experience the world close–up. This is how our tools talk to us. The sense of touch is essential to everything that humans have called 'work' for millions of years.

Now, take out your favorite Magical And Revolutionary Technology Device. Use it for a bit. What did you feel? Did it feel glassy? Did it have no connection whatsoever with the task you were performing?

I call this technology Pictures Under Glass. Pictures Under Glass sacrifice all the tactile richness of working with our hands, offering instead a hokey visual facade."

(Bret Victor, 8 November 2011)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 APRIL 2012

Exposition Futur Anterieur: the future of an alternative past

"Articulée autour des trois axes convergents mais néanmoins autonomes que constituent le rétrofuturisme, le steampunk et l'archéomodernisme, l'exposition a pour enjeu de faire dialoguer des productions culturelles issues du passé, qui tentaient à leur époque d'envisager ce que pourrait être le futur – c'est–à–dire approximativement notre postmodernité – avec des œuvres d'artistes actuels qui revisitent le passé et réactivent certaines visions du futur ou de la modernité générées essentiellement entre le dernier tiers du XIXe et la première moitié du XXe siècle.

Structured around the themes of retrofuturism, steampunk and archeomodernism – a concept developed by the academic, critic and curator Arnaud Pierre, the exhibition FUTUR PERFECT aims to create a dialogue between past cultural output that imagined the future, what is essentially our postmodern era – with work from contemporary artists, which in both form and substances refer to the pas [sic] by revisiting and reviving certain visions of the future or of modernity, generated by mainly between the last third of the 19th century and the first half of the 20th century. The exhibition takes a transversal approach, intersecting different aesthetic and temporal veins. A selection of work from contemporary artists will be grouped with older work and documents – each giving perspectives to the others. In addition, one section will be dedicated to cinema and another to the various accessories, devices and artefacts developed by the steampunk community. in a separate section, the exhibition will also include the first French retrospective of the American magazine Retrofuturism, in the form of an installation designed by its originator, the artist and editor Lloyd Dunn."

(Commissaire de l'exposition / Curator : Jean–François Sanz, Galerie du Jour agnès b.)

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19th century201220th century • Adrien Beau • agnes b • Albert Robida • alternative past • archeomodernism • Arnaud Pierre • Bill Domonkos • Bob Basset • Camille Flammarion • Didier Graffet • Dove Allouche • Elise Leclercq • Emile Bayard • envisioning • Eric Caro • Etienne Leopold Trouvelot • Evariste Richer • exhibitionfantastical endsfantasy • Franck Rezzak • Franco Brambilla • futur anterieur • futur perfect • Georges Melies • Henri Armengol • Henri Lanos • historical perspective • Hugh Ferriss • Hugues Reip • imagined future • Jean-Luc Verna • Jesse DAngelo • Keith Thompson • Laurent Grasso • Laurent Montaron • Le voyage dans la Lune • Leon Benett • Leon Gimpel • Lloyd Dunn • Lucien Rudaux • Marc Caro • Marjolaine Sirieix • Markus Schinwald • Matthew Buchholz • Maurice Grunbaum • Metropolis (1927)modernity • Mr Audax • nostalgia • Plonk and Replonk • postmodern era • Ray Caesar • Redstar • retrofuturism • Retrofuturism (magazine) • retrospective • Ruppert and Mulot • Sam Van Olffen • Samon Takahashi • space travelspeculative fictionsteampunk • steampunk community • Stephane Halleux • Tempus Factoris • the past • transversal approach • visions of the futurevisual design • Xavier Veilhan

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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